Funstuff and Inspiration > Fun Facts and Trivia Thread !!!

Discussion in 'Funstuff and Inspiration' started by Ray Sison, May 30, 2010.

  1. Ray Sison

    Ray Sison New Member

    That's what I have read, too, Spitfire...
     
  2. Ray Sison

    Ray Sison New Member

    Saturday was named no later than the 2nd century for the planet Saturn, which controlled the first hour of that day according to Vettius Valens. Its Latin name dies Saturni ("Saturn's Day") entered into Old English as Saeternesdaeg.

    (Source: Wikipedia)
     
  3. Ray Sison

    Ray Sison New Member

    Nice fun facts, BTM! :cheers:
     
  4. Ray Sison

    Ray Sison New Member

    Rhode Island!

    The official name of Rhode Island is: "State of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations". This name, however, has nothing to do with slavery.

    As Wikipedia explains:

    Roger Williams, a theologian who was one of the first to advocate freedom of religion, separation of church and state, abolition of slavery, and equal treatment to Native Americans, was forced out of the Massachusetts Bay Colony. Seeking religious and political tolerance, he and others founded "Providence Plantations" as a free proprietary colony. "Providence" referred to the divine providence and "plantations" referred to an English term for a colony (people leave one place and are "planted" in another). Thus, this name bore no relation to the later Southern and Caribbean Islands slave plantations. Later on, Providence Plantations and Rhode Island were merged to form the Colony of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations.

    "Rhode Island and Providence Plantations" is the longest official name of any state in the Union. On June 25, 2009, the General Assembly voted to allow the people to decide whether to keep the name or drop "Providence Plantations" due to the misperception that the name relates to slavery. The referendum election was held on this subject during the November 2, 2010 elections, and the people overwhelmingly voted (78% to 22%) to keep the original name.
     
  5. Ray Sison

    Ray Sison New Member

    Also (from Wikipedia, too): Despite the name, most of Rhode Island is on the mainland United States. The official name of the state, Rhode Island and Providence Plantations, derives from the merger of two colonies...
     
  6. mindputtee

    mindputtee Well-Known Member

    Just learned in my pathogenic microbiology class today that the vagina has about 20 grams of bacteria in it. Kind of nasty.
     
  7. Ray Sison

    Ray Sison New Member

    :rolleyes: Yikes, mindputtee!
     
  8. Ray Sison

    Ray Sison New Member

    The name Tuesday derives from the Old English "Tiwesdæg" and literally means "Tiw's Day". Tiw is the Old English form of the Proto-Germanic god *Tîwaz, or Týr in Norse, a god of war and law.

    Source: Wikipedia...
     
  9. Ray Sison

    Ray Sison New Member

    The months have interesting origins for their names, too...
     
  10. Ray Sison

    Ray Sison New Member

    February was named after the Latin term februum, which means purification, via the purification ritual Februa held on February 15 (full moon) in the old lunar Roman calendar. January and February were the last two months to be added to the Roman calendar, since the Romans originally considered winter a monthless period.

    Source: Wikipedia
     
  11. Ray Sison

    Ray Sison New Member

    What character was removed from the alphabet, but is still used every day?

    Johnson & Johnson, Barnes & Noble, Dolce & Gabbana: the ampersand today is used primarily in business names, but that small character was once the 27th part of the alphabet. Where did it come from though? The origin of its name is almost as bizarre as the name itself.

    The shape of the character (&) predates the word ampersand by more than 1,500 years. In the first century, Roman scribes wrote in cursive, so when they wrote the Latin word et which means “and” they linked the e and t. Over time the combined letters came to signify the word “and” in English as well. Certain versions of the ampersand, like that in the font Caslon, clearly reveal the origin of the shape.

    The word “ampersand” came many years later when “&” was actually part of the English alphabet. In the early 1800s, school children reciting their ABCs concluded the alphabet with the &. It would have been confusing to say “X, Y, Z, and.” Rather, the students said, “and per se and.” “Per se” means “by itself,” so the students were essentially saying, “X, Y, Z, and by itself and.” Over time, “and per se and” was slurred together into the word we use today: ampersand. When a word comes about from a mistaken pronunciation, it’s called a mondegreen. Find out why here.

    (The ampersand is also used in an unusual configuration where it appears as “&c” and means etc. The ampersand does double work as the e and t.)

    The ampersand isn’t the only former member of the alphabet. Learn what led to the extinction of the thorn and the wynn.


    From: http: // hotword. dictionary. com/ampersand/
     
  12. Ray Sison

    Ray Sison New Member

    1. From 1895 until 1958, the French controlled a number of countries in the western part of what continent?

    2. In 1838, the US government forcibly moved 15,000 members of this Indian tribe from their peaceful homes in Georgia to the Oklahoma territory. Four thousand of them died along this "Trail of Tears." Which Indian tribe was displaced in this manner?

    3. When future President of the United States Andrew Jackson established this city in 1819 he named it after an ancient city of Egypt. What is it?

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    Answers:

    1. Africa

    2. Cherokee

    3. Memphis, but not Alexandria, Virginia, which is much older


    Source: triviacafe dot com...
     
  13. Ray Sison

    Ray Sison New Member

    Where do flies go in the winter? Do they die, fly to warmer climates, or hibernate?

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    HIBERNATE - in dry and warm spaces such as home attics...

    (From triviacafe dot com)
     
  14. Ray Sison

    Ray Sison New Member

    Question 1 - What is the minimum number tennis shots that could be hit by both players in a complete set of tennis?

    Question 2 - The amount of chemicals in our drinking water is measured in milligrams per liter. The ratio of one milligram per liter is the same as the ratio of one dollar to ... how many?

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    ANSWERS:

    1. 36

    2. one million


    Source: triviacafe dot com
     
  15. bordertangoman

    bordertangoman Well-Known Member

    great one...and I knew what an ampersand is :)
     
  16. Ray Sison

    Ray Sison New Member

    Thanks, BTM! :cheers:
     
  17. Ray Sison

    Ray Sison New Member

    Question: In which year did the United States government begin printing paper money? Was it closer to 1790, 1820, or 1860?
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    Answer: 1860--before that, there were hundreds of individual banks which printed their own kinds of bank notes.


    (From triviacafe dot com)
     
  18. Ray Sison

    Ray Sison New Member

    Question: In his amazing career, George Lucas has written and produced dozens of films, but he directed only three - in 1971, 1973, and 1977. Name them.
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    ANSWER:

    1971...THX-1138 1973 ... AMERICAN GRAFFITI 1977 ... STAR WARS


    Source: triviacafe dot com
     
  19. Ray Sison

    Ray Sison New Member

    Question: At the time the American colonies went to war with England, which American city had the largest population?
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    ANSWER:
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    PHILADELPHIA


    Source: triviacafe dot com
     
  20. Ray Sison

    Ray Sison New Member

    Question: The Pony Express mail service, established in 1860, could carry mail by horseback 2,000 miles in 10 days. What were the easternmost and westernmost states of this rapid mail service?
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    MISSOURI and CALIFORNIA Between Saint Joseph, Mo., and Sacramento, California


    Source trivacafe dot com
     

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