General Dance Discussion > Dance studios - how long have they been around?

Discussion in 'General Dance Discussion' started by Spitfire, Apr 29, 2003.

  1. Spitfire

    Spitfire Well-Known Member

    Does anyone know...

    How long has the dance studio as we know it today been around?

    Did it originate in New York or L.A. and did either Fred Astaire or Arthur Murray lead the way?
     
  2. DanceMentor

    DanceMentor Administrator

    I'm guessing dance studios as we know them started in the 30's. You know, Vernon and Irene Castle were among the first to perform and teach dancing here in the US just after the turn of the century. I know that Vernon and Irene created a syllabus with steps from the Tango, the Apache and the Black Bottem. There is a really good book called "Dancing Til Dawn" that I would love to get my hands on again that documents Vernon and Irene as well as many others who made dancing popular in that time period. Unfortunately, the book is out of print. I would love to find it again.
     
  3. pygmalion

    pygmalion Well-Known Member

    Get this! The first Fred Astaire studio opened in 1947, but Mr. Arthur Murray started teaching dance in 1912!

    Check out the Arthur Murray history {broken link removed}

    Dance studios have been around a while. :D
     
  4. dancersdreamland

    dancersdreamland New Member

    Hmm...I know I just read about the beginning of dance studios when I was doing research for my web site, but I can't recall.

    I do, however, remember reading that dance teachers were originally only hired by the very rich and elite to train young men and women on being proper and having manners when attending social dances. In terms of partner dancing, the couples NEVER danced very close and were always very open arm positions. Somewhere along the way, the bodies became closer and people were soon turned against dance...as though it were a sin to dance so close (imagine if they could see the dancing of today...bump and grind baby :wink:)

    From there, the popularity of dance among rebellions went very high. It displease the "social" "proper" type and dance teachers were more or less osterized.

    Somehow, dance again became popular and widely accepted and dance teachers were sought after once again.

    I know this is very sketchy...I'll have to review my notes and see what I can find out. I know I wrote down information about the first studios and development of various styles of dance. I'll let you know once I find out more.
     
  5. pygmalion

    pygmalion Well-Known Member

    Thanks, dd. I had a feeling if I threw a little something out there, somebody else would have some info to add. It's quite an interesting subject. :D
     

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