Salsa > Difference in types of salsa?

Discussion in 'Salsa' started by ronalds, Mar 18, 2013.

  1. Mr 4 styles

    Mr 4 styles Well-Known Member

    timberamayor your post reminded me soo much of all the cuban and miami style i learned 8 years ago

    and promptly stopped using:( w ahhhhhhhhhhh

    need to review and trip up the LA salseras a little next time im there:D
     
  2. timberamayor

    timberamayor Member

    well if you start doing Cuban moves with them I'm sure you will because they will be trying to stay in their slot ;) You'd better warn them first or they will think you are a bad dancer unless they already know you and then they will just be thinking WT* is he doing!?!
     
  3. Mr 4 styles

    Mr 4 styles Well-Known Member

    they know i know a variety of styles and i have used cuban patterns before too. but yeah ill warn them

    something like.. okay hold on!! LOL

    they already know me too im the token white guy lOL
     
    timberamayor likes this.
  4. opendoor

    opendoor Well-Known Member

    ..for me it´s more likely a gender thingy: these girls simply don´t want to relinquish their sphere of influence!
     
  5. tangotime

    tangotime Well-Known Member

    happened to me this past w/end, with a very experienced dancer, had to moderate my style to suit .
     
    timberamayor likes this.
  6. timberamayor

    timberamayor Member

    So are you saying the LA scene is pretty much all latinos? In Sweden there are probably around 50% swedes. not that I've counted but.
    For a lot of social dancing I have to say Paris looks like a great place for timba. People have so much fun! For me that's the only point of dancing. Just watching this video makes me smile. Various degrees of skill but everyone having a great time. A mix of age groups from a baby in the tummy to gray-haired ladies and gentlemen.
     
  7. timberamayor

    timberamayor Member

    well it won't let me post this link either no matter how I try to break it up so nevermind.
     
  8. Mr 4 styles

    Mr 4 styles Well-Known Member

    where I go.. yes
     
  9. opendoor

    opendoor Well-Known Member

    In Hamburg/Germany the cuban scene got the highes percentage of africanos and latinos because over years this style was rarely formalized, LA and NY on the contrary the lowest.
     
  10. LKSO

    LKSO Active Member

    The style of salsa is dictated by the style of music, contrary to what nearly all instructors teach. It's the music that tells you how your body moves. Doing the "basic step" would be wrong in nearly all contexts of music, though you wouldn't know it if you went to a salsa club where it seems nearly everyone does the basic step regardless of the character of the music.

    Not all salsa can be easily danced to if you followed your teachers' instructions. For example, the music can be very slow and lyrical that the "basic step" would be inappropriate. In this case, a close body-to-body embrace with small steps and a gentle turning of the bodies would be appropriate to fit the mood.

    As for "LA", "NY", or "Cuban" styles... there's no such thing. The musical styles fit the times. Modern salsa bands play modern salsa music. The oldies bands played music of the previous era. "Casino rueda" is the equivalent of American line dancing - learn the steps and you can easily join in. But this is not improvised social dance; it is structured social dance.

    Salsa is improvised social dance. The music determines how to move, when to move, what to move, how fast to move... and if you don't like the music, then you can sit out. Salsa clubs are not gyms to work out in. They are for dancing and having a good time. If you don't like the music, then don't dance salsa. If you like fancy spin moves, then take gymnastics or ballet.
     
  11. Mr 4 styles

    Mr 4 styles Well-Known Member

    love the music and the dance, chicken and the egg thing....

    umm sorta
     
  12. Don Silver

    Don Silver Member

    I don't know where the other poster is going in LA, but no way is LA mostly Latinos in terms of salsa dancers. There are plenty at the clubs, but where I go there isn't 50% last time I looked around.
     
  13. Don Silver

    Don Silver Member

    I'm curious: What should instructors be teaching after they start a piece of music (for a beginner)?

    What do you suggest a new person starts learning?
     
  14. tangotime

    tangotime Well-Known Member

    Sounds like youve been reading my past posts !!. Picked these two paras ,because they highlite the current vogue .

    Im not against spins per se, but in moderation.
    The one thing that we may dis agree upon, is the way we commence to dance.. it needs to be universal
     
  15. opendoor

    opendoor Well-Known Member

    How true! This should be the slogan of this subforum! (But we should also acknowledge that a lot of salsa teachers around here actually are deep into the music and teach musicality!

    Little note: when I (we) talked of Casino, I meant Casino baile, not Casino rueda.
     
  16. tangotime

    tangotime Well-Known Member

    Actually, its not.. its stems from an old english format ,of some types of " sequence " dance, and C and W..

    " Line " dance, IS danced in a line . The other dances I mentioned, are circular in design .
     
  17. Mr 4 styles

    Mr 4 styles Well-Known Member

    see you at El Floridita on a Monday night Friday too still mostly
     
  18. LKSO

    LKSO Active Member

    In American culture, dance and music are considered two separate art forms that do not interact directly. This leads to the idea that dance is about movement instead of the idea that dance is a response to music. It's this response to music that teachers should teach.

    The club lesson before a dance almost always focuses on some sort of basic step: "on 1", "on 2", or "on clave". Perhaps teachers should tell beginners that there is no basic step, contrary to what is generally taught, and that the dance revolves around the music so they must learn to listen. Then learn to hear. Then to feel. And if that feeling moves you, then dance.

    Salsa movements focus heavily on upper body movement. The music compels you to move the shoulders and hips, something that is considered culturally obscene and sexual. But that's the music. The music's influence on the feet is mostly to keep rhythm and time but rarely focusses extensively on it. So why do teachers focus on the part of the body that the music doesn't even focus on? Probably because it's the easiest to teach.

    A person who wants to dance salsa should listen to salsa first. Salsa is not the name of the dance, it's the name of the music that can be danced to. If they can understand the music then that is a start. If, after listening to it for an extended period of time and s/he doesn't like the music, then find another musical style that s/he enjoys.
     
    Juliskamagyar and Imbrace like this.
  19. LKSO

    LKSO Active Member

    I disagree that we should start the dance with the basic step, if that's why you implied. If both (or more) partners in the dance listened to the music, then they'd know what elements of movement will be involved. It may not be footwork. In fact, the follower's part (as well as leader's) doesn't even require a basic step to be led into any turns but it does require the follower to use her feet to keep upright. Keeping upright is the key element of the dance that is not considered, probably due to unawareness.

    This idea may be new to many people but it isn't necessary to step "On 1" or "On 2" during any turn sequences that are usually taught in "intermediate" and "advanced" classes. Any footwork will do as long as the partner remains upright, and ideally on rhythm since the rhythm of the music may change during the music.
     
  20. Don Silver

    Don Silver Member


    OK, but in terms of salsa that's one of the smallest clubs in the area.

    I don't think we can generalize that to represent the overall LA scene.

    Go to Stevens, Granada, Warehouse, Zanzibar, Wokcano, Tapas or 15 others and there ARE plenty of Latinos, but I still don't think they are even half the crowd. Maybe I'm missing something.
     

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