Funstuff and Inspiration > Book Club

Discussion in 'Funstuff and Inspiration' started by dlgodud, Jul 29, 2009.

  1. dlgodud

    dlgodud Active Member

    The next step in the dance by Tim gautreaux
     
  2. CANI

    CANI Active Member

    I finished True Happiness by Pema Chodron – Audiobook. Pema makes some excellent points that struck a chord with me.

    I’m re-reading Who would you be without your story? By Byron Katie. I was originally introduced to her through a post by Larinda McRaven linking to her web-site. The videos on her site give you a good sense of her work. www. thework.com (delete the space.)

    I also read about a year or so ago two of her other books I need your love – is that true? and Loving What Is. In fact, I read both of those twice as well. If you aren’t familiar with her work, I highly recommend it and recommend all three of these books. My belief is it can only help your relationships. It tremendously helped one of mine…and actually, doing the worksheets in her process (which are not normally the type of thing that is my cup of tea – but I tried it) – completely resolved a dance issue I was having.
     
  3. dlgodud

    dlgodud Active Member

    Thank you cani! Definitely books are on my list right now!!!
     
  4. Lioness

    Lioness Well-Known Member

    Sojourn, by R.A. Salvatore.

    It's the third book in his Drizzt books.

    drizzit
     
  5. CANI

    CANI Active Member

    Finished re-reading the book in my last post...and guess I'm still in re-read mode. I just started, for the second time, Personal Development for Smart People: The Conscious Pursuit of Personal Growth by Steve Pavlina. I read it for the first time when it first came out, either end of last year or beginning of this year. It's quite good and I didn't finish all the exercises in it when I first read it, so I'm delving into that now.

    As an related aside, Steve Pavlina has written quite a nice number of articles and blogs on interesting development topics -- quick and easy to read and some I've found to be helpful and/or thought-provoking. Not all of it is my style but there certainly are some good ones to check out if you are interested. His site is www. stevepavlina.com (delete the space)
     
  6. fascination

    fascination Site Moderator Staff Member

    CANI, would you mind posting some of the particulars on the enlightenment thread?
     
  7. CANI

    CANI Active Member

    Hi fascination - The particulars about Steve Pavlina's book?
     
  8. fascination

    fascination Site Moderator Staff Member

    if you see fit...seems like some of the thoughts or exercises mightbe enlightening?
     
  9. samina

    samina Well-Known Member

    i'd like to hear how you enjoyed steve's book. i've been active on his forum on & off for much of the year, but have never read his book, although am acquainted by now with bits & pieces of the particulars.
     
  10. CANI

    CANI Active Member

    I just finished Creative Mind and Success by Ernest Holmes. One of the books I selected to explore Spirituality/Religion -- with the express goal of keeping an open mind while I read it (which I usually do for books in general, but need to remind myself in particular when reading a book of this nature). It was written in 1919. Since I've just finished it, I'm going to reflect in my journal and probably for a few months before I really 'know' what I think about it. I will say that I found it interesting, and there are a lot of positive messages to be gleamed from it. I enjoyed the time I spent reading it. It is a tiny little book, about 100 pages. The back cover says the book is Holmes' "consummate guide to the power of positive thought...and as a motivating force in living out one's dreams." It definitely gives much to think about on positive thinking, being in control of your life and your fulfillment of your dreams.
     
  11. madmaximus

    madmaximus Well-Known Member

    TAIKO
    by: Eiji Yoshikawa

    and as always... my teacher... Jane Austen.





    m
     
  12. samina

    samina Well-Known Member

    we need a "heart" emoticon for this place...
     
  13. CANI

    CANI Active Member

    Certainly...will do...
     
  14. CANI

    CANI Active Member

    ok. I can't right now, but will this week. I did enjoy it and I'll write why.
     
  15. CANI

    CANI Active Member

    Do you have a favorite? I was going to select one of hers to read (or re-read) while traveling later this month -- I was thinking Pride and Prejudice or Sense and Sensibility, but then my friend was saying Persuasion was her favorite. I haven't read any of them in many years. Which are your top picks?
     
  16. madmaximus

    madmaximus Well-Known Member

    CANI
    While I do like P&P and S&S, I've come to appreciate Emma and Mansfield Park as well.
    In the latter 2, I think JA's maturity and powers of observation seem to be at their finest (IMO)

    For a longish trip, I'd take P&P, but I do have all her work in one book, so it's an easy choice. :)






    m
     
  17. Angelo

    Angelo Member


    One of my favorites. "Make the bird want to sing"
     
  18. CANI

    CANI Active Member

    Steve Pavlina’s book, Personal Development for Smart People, is a book that I would recommend to anyone. I enjoyed it the first time I read it, and as mentioned, am reading it a second time to go further into areas I didn’t touch the first time. I wouldn’t be surprised if I do this once a year. As Steve writes,”Applying what you learn from this book won’t be easy for you. It hasn’t been easy for me, either. Real conscious growth is seldom undemanding, but it’s always worthwhile.” This is where his book differentiates itself from others. He takes you to your entire core – not just to the surface of a particular problem or to the core of one part of you – and helps you really understand what is true for you. And from there…what you are going to do about it.

    The book has a very clear structure so it appealed tremendously to the logical side of me. He starts in the first half with fundamental principles of truth, love and power, and then secondary principles derived from those – oneness, authority and courage. And then he shows how all of them working together relate to intelligence. In the second half of the book he applies these principles to habits, career, money, health, relationships and spirituality. However, both parts are full of practical examples and personal stories that make it particularly meaningful. If you’ve read his blogs/articles, then some of the practical advice in the book will ring familiar.

    Every moment spent reading it felt like a moment well spent. I never felt that he belabored a topic to the point where I was ready to move on and skip ahead. While it is true that in reading his work I did make some connections to other concepts and principles I’ve read elsewhere, the overall structure, the depth, and, most important, the practical nature of it is beyond anything I’ve read considering the breadth of the topic (personal development) he is tackling in this one book.

    I’m not saying the book is perfect, however there is much to be gained from reading it, particularly if it is read with the intent and subsequent action to actually answer the questions and do the exercises. The fact that Steve shares so openly about his journey and ‘failures’ along the way adds wonderfully to the book.
     
  19. CANI

    CANI Active Member

    Thank you! I think I'll choose Mansfield Park this time. I know I'll have to re-read P&P soon because I've been thinking about it and do love that book, but yes, for this trip I think I will go with Mansfield Park. I can barely remember that one, so it will be fresh. Thanks!
     
  20. madmaximus

    madmaximus Well-Known Member

    Mine too. Seamlessly weaving Sun Tzu's work into the narrative was very well done.







    m
     

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