General Dance Discussion > Are these rumba songs or bolero songs?

Discussion in 'General Dance Discussion' started by RookieDancer, Aug 22, 2014.

  1. RookieDancer

    RookieDancer New Member

    Are Roxette's "It Must Have Been Love" and "Listen to Your Heart" rumbas or boleros?

    What about Savage Garden's "I Knew I Loved You"?

    Reason why I ask is because I gotta showcase coming up and those were candidate songs for a rumba. However my instructor was like "nope ... those are boleros".

    Really? I practice rumbas to those songs all the time, and they don't feel awkwardly slow, so I'm starting to doubt her judgement. Perhaps they are right at the cusp where a rumba song turns into a bolero. But like I said, I can rumba to those songs just fine.
     
  2. kckc

    kckc Active Member

    I can sort of picture a bolero to It Must Have Been Love, but neither of them really grabs me as a rumba OR a bolero. All I can hear is a slightly fast NC2S for both of them. Perhaps it is time to tune up my rhythm detector. Wait, are you talking Rhythm or International? I'm thinking solely of American style. Latin dancers chime in please since I have no clue.
     
  3. danceronice

    danceronice Well-Known Member

    "Listen to Your Heart" would be closest to Bolero.
     
  4. opendoor

    opendoor Well-Known Member

    Neither nor. A rumba song should have a clave-rhythm, and a bolero a tresillo-rhythm.
     
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  5. Mr 4 styles

    Mr 4 styles Well-Known Member

    American rumba or international that makes a difference in song selection
     
  6. fascination

    fascination Site Moderator Staff Member

    right...there is the character of the dance..and there is the tempo of the dance...if it is just about tempo, you can do a lot of things to the same tempo and make it work...in general, I can practice intl ru and bolero to the same music, I can even socially dance them to the same music....
     
    Mr 4 styles likes this.
  7. RookieDancer

    RookieDancer New Member

    We're doing American Rumba. I guess all we really care about is the tempo of the music; so having a Latin feel to the song isn't required.
     
  8. bia

    bia Well-Known Member

    To my ear, they're both too slow for American rumba. I was thinking of getting out my metronome to see where they fit in relation to the "official" tempo ranges, but then I worried that that was getting a bit too dance nerdy. On the one hand, there's room for artistic flexibility in a showcase routine; on the other, it's generally a good idea to have music that your instructor is OK with. I would think that practicing to them would be fine, in that they would give you the time to really work on technical details, as long as it's with the awareness that you're ultimately going to have to get all those details in to faster music.
     
  9. fascination

    fascination Site Moderator Staff Member

    is is possible to get the music to someone who has technical capacity to bend the bpm?
     
  10. bia

    bia Well-Known Member

    Good thought -- Audacity is free, and I found it easy to use.
     
  11. Mr 4 styles

    Mr 4 styles Well-Known Member

    Bolero 24 to 26 mpm. Intl rumba 26 to 28 am rumba 30 to 32 mpm
     
  12. Mr 4 styles

    Mr 4 styles Well-Known Member

    What theme for the show dance ?? We could suggest more true American rumbas for ya
     
  13. RookieDancer

    RookieDancer New Member

    @bia ... by all means ... get dance nerdy!

    As for the theme for the show, there isn't one. It's an Arthur Murray Showcase event. For those who aren't familiar with those, you basically choose a dance you are working on and do a choreographed routine that's suitable for your level in front of an audience.

    So it's basically whatever we want. Personally, I want to do it to some contemporary pop songs. Or maybe even classic pop songs. I was practicing today to Hall&Oates' "Kiss On My List". The instructor played this song at the last rumba group class at my studio, so I'm fairly confident thats a rumba song. Well ... rumba tempo'd anyway.

    On a side note, we recently did the Unique Dance-O-Rama in Irvine, CA where we did a routine for the dinner theater show. The theme was "Your Favorite Musical". Since I don't have one, we went with hers which was The Lion King. We did a bolero to the Broadway version of "Can You Feel the Love Tonight?". Definitely not a Latin-themed song!
     
  14. Mr 4 styles

    Mr 4 styles Well-Known Member

    May I suggest " bad for you " by Holly palmer
     
  15. opendoor

    opendoor Well-Known Member

    With other words: you all don´t care about music? Right?
     
  16. danceronice

    danceronice Well-Known Member

    We're interested in dancing to it, not writing a cultural anthropology paper on it.
     
    wooh, MaggieMoves and opendoor like this.
  17. Partner Dancer

    Partner Dancer Well-Known Member

    I straddle the fence between appreciating music based on OD's narrow criteria
    and the general broader criteria based on what feels good. Much like some
    dancers define a dance narrowly verses others who believe in anything goes.

    We've all experienced "awful" dancing where the music doesn't suit the dance,
    as often happens on DWTS. Part of dance training is associating movements
    and weight changes to particular qualities in music. In many cases, the music
    is, or needs to be, revised to suit the movements, as oftentimes good listening
    music may not be particularly danceable. Rhythm templates is one ingredient
    to this formula.

    Ballroom dancing tends to be focused on movement, leaving music to
    individual interpretations. This formula is somewhat limiting, as developing
    better ears often/usually leads to better quality of movement.
     
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  18. danceronice

    danceronice Well-Known Member

    None of which precludes the idea that a pop song can in fact work fine for a particular dance, given the dances we are talking about are not Cuban or South American street or club dances but competitive forms loosely based off them and developed in Europe and North America. Or negates that the songs mentioned can be danced as International rumba or American Rhythm bolero.
     
    wooh likes this.
  19. Angel HI

    Angel HI Well-Known Member

    These posts are perfect. There is nothing wrong with songs being interpretive if that is the intent. If the intent is to dance to a rumba or bolero, then both of these posts 'must' be the 'only' criteria sought. The rest is simply irrelevant.
     
  20. Jag75

    Jag75 Active Member

    Real Rumba and real Bolero is so vastly nicer than the pop music that's used in "Rumba" and "Bolero" dancing.

    Both have no resemblance whatsoever to the songs mentioned in the OP.
     
    Angel HI likes this.

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