Tango Argentino > "I don't know this song."

Discussion in 'Tango Argentino' started by twnkltoz, Feb 9, 2014.

  1. Steve Pastor

    Steve Pastor Moderator Staff Member

    The United States, and Europe too, have their own cultures, and their own take on the Argentine Tango of Argentina. That applies not only to how, and to what, people will dance "Argentine Tango." I'll say again that I think we should stop using the term "milonga" in the United States, because it is so unlike what happens at a traditional milonga. Or maybe they should be advertised as a nuevo milonga. Ouh. I like that.
     
    twnkltoz and Lilly_of_the_valley like this.
  2. Lilly_of_the_valley

    Lilly_of_the_valley Well-Known Member

    That is true. Most milongas in the US are not milongas. They are practicas at best.
     
  3. Lui

    Lui Active Member

    Of course do women ask men for a dance in Buenos Aires - just not in a verbal way: They strike a pose and catch your eye. And then, there is just the opposite: staring in one’s drink – a clear rejection.

    Playing the game of tango with these more sophisticated rules extends the interaction from the dance floor into more byplay. It’s a little more subtle and can be more fun, given everybody is willing and able to play along.

    Since flirting seems to be only one step away from sexual harassment nowadays, Germans are not trained in such subtle ways anymore. Women lack the experience to send those signals and men can’t decode them properly.

    Therefore, if a woman has to plainly ask for a dance in order to have fun, than go for it! It won’t destroy the Tango Culture.

    Meanwhile, we all might seduce each other to play by the extended set of rules, little bit little, one by one. For me that is a much better perspective, than renaming the Milonga and keep playing by the lowest common denominator: the brute force frontal approach.
     
    opendoor and twnkltoz like this.
  4. opendoor

    opendoor Well-Known Member

  5. Steve Pastor

    Steve Pastor Moderator Staff Member

    Or not. But really, since I am where I am, I don't have much choice but to play by the local rules.

    If the specific skills and codes that are part of the Argentine Tango culture at its point of origin were never successfully transmitted to another culture, there isn't really anything to be destroyed. It certainly won't be destroyed at the point of origin.

    And so I propose the Eurolonga and the Amerilonga.
    Practica or practilonga work perfectly well for me.
     
  6. Lui

    Lui Active Member

    @opendoor

    I can’t relate to anything mentioned in that article, but then, fitting in was never a priority of mine.

    I strongly believe in “Make Your own party, since there might be nobody else who does it for You!” Consequently, I harbor deep respect for the women who ask instead of enduring an evening of gloom. (Although sometimes I have to remind myself of that fact – especially when being ask at an awkward moment in an uncomfortable tone.)

    @Steve Pastor

    Of course You may call Your event everything you like:), but I will stick with “Milonga”. Just to indicate the ideal I’m aiming at, even if it is just an utopia that doesn’t even exist in Argentina in that way.
     
  7. jantango

    jantango Active Member

    Lui wrote:
    "Therefore, if a woman has to plainly ask for a dance in order to have fun, than go for it! It won’t destroy the Tango Culture."

    That's true. Those who invite men don't know the tango culture and therefore can't respect it. It's all about getting what one wants, when one wants it.

    Lui wrote:
    "Of course do women ask men for a dance in Buenos Aires - just not in a verbal way: They strike a pose and catch your eye. And then, there is just the opposite: staring in one’s drink – a clear rejection.

    That's not how it's done in BsAs. Everyone is seated at tables. There is no overt gesturing or hand waving to be invited. It's all quit civilized. The rejection is merely looking away.
     
  8. Lui

    Lui Active Member

    At least in theory you have: be a trend-setter.

    When I came to Berlin roughly 7 years ago, I missed most things I like about tango: evenings of traditional tango music, tandas, careful dancing in small space, suits and evening gowns, show acts done in costume and many things more. Therefore Sonja and I decided to offer Tango the way we like - even when only done in small scale.

    Nowadays, many places use tandas composed of music sometimes even too restrictive for my own taste, most schools try to teach at least a little floor craft and many ideas and concepts poop up all over the scene very similar to the ones we use. We won’t have been the only cause of this change, but we gave some inspiration, for sure. I still hope, I might inspire some to stop throwing heaps of wax on the floor. This way we might get back some wonderful slippery floors and unstrained joints.
     
    sixela and opendoor like this.
  9. Lui

    Lui Active Member

    Jan, I agree I have never seen much hand waving at a official milonga, but…

    ... In my experience, Argentine women a very capable to strike a pose while sitting at a table and they can catch an eye without disturbing a “civilized” atmosphere. Actually, most seem to be able pull of that feat anytime and anywhere under any circumstances.

    The classic Tanguera likes to appear very distant and aloof in public. All is done in style and minute gestures. It’s a challenge to decipher her. Is she sending out a NO, No or no? - meaning no/maybe/yes please! It took me years to get into the “no-class”. Argentine women are no docile submissives to male whims, but have their own sophisticated ways to get things done their way -
    on and off the dance floor.
     
    sixela likes this.

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