Salsa > Difference in types of salsa?

Discussion in 'Salsa' started by ronalds, Mar 18, 2013.

  1. ronalds

    ronalds Member

    Hi guys, I have just joined a LA salsa class. The thing is that I have previously learned the Cuban salsa, but I started to get interested in salsa and went to search more about LA and Cuban. But I could not find out the same Cuban style that I learnt. The normal timing that I use for the Cuban is ‘tap 2 3 4’ whereas for the LA I go with the ‘1 2 3 5 6 7’. I wanted to know is there any particular syllabus in salsa (kinda like how we have in latin dancing) or do instructors add in their own steps for the salsa that they teach? (so maybe my instructor adds in his own varities for the Cuban and also now for the LA). Is this the reason that I cant find the same Cuban steps I have learnt online (neither in articles, nor in youtube videos)

    Also I would love if someone could explain what is the difference between the two salsas? Im referring to the timing and steps that we do (as in how do we count it). I already read about the history of both online but those don’t really tell me what the difference in the basic steps of both types of salsas is.
     
  2. tangotime

    tangotime Well-Known Member


    There are many more styles than those you have listed. The most dominant ,is what is loosely called the " slot " ,and also Cross Body.
    In addition there is Casino... " Son"... NY PR... Cali .and Casino

    Regional differences are not uncommon, and add to this , the preference of breaking on "1" or "2" .
    Simply put... Think of Cuban as Circular and the remainder have input and ,from old time Mambo .
    As to the variations within each style, there are some foundational figures ( maybe 7/8 ) but beyond this, the more intermed/advanced work , its open season . .

    Pretty much all styles ,are somewhat bound by the music choices available in the social arena .
     
  3. ronalds

    ronalds Member

    so is it possible that the styles vary quite a bit. Say the cuban that I know and the cuban that someone else might know could in fact be different (of course I can still lead the girl, Im not referring to that). Im talking strictly step wise.
     
  4. Mr 4 styles

    Mr 4 styles Well-Known Member

    im certain they are similar but not exactly the same salsa is as diverse as ..... well salsa!!
     
  5. opendoor

    opendoor Well-Known Member

    Hi ronalds, ‘pause 234’ is puertorican, not cuban. Both LA and casino make use of
    ‘1 2 3...’ in the beginning.
    Hope there isn´t any because salsa is an improvised dance: anything goes, simply lead it. But unfortunately of course a lot of teachers, clubs, networks, franchisings, labels have developed their own syllabi.
    There are as many types you like.
     
    It's me. likes this.
  6. Steven123

    Steven123 Member

    Yeah. There are a lot of different ways to dance cuban style salsa. In fact, it is so hard to describe in a discussion forum. These methods range from a lot of really crazy body isolations that match the music to people tapping and doing a lot of circular arm motions to people just stepping and kind of minimizing arm motions that don't contribute to a lead and a combination of this range. If you stop walking around each other in a circle, then you get salsa in the slot. There are also a lot of opinions out there about how crappily people accomplish each of these methods, and I will refrain from offering mine.
     
  7. toothlesstiger

    toothlesstiger Well-Known Member

    Strictly step wise, I have had happy accidents where I discovered a new step I like, or adapted a step from an entirely different dance. Ideally, every single person creates their own style of salsa.
     
  8. tangotime

    tangotime Well-Known Member

    Actually.. 2,3,4, is old time Mambo
     
  9. opendoor

    opendoor Well-Known Member

    If you dig deep enough, almost everything in this drawer finally will stem from Cuba!
     
  10. tangotime

    tangotime Well-Known Member

    With one major exception ( in todays current vogue ).. the variations being danced.. many are from the world of B/room.. "they" even named a style after one.. CBL.

    And musically speaking, theres a large Jazz influence present in much of todays music. We could extrapolate, and make a case that "its" origins are african based, and ergo related .

    To get to a closer authentic truth, one has to talk about traditional " Son " ,and the various adaptions of that, into a sub category ( Montuno, Guajira, etc ) .

