Dancers Anonymous > Dinner time club

Discussion in 'Dancers Anonymous' started by Sagitta, Aug 16, 2005.

  1. pygmalion

    pygmalion Well-Known Member

    I had a feeling you weren't exactly comfortable in the kitchen. :) That's perfectly okay, since we're living in the 21st century, not the 17th. There's always take-out. :roll: :lol:
     
  2. lynn

    lynn New Member

    yep, who ever invented the idea of restaurants should be crowned as the "best entrepreneur ever lvied"!!
     
  3. cocodrilo

    cocodrilo New Member

    Just prepping for dinner before I head off to the dance studio.
    Made a huge blender full of gazpacho. Will saute some chicken breasts in a little olive oil with garlic and hot red peppers later on...
     
  4. lynn

    lynn New Member

    sounds yummy!! eventhough i have no idea what gazpacho is!

    coco, what's the difference between saute & stir fry?? Is stir fry the asian equivalent of saute??
     
  5. cocodrilo

    cocodrilo New Member

    Gazpacho is a cold soup originally form the Andalusian region of southern Spain. It is uncooked and usually perpared in the blender- in my recipe I put cucumbers, tomatoes, garlic, onions, celery, bell peppers, pepper, tad o' salt, olive oil and balsamic vinegar, fresh basil and a slice of bread. It is FABULOUS!

    I would say the difference between a stir-fry and sautee is in the former you move the food around constantly over a very high heat, and a wok is often used. For a stir-fry one would use an oil that has a high-burning temperature whereas in a saute one might use olive oil or even butter.
     
  6. pygmalion

    pygmalion Well-Known Member

    lol. I still remember the first time I had gazpacho -- in a restaurant, when I was in my early twenties, IIRC. I didn't know it was supposed to be cold. :lol: :lol: Fortunately, I was too timid at that point to send it back to the kitchen. :lol: :lol: I wonder what the waiter would have said, if I had. :roll:
     
  7. cocodrilo

    cocodrilo New Member

    I am very quirky about cold soups(soup in general) and have never ordered gazpacho at a restaurant.
     
  8. pygmalion

    pygmalion Well-Known Member

    Well I sure as heck am not going to make it. :lol: :lol: Just kidding. 8)
     
  9. cocodrilo

    cocodrilo New Member

    Gee, it takes a whole 8 minutes. :roll: :lol: (Let me know if you want the recipe! :wink: )
     
  10. lynn

    lynn New Member

    hmm, cold soups! the only time i read about them is in comic books! o.k., and maybe recipes too......
     
  11. DancePoet

    DancePoet Well-Known Member

    Ah! Grilled hotdogs and corn on the cob last night! :D
     
  12. pygmalion

    pygmalion Well-Known Member

    I checked a recipe online, and gazpacho seems like a pretty expensive dinner to make, if you're living in Japan. All that fresh produce can't be cheap. :?
     
  13. lynn

    lynn New Member

    not if you're close to a farm :lol: !
     
  14. pygmalion

    pygmalion Well-Known Member

    Good point. That's why I'm considering actually trying it -- the brand new farmer's market a short drive from my house. Oh and btw, the 100 degree temperatures outside are a motivating factor, as well.

    I was under the impression that a lot of the produce in Japan is imported from abroad, though. And, between that and the overall high cost of living, produce prices can be prohibitive. Or is that wrong, cocodrilo? 8)

    I googled and found this page of grocery prices that was compiled last year at several Osaka (Sakai City) -area supermarkets. The food seems a bit pricey, but not as ridiculous as I thought ... except for the price of rice! $36 for 22 pounds? Yikes. I pay about $5 - $6 for a twenty pound bag.

    http://tanutech.com/japan/jprice.html
     
  15. lynn

    lynn New Member

    whoa, vancouver is super cold lately - 20 degrees....hey, what happened to our summer??!!

    as for rice, i'd say maybe it's the brand, i can get a 10lb bag for about $9 in the local supermarket but if i go to a chinese grocery store and pick up top of the line? that's going to be about $10-20/10 lbs....
     
  16. pygmalion

    pygmalion Well-Known Member

    The list says, "rice from Japan." Not sure what that means, in terms of the quality. But there's no way in the world I'm paying that much for rice outside of a health food store. Specialty rices, I understand. But just rice? No way. Not as long as there's a Walmart grocery store anywhere nearby. :lol: :lol:

    Edit: If they'd given the price per pound, I wouldn't react so strongly. Rice here costs almost $1 per pound, if you buy the tiny bags. But, if you're buying 20 pounds at a time, it's considerably cheaper. *shrug*
     
  17. Sagitta

    Sagitta Well-Known Member

    Whaty type of rice. Even basmati? And what about organic?

    I pay about a dollar a pound for organic long grain brown rice. I pay about a dollar a pound for organic lentils, organic beans etc. :wink: I wait for them to go on sale and then stock up!
     
  18. lynn

    lynn New Member

    well, if they're "made in japan", the sticker price will be higher (i'm thinking about my sony tv....) :shock: :?

    wait a sec, you can carry a 20lb bag :shock: ??!!! I could never buy things in bulk b/c they're so heavy...maybe i need weight training first...
     
  19. lynn

    lynn New Member

    hmm, i've always wondered about organic products....are they really worth the price??
     
  20. pygmalion

    pygmalion Well-Known Member

    Exactly. For specialty rices or health-food-store rice, I'm willing to pay more. Rice sold in 22-pound sacks? I'm guessing that's probably not a specialty rice. And, since the rice is "from Japan," there aren't even transportation costs or tariffs to worry about. So what gives?
     

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