Ballroom Dance > floor position strategy latin

Discussion in 'Ballroom Dance' started by ballroomdancertoo, Sep 29, 2017.

  1. ballroomdancertoo

    ballroomdancertoo Well-Known Member

    I was just wondering where on the dance floor do you find the best place to be... in center, on the edge of the dance floor, near a judge, etc. what is your strategy to be seen in the best light possible if there is such a thing.
     
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  2. Mr 4 styles

    Mr 4 styles Well-Known Member

    Depends on the round. Semis are for the judges. Finals for the audience
     
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  3. ballroomdancertoo

    ballroomdancertoo Well-Known Member

    thanks for the info. does this rule apply to all competition in general?
     
  4. cornutt

    cornutt Well-Known Member

    Well, for traveling dances, there's a different set of considerations. General opinion is to try to start at the beginning of a long wall. But in a big semi, you may wind up almost immediately running into couples ahead of you if you do that. I used to like to start at the beginning of a short wall. The other thing is where the best bits in your choreo are -- you want to be able to do those near the judges, so that will depend on which wall (near long wall, opposite long wall, etc.) you put them on.

    I never worried too much about it in Latin/Rhythm, other than just trying not to be too close to another couple. If you feed off of spectator energy, you'll want to be closer to the edge of the floor.
     
  5. ballroomdancertoo

    ballroomdancertoo Well-Known Member

    thanks for the insight. interesting comment. I've watched so much youtube video competition and it seems like the only people that stand out are the ones that look directly into the camera!
     
  6. dlliba10

    dlliba10 Well-Known Member

    Wow. I've never heard that before but totally like it.

    It all depends on where the judges are, but I always tell my dance babies that if the judges are stacked along a long side, one of the best places to be is on the long side across from them. If you dance up right in front of a judge, they may just look right past you, and if you're buried on one of the short sides while the judges' attention is focused on the middle of the floor, you may not be noticed. That said, lots of corollaries and extenuating circumstances, e.g., if everyone is clumped in a pack in the center, and you have lots of space on one of the short sides, then dance there so you have space and can dance full out.
     
  7. MaggieMoves

    MaggieMoves Well-Known Member

    It really depends on the dance - but I've always liked to play around near the edges. Most of the larger comps will have the judges near the edges too, so that helps. I've always generally used the consensus to stay away from the middle of the floor. It's a spot where you won't get noticed by the judges or the audience. I'll generally like to dance where ever the most people are to watch in the stationary dances (Rumba, Cha Cha, & Jive). If things get too crowded, you can also do things that will get you out of a large cluster of other dancers as well.

    For the traveling dances (Samba & Paso), I've always liked to start on the short sides of the floor. It gives the impression of a buildup before actually moving, which fits well into most music. Most Samba & Paso routines take a measure or two to develop, which won't waste this important section of the floor.
     
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  8. sbrnsmith

    sbrnsmith Well-Known Member

    I go wherever my instructor is taking me to- the problem with this is that sometimes it takes him longer than it should to find his spot. The music has already started and other couples have started the first few seconds of their routines. Besides, I don't like having to follow him while he's trying to find his place ..but there is no good way to let him know this
     
  9. RiseNFall

    RiseNFall Well-Known Member

    He's not taking your arm? I think you can ask him to do that. For example: "I feel a little lost on the competition floor sometimes while we're trying to find a good spot to start. Could you please take my arm?"
     
  10. sbrnsmith

    sbrnsmith Well-Known Member

    He does take my arm, but then we walk around in circles for a while before he decides it's the right spot to begin. It seems to take him longer than other teachers to find where he wants to start.
     
  11. ballroomdancertoo

    ballroomdancertoo Well-Known Member

    is there a pattern to his decision to find the "right" spot to start? is he waiting for the other couples to start before starting. if you do see a pattern maybe you can "suggest" to him as to a good location to begin. anyway, my 2 cents.
     
  12. FancyFeet

    FancyFeet Well-Known Member

    Mine used to do that. At practice rounds, I let go when it happens... and stand and wait for him to pick his spot, then join him. It seems to have made him more aware of the circling :)
     
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  13. RiseNFall

    RiseNFall Well-Known Member

    In that case, you should simply use your best dance posture and demeanor as the two of you tour the floor. ;) Presumably, he knows what he's doing.
     
  14. cornutt

    cornutt Well-Known Member

    That's a little OCD, if you ask me... if it makes that much difference where you start, your choreography is not flexible enough.
     
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  15. RiseNFall

    RiseNFall Well-Known Member

    While it might be OCD, I personally wouldn't call a pro on it if I were his student.
     
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  16. cornutt

    cornutt Well-Known Member

    I don't know if I would either, but it would annoy me since, being a lead, I have to set the frame and then pick up the music before I can start, and I don't want to still be working on that while everyone else is dancing. However, when I was doing pro-am, my pro usually let me choose where to start. My philosophy was to get somewhere and be ready when the music begins.
     
  17. RiseNFall

    RiseNFall Well-Known Member

    Well, yes, but neither OP (of this question) nor I are a leader. When Pro and I have started a little late for whatever reason, he always sets up and starts beautifully. If he were preventing me from doing my part, that would be another matter.

    Once a less experienced leader and I were on the floor a touch late (it happens) and he did start to rush the setup. I took the liberty of slowing us down enough that I was comfortable with our frame etc.
     
  18. Larinda McRaven

    Larinda McRaven Site Moderator Staff Member

    I HATE bring dragged in circles as my lead paces and wanders. I do what FancyFeet said. I let go. I let him do his thing. And in competition I say very directly to him, just loud enough for him to hear, "stop pacing, Stop pacing, Stop Pacing, Get In Place". Then I join him when he gets his jitters out and gets focused.

    I encourage my students to IMMEDIATELY go to their next spot. IMMEDIATELY. Not by running, but by moving sooner rather than later. I'd rather be there before anyone else. And if that spot suddenly becomes undesirable as too many people crowd in I coach my leads to wait it out, then very deliberately take my hand and walk purposefully to a new spot. The MC can see that and may wait for us before cuing the DJ. And he may not. The music may even start while we walk. Deliberate is good. Late in the music is even ok. Either way it is a clear cut decision.

    "Here or there? Not here, but maybe over th, well no, let's go over... nope maybe here, or there... circle circle circle. Here? Or there?" ...not good

    I know that doesn't help sbrn, as a lady student with a male pro. But as a female teacher that is a behavior I work very hard to eliminate in my men students.
     
    Last edited: Oct 9, 2017
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  19. ballroomdancertoo

    ballroomdancertoo Well-Known Member

    sorry guys, but what is OCD mean? thanks
     
  20. Larinda McRaven

    Larinda McRaven Site Moderator Staff Member

    obsessive compulsive disorder
     

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