Dancers Anonymous > Cooking?

Discussion in 'Dancers Anonymous' started by Pacion, Apr 10, 2004.

  1. bordertangoman

    bordertangoman Well-Known Member

    making plum, ginger and apple chutney
     
  2. j_alexandra

    j_alexandra Well-Known Member

    oven-oven does well, too, but seems to me like overkill for a bagel. YMMV
     
  3. CANI

    CANI Active Member

    Probably so. I'll just experiment with defrosting and the toaster. I don't have the toaster oven and I agree that using the whole oven is probably overkill for a bagel.
     
  4. pygmalion

    pygmalion Well-Known Member

    The last time I was on a week-long vacation rental at a time-share, I bought a toaster oven for about twelve bucks. Still have it years later. :)
     
  5. fascination

    fascination Site Moderator Staff Member

    I don't use a toaster oven much, but the rest of my family would be lost without it
     
  6. j_alexandra

    j_alexandra Well-Known Member

    OK, toaster-only technique:

    nuke 20 seconds, as before.

    Place bagel on top of toaster. PUt toaster on level 2; toast. Turn over. Do it again. Possibly a 3rd time, depending on the size of the bagel. Let it rest for a few minutes, then slice. Closest to fresh you're gonna get w/o an oven.
     
  7. flashdance

    flashdance Active Member

    Monday - United Kingdom - Fish and chips with a buttered bread roll. :mrgreen:
     
  8. danceronice

    danceronice Well-Known Member

    Must make stock before leftover chicken bones take over entire freezer....
     
  9. CANI

    CANI Active Member

    Cool! Thanks -- I'll give it a try.:)
     
  10. CANI

    CANI Active Member

    FYI...this has worked like an absolute charm -- just like fresh bagels -- wouldn't even know they've been frozen -- thanks j_alexandra!!!:D
     
  11. wonderwoman

    wonderwoman Well-Known Member

    omg yum!
     
  12. wonderwoman

    wonderwoman Well-Known Member

    I have had an urge to cook lately, and despite my better judgment, gave in to it. I generally avoid cooking at all costs, I once caused a fire on my stove boiling water for pasta. I've managed to get the hang of boiling things, so I can add that my microwave and toaster oven proficiencies.

    I made beef stew and it wasn't the worst thing I've ever cooked. I got a packet of McKormick seasoning. It said to get cubed chuck roast, it was expensive and I could have gotten something else and cut it up. I also didn't trim the fat, should have. I got a can of potatoes.. those are cooked. My canned green beans, carrots and mushrooms were cooked, my onions were raw. So I cooked the meat for two hours, adding all the vegetables in the second hour. The beef was tough, it needed to cook longer. The onions were not quite soft enough, but all the other vegetables were, and another hour would have turned them to mush.

    Next time I would brown the beef, then add the liquid and simmer for an hour, then add all the raw vegetables, and simmer for two hours. Would that be long enough for the carrots and potatoes to be soft? I think I could also try chicken instead of beef, with everything else the same. I don't know why I thought I'd want to eat red meat several days in a row. I should freeze some of this.
     
  13. j_alexandra

    j_alexandra Well-Known Member

    Do yourself a favor and brown the beef, then take it out of the pot temporarily and brown the cut up onions in the same pan (and garlic, if you're using it), then put the beef back in with the liquid. 1 hour. Veg in. One hour. Spuds in. One last hour.

    Chicken cooks much, much faster than beef, and if I stew it for 3 hours, I end up with chicken mush.
     
  14. j_alexandra

    j_alexandra Well-Known Member

    Definitely trim the fat. And yes, you can buy chuck steak and cut it up yourself, significant cost savings. It's worth it to use chuck, though; lots of flavor. Lots. If you buy a steak and cut it up into 1" chunks, it will cook faster than the huge chunks that come pre-cut in packages.

    Why buy cooked veg when the whole point of stew is that the veg cook in the liquid that has all the flavor?

    Do yourself a favor and brown the beef, then take it out of the pot temporarily and brown the cut up onions in the same pan (and garlic, if you're using it), then put the beef back in with the liquid. 1 hour. Veg in. One hour. Spuds in. One last hour.

    Chicken cooks much, much faster than beef, and if I stew it for 3 hours, I end up with chicken mush.
     
  15. Joe

    Joe Well-Known Member

    Brown the meat in the pot, then drain the fat off in a colander or sieve.
     
  16. wonderwoman

    wonderwoman Well-Known Member

    Thanks for the tips guys! It will be better when I make it again this winter :)
     
  17. wonderwoman

    wonderwoman Well-Known Member

    Oh btw JA, your instructions are based on what I used or raw veg/taters?
     
  18. j_alexandra

    j_alexandra Well-Known Member

    raw. so they can cook up all the good flavor.

    joe's advice about getting rid of the fat is very good, but you want to keep some, especially if you are going to brown onions/garlic. you need some fat in the pan to keep the onions from sticking. you can pour off most of the fat into an empty dog food can, let it harden, then throw it away. or soak it up with paper towels. just don't send it down the sink.
     
  19. wonderwoman

    wonderwoman Well-Known Member

    Oh yeah, you had said that. :)

    Wow... Guess what I've always done with excess fat from browning meat. Yeh... I've done it a couple times in the house I rent a room in, so I am thinking I should.. not. I've probably seen someone else do it and never thought anything of it.. I get it now.
     
  20. Sagitta

    Sagitta Well-Known Member

    If meat is really tough it needs longer cooking in liquid. WW have you tried a crockpot? I am thinking that would work great for you, especially with cheaper tougher meat cuts.
     

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