General Dance Discussion > .....my instructor just quit.......

Discussion in 'General Dance Discussion' started by Fretful_Porpentine, Feb 17, 2006.

  1. dancelvr

    dancelvr Well-Known Member


    *gasp* Ewwwwwwww.......
     
  2. etp777

    etp777 Active Member

    /me whistles innocently
     
  3. elisedance

    elisedance New Member

    well, its true n'est pas?? Thats finished me off for the month. Two unsolvable metaphysical questions at once...

    I'm still struggling with my childhood fear of growing up. I was prone to falling over a lot as a child and I did not want to grow up 'cause it was so much further to fall.
     
  4. elisedance

    elisedance New Member

    I hasten to add that that fear turned out to be true too - how on earth did I end up in ballroom dancing? Shoulda done judo - they teach you to fall...
     
  5. etp777

    etp777 Active Member

    Heh, I learned how to fall, I dance, and still not always easy.

    Heh, still a lways amuses pros at studio when I refer to lead for two swing steps (same actual component, just can't remember name of the step), as doing an arm bar. Actually didn't want to do step at first and wouldn't give a clear lead because it seemed like a martial arts/defense move I knew, and even hinting at that, to a woman, just seemed inherently wrong.
     
  6. wooh

    wooh Well-Known Member

    You can learn to fall in ballroom too. Did a stupid floor sweep in a group number. People didn't understand why I didn't find it scary. It's like, hello! I fall down all the time! Now I just know when.:)
     
  7. elisedance

    elisedance New Member

    :uplaugh:

    You need to teach a class...
     
  8. etp777

    etp777 Active Member

    Heh, NP was "being used to mop the floor", as everyone described the choreoigrapy sessions wit bruno thi spast week. I was busy taking lesson with new buddy teacher, but couldn't miss it completely . And wa hard not to laugh at new pro. :)
     
  9. DL

    DL Well-Known Member

    True. After that, there's even a fair bit about not falling (or at least making everyone else fall before you fall), too. :)
     
  10. DL

    DL Well-Known Member

    Every so often if my stuff is on the floor at the studio, and I'm tired, I'll take a nice fall to get to it, because it's quicker and easier than crouching or bending. Then I have to explain that I'm fine and did it on purpose, to concerned onlookers.
     
  11. etp777

    etp777 Active Member

    Heh DL, that's one I haven't tried yet. Between wrestling and the judo tricks dad (former black belt who competed in national junior championships in judo), certainly have some idea of how to fall ,but closest Iv'e come is "taking a knee" while flipping former pro voer my shoulder during showcase. Made good use of what I'd leearned of translating force, as let me flip her ove rmy shoulder while absorbing force in my own body to keep her from going over too fast (wanted to slow it down to give her more control and keep hre from getting hurt again ), but still doesn't make sense o explain things who dno't know what I know.
     
  12. DL

    DL Well-Known Member

    Several women I've known in martial arts have had no mercy exploiting that way of thinking when I've practiced with them, and good for them. As an aside, they also tend not to mind if a guy's train of thought ends up being, "hey, she's pretty... OWW!" Good for them, again.

    However, it's a good point, and I worry in group classes when I have a judo habit similar to a lead that I'm attempting at Jive speed with an untrained partner who has, in a martial arts sense, naive trust and no instinct for self defense. Then I stop everything and make the instructor point out exactly what makes this safe in a dancing context, so I can do it that way on purpose (e.g., "oh, the arm is always in front of the motion here, and she completes the spin so it's not behind her back anymore before I raise it, great").

    I saw a couple of similar, "things that made me go, 'hmm'," in my brief exposures to the DVIDA silver mambo syllabus, too (there's a hip throw in there, as well as a couple of joint locks). I can't remember them offhand.

    Incidentally, this goes both ways. In bronze jive, I've seen some instructors teach ladies, as arm styling for the stop-and-go, to windmill their left arms in a big circle. The ladies are usually worried about hitting their partners in the face, but I worry about what that arm is doing on the downswing after that. My right elbow is never straight in that moment (not that it ought to be anyway).
     
  13. DL

    DL Well-Known Member

    Your dad has more judo credentials than I have. I'm a longtime dabbler who only flirted with competition and has a waning practice commitment.

    I don't think I quite get your exact point here, because, "flip over shoulder," is nonspecific, but I have in general seen many common elements among throws lifts/tricks. It seems impossible that there wouldn't be similar principles involved for controlling either type of technique.
     
  14. jwlinson

    jwlinson Member

    I can actually say I made someone think!
     
  15. tanya_the_dancer

    tanya_the_dancer Well-Known Member

    Here's a thing though: what if you were already taking lessons with the best teacher available? (This is why I had a long-distance partnership for some time).
     
  16. wooh

    wooh Well-Known Member

    A new point of view is always a valuable thing, even if it's not considered the "best."
     
  17. etp777

    etp777 Active Member

    blackmail them into continuing to teach you, ttd. :)
     
  18. tanya_the_dancer

    tanya_the_dancer Well-Known Member

    Actually now he moved back in the area. :) But about a year or so, he would visit once every few weeks and I and his other students would cram as many lessons into 3-4 days he'd be here as we possibly could. That wasn't an ideal situation, but still better than other local options.
     
  19. etp777

    etp777 Active Member

    Heh, did same type of thing during my one visit back to states when i was in kuwait. Definitely far from ideal, but it can work. :)
     
  20. happyshoes

    happyshoes New Member

    Instructor quit studio!

    My instructor has left our studio suddenly and I am quite devastated. He was the most skilled of the teachers and was very generous with his instruction. I learnt a lot this past year and he was very pleased with my progress. Thanks to all your earlier help, I had prepared really clear goals for this year and we had just started working on them. It never seemed like he was going to leave.

    I am sure many of you have been through similar situations. Any words of encouragement or hope will help me.

    Down and out.
     

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