Tango Argentino > Candombe and Tango

Discussion in 'Tango Argentino' started by pygmalion, Nov 22, 2003.

  1. pygmalion

    pygmalion Well-Known Member

    Still trying to understand tango and its origins, I found a link to this website, http://www.candombe.com I'm not sure how this fits, though. Exactly where did Argentine tango come from? Local dances? African rhythms? Imported European dances and rhythms? Anybody? And how did it end up in Europe and the United States (and the rest of the world)?
     
  2. will35

    will35 New Member

    Keep reading, but you'll never understand it. Don't get sidetracked or you'll turn into a scholar arguing all the time, and no dancing. Pick one of the theories, subscribe to it, and dance.
     
  3. pygmalion

    pygmalion Well-Known Member

    You're absolutely right, will. :D Dancing is about, well, dancing. The reason I ask all these questions is not just for my benefit, though. It's also for the other AT'ers or wannabe AT'ers out there who may also be curious or may have something to say. But you're right. There has to be a balance between study and action. Can't have that analysis paralysis. :shock: :lol: :D
     
  4. will35

    will35 New Member

    The danger is that if we read too much, we start to know things. What we really want is to know nothing. It helps us dance.
     
  5. pygmalion

    pygmalion Well-Known Member

    True, will. Knowing too much can be dangerous for dancing, since dancing is physical, or even emotional, rather than cerebral. So you have me convinced. Just try the tango stuff. I have some Daniel Trenner and other videos, and I have a ballroom teacher who does Argentine tango. AND I live in a town that has two large studios that both teach tango and sponsor milongas. So I have no excuse. Just dance. I'll probably STILL ask questions, though. I can't help it. :lol: :D
     
  6. will35

    will35 New Member

    Ask away, but don't believe a word I say.
     
  7. dolceamore

    dolceamore New Member

    hey pygmalion,
    i am from Uruguay actually. and the candombe, or what ive seen of it, is like i guess the samba from brazil with a lot of body shaking and fast foot work. i dunno :D
     
  8. pygmalion

    pygmalion Well-Known Member

    Hmm. You know, there's a lot of stuff out there involving native/cultural dances that have been stolen/incorprated into ballroom dances. I'm going to have to spend some time learning about dance history, too. :?
     
  9. will35

    will35 New Member

    Pygmalion wrote "native/cultural dances that have been stolen/incorprated into ballroom dances"

    There's really not much candombe that I know of in Tango except a few isolated people who use some little triple steps that might just as easily have sneaked in from Chamame. Candombe is very streetwise with the drums and everything. There were some Tango musicians who played around with Candombe or what they called Candombe. An example would be Alberto Castillo. There is probably a greater similarity in the modern Milonga such as Manzi and Piana created to the Candombe than any Tango to Candombe. Many people claim to have influenced the birth of the Tango, but your guess is as good as mine. I hate to depreciate the African inluence the way some people such as Piazzola have, but when I listen to the Tango recordings we dance to today, I don't hear much African stuff. Then again, I don't know much about African music. I am just guessing. There were some great Tango musicians from Uruguay, Canaro, Enrique Campos.
    Do you ever go back to Uruguay, Dolce? They say Montevideo is nice this time of year. I'd love to be sipping some mate in some little place right now.
     

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