Tango Argentino > Videos > El Choclo and various Historic Sheet Music Covers

Discussion in 'Videos' started by Steve Pastor, Mar 23, 2012.

  1. Steve Pastor

    Steve Pastor Moderator Staff Member

    Argentine Tango is one dance that seems to honor its history more than most. And music is a very important part of what those who dance Argentine Tango experience.
    Here, I pass along a link to a very nicely done video...

    www.youtube.com/watch?v=D4Glc0C3LOM

    A very pleasant way to spend about 4 minutes of your time.
     
  2. AndaBien

    AndaBien Well-Known Member

    Very nice.
     
  3. Steve Pastor

    Steve Pastor Moderator Staff Member

    So, now I've got the sheet music for El Choclo, and you can see it here, too.
    http://www.todotango.com/Spanish/las_obras/partitura.aspx?id=24

    Looks like a habanera rhythm there in the bass cleff pretty much throughout the song. I note the "Tango Criollo" on the cover page. I don't hear that habanera in the above arrangement even when the other instruments are all going, except of bit at the end?

    Anyone else hear it?

    I've got the Mel Bay Argentinian Tango for keyboard book. It's interesting that the author writes that " not a single piece of music has metronome markings. As dance music, the musicicans were expected to be familiar with the genre and arrive at acceptable tempos without specific instructions."
     
  4. AndaBien

    AndaBien Well-Known Member

    Maybe I'm missing something. Doesn't the string bass start start out with it and carry it throughout most of the tune?
     
  5. Steve Pastor

    Steve Pastor Moderator Staff Member

    Maybe I'm the one who missed something! Which is why I asked.
    Maybe you have better speakers? or I'm more "tone deaf" that I could imagine.
     
  6. AndaBien

    AndaBien Well-Known Member

    Maybe you couldn't hear the forest for the trees.
     
  7. tangobro

    tangobro Active Member

  8. dchester

    dchester Moderator Staff Member

    Neither of the versions were using that score. It's pretty common for different bands to make their own arrangements.
     
  9. Steve Pastor

    Steve Pastor Moderator Staff Member

    Really, you can hear the bass playing a noticeable habanera rhythm throughout the entire song?

    My point was this song seems to have originally been something written for dancing, not as an "art piece" that people would sit and listen to. The version with the sheet music does NOT seen to be for dancing, in the sense that it does not have that clearly heard rhythm thoughout, although you could of course dance to it.

    When I was fairly recently given a pattern to dance during milonga, I could not hear that rhythm in the music that was used for class, and had to dicover for myself that the pattern of steps did in fact corespond to habanera. (You could of course dance that rhythm to that music, but having it in the music, consistently, as was done for dancers in the western swing and honky tonk genres would have been nice. I'm suprised the teacher, someone highly regarded didn't mention habanera or use better music.)

    As a side note, western swing and country bands through the 1940s used the bass as a percussion instrument rahter than using drums to get that learly heard beat for dancers.

    So, to be clear...

    You can hear a bass playing a habanera rhythm throughout the version of El Choclo linked to in the first post?
    If you can hear it throughout the song, what is it I am hearing towards the end that is deep, and in habanera rhythm, and was not there earlier?
     
  10. AndaBien

    AndaBien Well-Known Member

    The tune starts with a very strong habanera rhythm. It gets faint later on, sometimes it is carried in the melody, and sometimes it is what I think of as "implied". Sometimes it's not there at all. It is again strong at around 1:26, again around 2:50 and near the end.

    ETA: Implied is when the 1st, 3rd and 4th notes are played, but the 2nd (the 1/8th note) is omitted.
     
  11. opendoor

    opendoor Well-Known Member

    Seems that piece is kind of an historic essay, I find, that after the touch of habanera (the very beginning of tango) is fainting other styles, rhythms, riffs, arrangements, and perhaps orchestras are cited.
     
  12. AndaBien

    AndaBien Well-Known Member

    Yes. I suppose that was the intention. It works well with the illustrations.
     
  13. Steve Pastor

    Steve Pastor Moderator Staff Member

  14. dchester

    dchester Moderator Staff Member

    Not sure who this was directed to, but if it's me, the answer is no. The bass does not play what is on that score. The habanera rhythm only occurs in a few places.
     
  15. opendoor

    opendoor Well-Known Member

    Not in that original scores, but in the interpretation only.
     

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