General Dance Discussion > Crossing Patterns Over.

Discussion in 'General Dance Discussion' started by Spitfire, Nov 14, 2003.

  1. Spitfire

    Spitfire Well-Known Member

    One thing I've learned in my dancing experience is that certain moves and patterns used in one dance can be crossed over to another.

    Some examples are the sliding door move in Swing which also works well in Cha-Cha and the Sweetheart which I originally learned in Swing is used quite a bit in Cha-Cha, Salsa and Rumba.

    However, I do limit this since it would make one dance seem too similar to the other, but the exception is NC2S. Most of the patterns I do here for the time being are those I know from other dances since I'm fairly new to it.
     
  2. pygmalion

    pygmalion Well-Known Member

    Yup, spitfire. Another couple moves done in lots of dances: crossbody leads, back- or forward- spot turns. :D
     
  3. Vince A

    Vince A Active Member

    Absolutely!
    Sliding doors, besides cha cha, can be done in ECS, NC2S, and Hustle.

    Most moves can be crossed-over to other dances . . . even ones you'd never would imagine . . . such as 2 Step and Waltz moves :shock:
     
  4. pygmalion

    pygmalion Well-Known Member

    Yes. Lots of fun. One of my former teachers used to do that all the time -- use weird steps or amalgamations in totally unexpected dances. You know, rumba steps in waltz, or whatever. It's amazing how versatile some of those steps are -- even ones you wouldn't think of.

    Then, the other fun game he like to play was doing different dances to the same song. Cha cha to a rumba or foxtrot to a hustle. He was such a hoot! :lol:
     
  5. Vince A

    Vince A Active Member

    It's amazing how some people "hear" the music . . . I've seen a WCS, a slow Hustle, a slow cha cha, and, ready for this??? . . . a couple doing a 2 Step . . . all on the same floor, same song, at the same time.

    Me thinks, someone had too many beers!
     
  6. pygmalion

    pygmalion Well-Known Member

    Probably too much beer. But it's always good for a laugh! :lol:

    And it's funny too, how you "hear" songs as you were taught them. Like at my old studio, a certain song "was" a foxtrot. At my new studio, it's a swing. Huh? Just depends on who's listening.
     
  7. Vince A

    Vince A Active Member

    And sometimes, a DJ "will call" the dance.

    I won a Hustle contest once, and the song was a song that I have on my master compilation of WCS CDs. I struggled through the entire dance contest, but the DJ picked the music for the Hustle contest.
     
  8. pygmalion

    pygmalion Well-Known Member

    Don't know why I keep running into Skippy Blair. Honestly. I've posted three different articles by her on three consecutive days! And I found each through totally separate web searches from different angles. Honest! Anyway, she wrote a good article pertinent to this subject, Vince. About music for competitions. Pretty neat. Take a look-see. Speaking of which, your post, Vince, reminded me of my comp, where the organizers chose some seriously bopping, Southern rock-style music for all the swing heats. Too funny! I loved it, but you could tell a lot of people just weren't feeling it at all. You get stuck with whatever music they pick. :?


    http://www.swingdancecouncil.com/library/COMPETITION_MUSIC_OVERVIEW.htm
     
  9. jon

    jon Member

    Very little music is written for a specific dance. People hear what they know how to dance and are used to. Heck, much of the time at one ballroom place I end up doing WCS to "Samba" and "Foxtrot" music because their "WCS" music is so awful. Voltas actually fit nicely into a WCS right side pass :)
     
  10. Spitfire

    Spitfire Well-Known Member

    Given that these two are identical I use the same for both. A favorite of mine here is to go halfway into a cross body lead and release my right hand, open up and then "orbit" her around me clockwise. 8)

    Don't know the name of this move though.
     
  11. jon

    jon Member

    There's a nice jazzy version of Love Potion #9 current among some WCS DJs now. Dramatic improvement over the Latin version that was in vogue a few years ago.
     
  12. Spitfire

    Spitfire Well-Known Member

    Ah yes, I think these are standards to the latin dances in general since they are taught in cha-cha, rumba and salsa classes; maybe not all of them but those three.
     
  13. pygmalion

    pygmalion Well-Known Member

    You can use those moves in samba and bolero too. :D My old studio used to call it the "interrelated teaching system." Learn a step in one dance, then translate it into all the related dances. Neat. :D
     
  14. jon

    jon Member

    Two feet, four beats, either 2, 3, or 4 steps, with a connected partner. There are a limited number of ways to move under these constraints, so it's unsurprising that there are similarities. That, and dance forms have been swapping genetic information back and forth promiscuously for millennia, like bacteria.
     

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