    As many know,music is very complex, with many contributors to most genres.
     
    opendoor likes this.
  11. Mr 4 styles

    Mr 4 styles Well-Known Member

    correctamundo!!
     
    opendoor likes this.
  12. ronalds

    ronalds Member

    Have you come across any youtube videos demonstrating the cuban salsa, the ones I found were completely different from what I learnt that I was beginning to actually wonder what I learnt in cuban style and whether it was correct or not!!!
     
  13. opendoor

    opendoor Well-Known Member

    Hi ronalds, there isn´t anything like correct or not. And as already said above, there isn´t anything like cuban salsa, too.
    We have to be much more precisely, and you should name the styles correctly!
    Casino for instance, is one of the prevailing cuban salsa styles (but there are a lot of others around, too).

    I have linked two casino vids. First a demo for beginners (a class résumé), then a clip from a cuban championship (campeonato bailar casino). Hope this may help. But feel free to ask again.
     
    Mr 4 styles likes this.
  14. timberamayor

    timberamayor Member

    As people have mentioned, one of the central things that distinguished Cuban salsa dancing is the rotational motion as opposed to linear. Pretty much all the old dances are contratiempo, i.e. danced on the upbeat: son, changüí, mambo, chachacha, so it's not strange for someone to also dance casino contratiempo, although most Cubans will dance on1 or on3.

    In Cuba, the average Cuban doesn't learn to dance by counting, and if you ask a Cuban in Cuba to count the steps they may count 123456. Teachers have become familiar with the 123 567 style counting that comes from the US, but it was not something that they used when I started dancing in 1999.

    The first video posted by Opendoor actually includes Miami style moves in it. I don't know where the teachers are from but some of the moves are definitely Miami, which is an offshoot of Cuban style.

    In te second video, I noticed that the dancers were partial to Los Van Van and Pupy y Los Que Son Son songs (kind of the same thing really) :) I Prefer social dancing video to demonstrate Cuban dancing but I can't post links here since I rarely post at this forum.
     
  15. opendoor

    opendoor Well-Known Member

    Simply type the URL with spaces in between so that the server wont recognizes it. Or PM the complete link.
     
  16. timberamayor

    timberamayor Member

    I tried. it won't even let me do that. Says I have to have 10 posts. I have 45 posts so I guess I'll just forget about it.
     
  17. opendoor

    opendoor Well-Known Member

    Then you haven´t been quick enough! The server identifies http/ or www. as the beginning of an internet address, but he doesn´t got a clue was h ttp/ /www. gretaflora.c om means
     
  18. timberamayor

    timberamayor Member

    all I had was watch?v=-30RzT2wn64

    It worked this time. Yesterday it was saying it was an e-mail address

    and the classic farah and Osbanis social dance video
    watch?v=4X83JbUytxM
     
    Imbrace likes this.
  19. Simi-Lanjiao

    Simi-Lanjiao Member

    Hi Timberamayor..! Can you tell us specifically which moves in Opendoor's first video that are Miami casino moves..? I'd really appreciate it. :)
     
  20. timberamayor

    timberamayor Member

    Well Coca-Cola is a Miami rueda move, not to say a Cuban will never put a woman into a turn like that but Cubans, from Cuba that is, don't use the name coca-cola in their rueda. It could be that they have picked it up from Miami rueda and decided to use it. Like I said, I don't know anything about the teachers, just that this is from a class taught in Germany probably at some congreso. All the arm styling on the part of the woman isn't particularly Cuban unless maybe this is intended as a performance class. The side stepping thing at the beginning I haven't seen before but again maybe this is some rueda performance class. I am really mostly basing my comment on the coca-cola and the general look of the dancing. they do some moves I don't know the name of but then rueda moves can have different names in different groups of dancers, so that doesn't mean much. If they do vacílala you can tell also whether or not it is a Miami or a Cuban vacílala because the Miami version features a wind-up with a tap while the Cuban doesn't.
     
    Mr 4 styles likes this.

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