How does a tryout work?

Discussion in 'Ballroom Dance' started by latin-ballroom, Nov 13, 2012.

  1. latin-ballroom

    latin-ballroom New Member

    How does a try out for partnership usually work?
    Can you tell me your experiences?

    Do you just improvise and follow each other (follow the man) ?
    Or do you walk/come up of a small choreography first and then dance it?

    Im talking about pre-champ,champ level.

    Hope its not a strange question
  2. Gorme

    Gorme Active Member

    Bring your tryout partner to your coach and have him/her conduct the lesson with the sole purpose of it being a tryout. The coach will have a set of movements that you will go through to judge how well the two of you can work together and how you may possibly resolve differences. At the end of the lesson, the coach will give you feedback (in private) over their opinion of the potential partner.
    stizzz and frotes like this.
  3. latin-ballroom

    latin-ballroom New Member

    Thanks!

    What dances do you usually dance in a try out for latin? Is it rumba and cha cha?

    Does try outs happen without a coach? If yes, how do they work out then?
  4. Joe

    Joe Well-Known Member

    Tryouts happen both ways--with coach, without coach. Maybe you have more prospects than you can afford to take lessons with a coach in a reasonable amount of time. Maybe you think some prospects are stronger than others, and you don't want to spend money on a coaching tryout unless you think they're a strong candidate.
  5. Mr 4 styles

    Mr 4 styles Well-Known Member

    agree with gorme and joe would advise you try out with a coach

    pick your fave latin dance and the partner pick theirs then try those

    the try one dance you each like least
  6. Gorme

    Gorme Active Member

    The dance doesn't matter. The coach supervising the tryout will pick what they think is best to go through a mental checklist that they will use to evaluate your partnership. Your coach knows your strength and weaknesses and mostly just want to evaluate how the partner interacts with you.
  7. Gorme

    Gorme Active Member

    When I did tryouts without a coach, I chatted with them asking about goals, motivations, schedules, finances, etc. Towards the end, I danced around a little bit just to get an idea how they feel and whether I think we'd be able to work together. I chose some basic actions that everyone should know.
    frotes likes this.
  8. opendoor

    opendoor Well-Known Member

    Leave the coach out, perhaps also leave the try-out dance out. What only counts is height relation (about -5 inches barefooted). Proficiency, experience, progress all will come from alone, if either of you wants to.
  9. vit

    vit Active Member

    Well, height relation is important, but it's very much about all other things. If first impression about person (both dancing and overall) are not very positive, progressing can be very slow and painful
    Bailamosdance likes this.
  10. Bailamosdance

    Bailamosdance Well-Known Member

    Not dancing at a try out seems counterintuitive to say the least!
    danceronice, Milen and vit like this.
  11. opendoor

    opendoor Well-Known Member

    For me dancing and having someone in your arms was much to much binding, for me anyway. A cup of coffee in the afternoon or a glass of wine in the evening always worked pretty well for me. Never made a mistake in choosing my dance partners. To get rid of someone after you´ve already started working together actually requires some toughness.
  12. Bailamosdance

    Bailamosdance Well-Known Member

    Er, a glass of wine?
    Jananananana likes this.
  13. twnkltoz

    twnkltoz Well-Known Member

    I assume you are talking about partners for Tango, yes? This discussion is about finding a competition partner. Very, very different world.

    My advice to the OP is not to write off a prospect just because the try-out doesn't go perfectly. It will take time to really get in sync with each other, so if you get along well and you think you can work together, that goes a long way. Can you imagine spending several hours per day with this person?
    Gorme and Bailamosdance like this.
  14. vit

    vit Active Member

    There is no much chance that try-out with someone you never danced with will be perfect. Also, I suppose that OP is in relatively early phase of his dancing career, so it's hard to decide what is close to "perfect" and what is close to "disaster", so in that case, a good trainer can be of help to make a decision

    My competitive days are long gone, but recently, I had a number of something like "mini try-outs" with a big number of various dancers on social salsa scene, more than 40 of them were ex latin dancers or even still active (you can tell immediately that a person danced or is dancing latin without asking anyway), several of those top classes, they were from several countries ...of course, always tried some cha cha with them if possible but it wasn't much different if we were dancing even salsa or whatever ... there were also a number of ex dancers from other genres (jazz, hiphop, balet, poledancing, belly dancing etc) ... And you usually feel is it working with particular person or not within seconds. With some person you feel you could go to the competition immediately and she can be from other country and you never saw her before, with other it simply feels wrong, and both of them can have similar competitive achievements (much better than me anyway) ... and it was the same with those several real tryouts I had in those days ... if it didn't work immediately, it never worked well
  15. opendoor

    opendoor Well-Known Member

    Can you specify the difference? For I never heard of such.
  16. twnkltoz

    twnkltoz Well-Known Member

    In Tango, you are looking for someone to connect and dance with. It's a very introspective dance between two people. The original poster is looking for someone for Latin competition. So, they need to be of compatible level and the partnership needs to be one that has a chance at meeting their goals competition-wise. Skill and style are definite factors, and looking good together is certainly a plus.

    I'm sure others can weigh in on this, but the goals are just totally different.
    Bailamosdance likes this.
  17. opendoor

    opendoor Well-Known Member

    Sorry opener for hijacking your thread to some extend, but I found twnkltoz´ view really interesting.
    I would not agree. What you meant would be the task of/for social dancing. A fixed dancing partner in tango has got a totally different function. Only ambition is the common denominator: you want to prepare a public show or choreo, want to take part in a campeonato, or agree on working hard on special topics.

    No, from my perspective there only are slight differences.
  18. twnkltoz

    twnkltoz Well-Known Member

    OK, then how is it you can determine whether someone is a good competition or show partner by having coffee?

    Let's not forget, when you are looking for a competition partner, you will be spending thousands and thousands of dollars per year on training, costumes, entry fees, travel costs, etc. That is a major commitment.
    danceronice and Bailamosdance like this.
  19. Jananananana

    Jananananana Active Member

    I like having a coffee/tea with someone along with a dance try-out to get to know them a little bit. I think that connecting with a person and being able to communicate with them is imperative to a good dance partnership.
  20. Jananananana

    Jananananana Active Member

    If you don't talk to the person, you can't communicate well.

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