Tango Argentino > Rasche notation

Discussion in 'Tango Argentino' started by Captain Jep, Apr 16, 2009.

  1. Captain Jep

    Captain Jep New Member

    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 5, 2017
  2. DL

    DL Well-Known Member

    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 5, 2017
  3. opendoor

    opendoor Well-Known Member

    Hi CJ, interesting thread! Interesting notation system!

    But, this is my opinion: As far as everyone has to invent his/her own tango - so everyone should invent his own system of notation ! A system should grow with you and the cited one can not. Like the computer languages in the 70s got more and more compley from year to year.
     
  4. Aurora

    Aurora New Member

    It is very different from Labanotation. Here is a fairly basic example of Labanotation: http://dancenotation.org/lnbasics/frame0.html (There is a link on this page to some examples of L. used for ballroom, including a little tango.)
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 5, 2017
  5. DL

    DL Well-Known Member

    Hi, and thanks.

    I can tell that the two are very different. I was wondering why one would be developed if the other already existed, when one might choose to use one rather than the other, for that matter when and for what purposes one might ordinarily choose to use a formal notation system at all, what kinds of things are more naturally expressed in one than the other, what the most sophisticated uses of each are, etc., etc.

    Cheers,
    DL
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 5, 2017
  6. Aurora

    Aurora New Member

    It helps to have a basic understanding of Labanotation. First, Labanotation was developed as a way to document movement of any kind. (In comparison, Rasche Notation was developed for Argentine Tango. I haven't looked too closely at it, but from what I have seen it is at least limited to making sense of partner dance steps, and without much thought to notating spacial elements and quality of movement.) Second, Labanotation is VERY complex. You can become certified to use it for movement analysis and receive advanced degrees from institutes devoted to it. It takes a lot to learn it--and a lot to use it. Really, there aren't many dance practitioners I know of who find it a useful system of notation for their daily practice. However, attempts have been made to document dance for posterity using Labanotation. Rasche Notation, on the other hand, seems to have developed as a very practical memory aid.
     
  7. newbie

    newbie Well-Known Member

    I was not aware of the Rasche notation. Like everybody I developped my own notation over the years. Having looked at the link, it seems that something is missing about where the weight is.
     
  8. Me

    Me New Member

    I haven't heard of Rasche notation, but will definitely check out that link.

    But I have to vent... I. hated. Labanotation.

    Most useless and convoluted thing I was forced to learn... ever... in my dance education.
     
  9. Captain Jep

    Captain Jep New Member

    I should just point out that I dont know Thomas Rasche personally blah blah. I do know he's been dancing for a long time though (originally in Berlin in the 90s). Could be the notation is his version of "done it all seen it all - let's see what else we can do".

    Still we could all do with *some* way of keeping decent notes after a class couldnt we?!!
     
  10. DL

    DL Well-Known Member

    Well, I've seen a little mention in web searches of programs that use Laban notation as input, to fully specify how computer-generated actors should move. Is it really rich enough for that purpose? Is Rasche notation?

    Maybe it's just the computer science student in me but that kind of formal specification language seems to hold a lot of possibilities. But I don't know whether they're anything like the kinds of things for which such systems were developed in the first place.
     
  11. Captain Jep

    Captain Jep New Member

    Would be interesting to see it in action.

    Ive just noticed that it has generated an extremely heated debate on the yahoo tango-uk e-group. Having read that I need to go and have a lie down ....

    (systemizers vs freedom fighters)
     
  12. DanceMentor

    DanceMentor Administrator

    This is an old thread, but I was curious if notation is still being used in Argentine tango. To me it seems like there should be a system for documenting, but maybe now with video so widely used it is less important?
     
  13. Lilly_of_the_valley

    Lilly_of_the_valley Well-Known Member

    There is this Argentine dancer Matias Alberto Tripodi, who at present lives in Europe. He recently came up with a new system of notation for tango, and presented a book to that regards. Check it out at:
    www.matiastripodi.net
     
  14. opendoor

    opendoor Well-Known Member

    That did not convince me...
    Notación-Estructural-de-Tango-Matias-Tripodi.jpg
     
  15. Lilly_of_the_valley

    Lilly_of_the_valley Well-Known Member

    Personally, I could not care less about any such system. :) But it seems some do, and still come up with new ones, so here.
     
    Mladenac likes this.
  16. JohnEm

    JohnEm Well-Known Member

    You care enough to look?!

    I'm with Lilley although I wouldn't bother
    to post/publicise any new system nor any
    notation system at all. They are the antithesis
    of improvised social dancing.
     
  17. Lilly_of_the_valley

    Lilly_of_the_valley Well-Known Member

    Matias is also a choreographer and a stage dancer/director, so I guess the notes may be needed in some instances for that kind of work. I know some social dancers also like to take written notes, it helps them learn and process information. I take notes before/after classes sometimes, too, although they are not of specific movements/choreography, and I don't use mnemonic systems, just plain language.
     
  18. DanceMentor

    DanceMentor Administrator

    I take it there has not been an attempt to document the names of steps and techniques in a text book type format?
     
  19. JohnEm

    JohnEm Well-Known Member

    Too many!! Especially considering that the dance,
    at least socially, was passed on person to person,
    dancer to dancer, generation to next generation.

    Commercial show dancing, stage dancing, performance
    and competition dancing are of course another matter entirely.
     
  20. Steve Pastor

    Steve Pastor Moderator Staff Member

    "Gotta Tango" is the closest thing to "text book type format" that I can think of.
     

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