Tango Argentino > "Big sweep" barridas?

Discussion in 'Tango Argentino' started by Dave Bailey, Apr 3, 2007.

  1. Dave Bailey

    Dave Bailey New Member

    I took a class last week which has left me a little confused (not difficult, admittedly!).

    Up until then, I'd always assumed that barridas were like "illusions" - i.e. the leader doesn't actually move the follower's foot (much), but it just looks that way - i.e. the follower and leader move almost as normal, but they just happen to have their moving feet touching, so the "sweep" bit is basically an illusion.
    However, I've also been taught (by Bianca, in London) a more "dramatic" barrida, which feels more like a lunge - i.e. there's preparation, it's a larger and a more dramatic movement, the leader definitely leads the follower's foot, and there's a natural pause at the end of it.

    So, my question is, is this difference simply a matter of emphasis / style, or are there supposed to be different types of barrida?

    Or, have I been doing barridas wrong all this time?
     
  2. Tanguera

    Tanguera New Member

    There are different kinds of barrida. :)

    Someone calls them with different names to specify the differences between them: barrida, llevada, arrastre, but they are basically the same thing. I think that you have just discovered the llevada or the arrastre version of the barrida ;).
     
  3. Peaches

    Peaches Well-Known Member

    Yup. Different versions. Dunno about terminology--I've always just lumped them all together as "barridas." But definitely different versions.
     
  4. Peaches

    Peaches Well-Known Member

    Actually, now that I've been thinking about it a bit more...the second type you describe is what I learned first and run across most freqently. They're just very simple.

    It's the illusion ones that I rarely see done, and are comparatively more difficult b/c of the precise timing needed.

    Interesting that you learned them in the opposite order...
     
  5. Dave Bailey

    Dave Bailey New Member

    Ooh, new words to look up! Thanks.

    Well, "learned" is probably a bit strong - "seen and tried out" is more accurate I think :)
     
  6. Ampster

    Ampster Active Member

    IME:

    The illusion you were talking about is an "Arrestre." I do it all the time. It basically is done during a molinete, and is a cool way of changing direction, or an intro to something else. Executed and time well makes for a very elegant maneouver.

    The "Barrida," is initiated from a back ocho, and is composed of the leader's foot blocking the follower's trailing foot, and the leader, almost "Pushing" her into shifting weight onto her back leg. It's the only lead in AT that is done with such "fortitude." Also, It's an initiating move for other very sophisticated maneouvers.
     
  7. Peaches

    Peaches Well-Known Member

    I'd think there are more ways of beginning a barrida, no?

    (I've got no clue, really, since I don't lead. It just seems like it happens from more places than just that.)
     
  8. Ampster

    Ampster Active Member

    True. It's just the easiest, prettiest, and most emphatic way to initiate it (IMHO).
     
  9. Steve Pastor

    Steve Pastor Moderator Staff Member

    http://www.layuega.com/barrida.htm

    Barrida
    The barrida refers to any move in which one or other - even both - partners sweep - or appear to sweep - their partner's foot along the floor with their own.
    There are many starting positions but interplay is always between two unweighted feet and the motion is controlled by rotation of the leader's torso, not his feet.

    This site caught my attention when I spotted Alex Krebs name.
    This agrees with what I have been taught by most of my instructors, including Alex. Cacho Dante said, through an interpreter, to "gently sweep the woman's foot".
    It is much easier to move the woman's foot with your own, than it is to both lead her to step with your torso and simultaneously move your foot along with hers and keep it in contact.
    "there's preparation, it's a larger and a more dramatic movement, the leader definitely leads the follower's foot, and there's a natural pause at the end of it."

    Dave, I don't think you've been doing anything wrong. If you want to go big and showy, however ...
     
  10. Me

    Me New Member

    Tricky little lessons in frame and weight placement for both lead and follow. I hope nobody in your class got hurt!
     
  11. Dave Bailey

    Dave Bailey New Member

    Yes, I think I understand that - that's the way I was first taught to go into a sandwich, and I've been playing around with other variations from that position - good to know I'm on the right track with that.

    Great links - thanks (very distracting though!)

    In AT, it seems that the flashier visual moves are the easiest ones to do...
     
  12. Dave Bailey

    Dave Bailey New Member

    Another barrida question - are they always led by the man?

    I've seen, and had described to me, a few barridas which look like they're led by the lady (follower), as extensions of decorations - are these just illusions, or are they genuinely led by the follower? (if that makes sense...)
     
  13. Peaches

    Peaches Well-Known Member

    I've "led" one. Don't know if I was supposed to, or if it's bad or not, but I wanted to. So I did it.

    It was from a parrada. Instead of playing and then stepping over, I did a shoe shine, established some eye contact, and added some pressure against his foot, forward. We ended up turning out some and both taking a forward step with the inside leg.

    It was kind of cool, a heady sense of power, and it surprised the guy I was dancing with. (We were friends--surprised in a good way.)
     
  14. Tanguera

    Tanguera New Member

    Everything should be lead by the leader, but advanced followers are able to catch the subtile moment when they can suggest a counter-barrida.

    Of course, leaders can lead them when they like to insert them in the dance. :)
     
  15. Ampster

    Ampster Active Member

    As a general rule, Yes.

    However, for more advanced dancers who are more "In tune," there are barridas, and arrestres that the leader can initiate, and the follower accepts and takes the lead.
     
  16. Peaches

    Peaches Well-Known Member

    Oooh, interesting. More info, please?
     
  17. Ampster

    Ampster Active Member

    Ok, this is kinda hard to enunciate in print, so please, bear with me.

    The lead starts a molinete to the lead's left. After the follow's side, back, the lead gets his right foot, and "arrestre/barridas" his follow's right (trailing) foot into a side step (This is the "illusion" part, because she would have stepped on this foot anyway). The leader stops the movement with a very subtle motion. The follow's weight transfers to the left foot. Afterwards, the lead then moves his foot outboard of hers. He then moves subtly moves it away, which is the signal for her to take a side step to do an "arrestre/barrida" to his unweighted foot. The both of you then alternate arresrtes to each other in a side motion... the rest is up to you.

    Note: In order for this to work, you both need to be so intuned with each other. Otherwise, the follow ends up looking at you with a "Where's your foot going? What do I do now?" look. I've only been able to do this with some of my more experienced partners.
     
  18. Peaches

    Peaches Well-Known Member

    Ah, very cool. Thank you! (And you explained it just fine, by the way!)
     
  19. bastet

    bastet Active Member

    "Barrida
    The barrida refers to any move in which one or other - even both - partners sweep - or appear to sweep - their partner's foot along the floor with their own.

    There are many starting positions but interplay is always between two unweighted feet and the motion is controlled by rotation of the leader's torso, not his feet."



    This is how I have come to understand a barrida as well for the most part. Yes- it is easier to move the follower's foot than lead with the torso (perhaps why my other half corrects me when I practice leading these. I've only been learning lead for about 6 months- and he uses torso rotation.) We had a long discussion about it, and whether he leads me to take a weight change or not (reversing the barrida so I sweep him) he says he intiates with the torso movement.
     

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