General Dance Discussion > (Dance) Partners: for better or worse

Discussion in 'General Dance Discussion' started by elisedance, Sep 6, 2007.

  1. samina

    samina Well-Known Member

    ditto that. thanks for sharing reb... was first account for me. :)
     
  2. samina

    samina Well-Known Member

    i agree!
     
  3. MrBroadway

    MrBroadway New Member

    Certainly nothing wrong with it! And I much prefer pose/hover, because you're still dancing it - you can even make it look like you meant to do it!

    The "ultimate bail-out" that I was referring to is the "beginner's re-start" - stop, let go of hold, re-gain hold & frame, and start dancing again as if at the beginning of the dance. (Probably one of those things that also sets off the judges' alarm bells!) I can't even remember the last time I did that kind of re-start.
     
  4. reb

    reb Active Member

    You'll need to remember this later . . . even pros have to dust themselves off after a collision and re-start, from inviting the lady - and the best do it with style, grace, and poise.
     
  5. MrBroadway

    MrBroadway New Member

    Hmm - good point. I can't remember when I was last in a collision that severe - but now that you mention it, I have seen the occasional pro-heats with exactly what you describe. I'll ask my pro about it this week. Thanx.
     
  6. elisedance

    elisedance New Member

    I was wondering what the lady should do in such circumstances. One has to regain poise as quickly as possible but maybe the best way to handle it is a small curtsy to the man just before taking his hand and getting back into position?
     
  7. cornutt

    cornutt Well-Known Member

    I wouldn't think there would be time. Just do a quick inventory and make sure all of your limbs are still attached :D, and then get ready to get back into frame.
     
  8. reb

    reb Active Member

    As I recount my personal misadventures in the past:
    • Open Amateur Standard Tango - trip on Vienesse Crosses (I said it was metal edge on floor, DW said it was her dress) - stern expression from tango anyway so stern we stayed - no one really noticed, maybe thought, huh?
    • Open Amateur Standard QS - we rolled so much I ended up on my back and just had fun with how ridiculous it looked - lighthearted we were and lighthearted we stayed - received an almost-ovation for the entertainment and getting back up with enthusiasm
    • Open Amateur Smooth Foxtrot - couple in front of us stuck out their leg and tripped DW who was ahead of me in the movement and separated - nothing I could do but . . . no one really noticed, maybe laughed
    As Elise suggests, in all cases, we rejoined with a flourish and had a better time because of it.

    The top Ams might have fun with this memory;), but the up-n-coming Ams hopefully can take heart from it!!

    hey, I wasn't born dancing . . . I'm 47!
     
  9. meow

    meow New Member

    Dear Son has landed on his backside a couple of times on the comp floor. Just gets up 'quicker than a speeding bullet' and with a big grin re-starts. I think the first spill was in Junior - has happened in ballroom and latin. No-one is immune.:p
     
  10. elisedance

    elisedance New Member

    DP and I have only competed at one comp as yet (two heats) but managed two trips. One (by me) was barely perceptable and may have looked like an intentional body action in tango but the second felled DP - turned out he was wearing new shoes and there was a slipperly strip attached to the heel that he had not noticed. Why on earth the manufacturer woudl do something so stupid I have no idea. I managed to support him enough to avoid the total floor-face encounter but it must have been quite a sight. Note in comp manual: check shoe bottoms....
     
  11. meow

    meow New Member

    Well, at least neither of you were hurt. That's the main thing. And, from what I understand, if you had a fall this doesn't mean you will be marked down. The adjudicators know that sometimes the floor is ultra slippery so they ignore the fall and mark you on your dancing.
     
  12. elisedance

    elisedance New Member

    Hmm. Wish I could blame the floor - but it was perfect. No seams, sprung, not slippery, not sticky. I would kill for such a floor to practice on. We weren't even close to another couple. Ah well, at least we did not screw the routine up - which was pretty good for a first comp I think.
     
  13. meow

    meow New Member

    Hey, things happen. Maybe it was first comp jitters. But then, these things happen at 1000 comps. the important thing is that no one is injured if and when falls occur.
     
  14. elisedance

    elisedance New Member

    you're right - and I'm certainly not fretting over it. By the way, the photos for the comp are up on the internet and there is a nice one of DP and I. Will post here when I can get it...
     
  15. meow

    meow New Member

    Hi ED. You and your DP look really good. Love the dress and hairstyle. DP looks very dapper and gentlemanly.
     
  16. elisedance

    elisedance New Member

    :kissme:

    DP is certainly both. Its a pleasure to dance and compete with him. He is the tall quiet type but always the gentleman, even when we argue over a step or something. I am truly very fortunate (and I hope he would say the same!!).
     
  17. elisedance

    elisedance New Member

    Stages of partnership.
    1. euphoria - you found someone to dance with. Thats close to finding eldorado. You get to share lesson costs; someone to discuss them with that understands and wants to perfect; someone to go and practice with almost for free. You are so afraid of losing this, everything he does is OK and not to be questioned (and vice versa). You treasure your dance partner like your very first boy/girlfriend. Hey, its way, way more special.
    2. Reality check - you discover (as partner does) that he is not as good at dancing as you are. Clearly not as advanced nor as experienced.
    3. Reality check 2 - you discovery that (2) was wrong: he is dancing down to you, you are no where near as advanced dancing or competing wise as he is. You are basically a clutz and must avoid at all costs your partner finding out.
    4. After 2 months of working together (no idea why partner stayed after 3, but lets not question it) you try to be polite but its all his/her fault that the steps don't work. You have your first competitoin - expecting to come in 1st and be elevated to sainthood, you are both suprisingly very pleased iwth a call back and a 6th place. Can;t figure out why - but it seems to be a milestone. You planned, practiced, performed - and above all, did not fall apart, did not abandon each oher - you did OK. It turns out that OK is actually very, very good in the book of dance partnershp. Most important of all, you competed and are still together.
    5. Practicing becomes different. Instead of either tolerating or arguing you start to work at things together. This works for me does it work for you. This works for you does it work for me. You start to work as a team.

    ........to be continued........ (I hope!)
     
  18. meow

    meow New Member

    Now, you have a 'real' partnership.:D:applause:
     
  19. elisedance

    elisedance New Member

    compliments... ahhhh...

    On DF we talk so much about problems and difficulties of partner dancing - both practically and emotionally - but rarely seem to highlight the good side. Since I just experienced a sincere compliment it made me wondered if we could share more of the nicenesses?

    Yesterday, coach (and my ex pro-am partner, who, by the way, is currently professionally partnerless) mentioned that he had been asked to do a showcase at a New Years celebration. DP asked him who he would dance with and he joked about maybe using some manikins, as he'd seen in a terrific showcase. DP then said I know who you should do it with - and pointed at me. By the way, he is not the type to do something like that in jest. I asked him about it afterwards and he said that I really was the best follower around. It was a very, very sweet and very appreciated compliment and made me feel warm all evening.

    [By the way, please don't misinterpret: this is not about me being a good dancer - I actually know of several other better local women that I am sure he would rather do it with - its about being valued and complmented by your own DP.]
     
  20. Twilight_Elena

    Twilight_Elena Well-Known Member

    Ah. Some days I just can't help thinking that I've been dancing for three years now, have got some rather tricky pieces of technique down and my partner (complete beginner) can't stay on the bloody beat if I'm not counting for him. Or lead me. I feel horribly snobbish because he's come a long way in two months and I'm definitely not perfect... But even so, sometimes I just think "don't I deserve something better?"
     

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