Tango Argentino > "Argentine" or "Argentinian"

Discussion in 'Tango Argentino' started by Dave Bailey, May 25, 2007.

  1. tangotime

    tangotime Well-Known Member

    having lived there (among other s. amer. countries ) Am well aware of their interpretation of the word argentina
     
  2. Dave Bailey

    Dave Bailey New Member

    Which is?
     
  3. jfm

    jfm Active Member

    i think we (brits) should say "argentinian" just to confuse things even more.
     
  4. tangotime

    tangotime Well-Known Member

    As previously stated-- argenteena
     
  5. Twirly

    Twirly New Member

    I don't think anyone would pronounce "Argentina" in any other way! As Dave stated, the pronunciation of -ina as in this case follows similar patterns in both English and Spanish (and other languages).

    The question was how to pronounce "Argentine".

    And if it's OK to say "Argentinian". (And why do some spell it "Argentinean"? Now surely not everything can be correct :)
     
  6. Angel HI

    Angel HI Well-Known Member

    This has been discussed to death, but I find it weird that you find Argen-[teen] weird when that's what they (the Argen-teenos) call it and themselves.
     
  7. Dave Bailey

    Dave Bailey New Member

    Ah, they're all weird anyway :p
     
  8. Heather2007

    Heather2007 New Member

    Or lets just go down The Sun route and call 'em Argy Bargies. Anybody too young to remember that? Mean tabloid.
     
  9. Dave Bailey

    Dave Bailey New Member

    Hmmm. I wonder if AT would have been adopted earlier in the UK, absent that little fracas in the South Atlantic?
     
  10. bordertangoman

    bordertangoman Well-Known Member

    Not unless you'd managed to get Maggie & Galtieri to tango together, but somehow I doubt the Iron Lady and the Tin-Pot General could have managed it.

    Its a lot easier to declare war than learn AT. (Isn't it Heather 2007 ;))

    Anyway the British have a proud tradition of calling place names in johnny foreignor countries by something slightly or totally different. Even in our own country there are freakish misnomers eg the River Avon; where avon means river in Welsh
     
  11. Dave Bailey

    Dave Bailey New Member

    I'm just wondering if the war actually had any effect, one way or the other? Personally I doubt it - British people have extremely short memories generally about this sort of thing.
     
  12. Heather2007

    Heather2007 New Member

    I just remembering saying to my father at the time: "daddy, what is Argentina doing in Scotland". I know. Me and millions of others I'll bet. :rolleyes:
     
  13. Twirly

    Twirly New Member

    Perhaps we should also use the Spanish pronunciation of "r" and "g" then?

    Seems like we're talking past each other, so maybe this discussion isn't leading anywhere.
     
  14. Joe

    Joe Well-Known Member

    I like to read magaz(eye)nes.
     
  15. Peaches

    Peaches Well-Known Member

    Why has this thread gone on for 8 pages? Why does anyone care?

    We're all dancing the same dance, right? It's not as if we go about having discussions of pronunciation while dancing it, right? So who cares?
     
  16. Heather2007

    Heather2007 New Member

    Nope!
     
  17. Angel HI

    Angel HI Well-Known Member

    Began as a legitimate point of interest, but, now...these posts iterate my earlier point, exactly.
     
  18. spectator

    spectator Member

    And what about Germans? Having the cheek to call themselves 'Deutsch'! I'd say a small matter or a diffrence between ee and ie is nothing compared to that travsety of pronounciation/naming....
     
  19. Dave Bailey

    Dave Bailey New Member

    People tend to write on my threads, for some reason :D

    Language is important, it's the way we communicate. And dance is a language, from a certain point of view.
     
  20. spectator

    spectator Member

    i don't think dave's a real person, i think he's a troll.... he bides his time waiting to start a discussion what will start all out war....
     

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