Salsa > Salsa’s Big Lie

Discussion in 'Salsa' started by afroarabano, May 11, 2006.

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  1. dancin/dj

    dancin/dj Member

    this is whats great about salsa, all the people"s of the world dig it, so kudos to the founders from cuba, puerto rico, new york etc.. also its hard (disclaimer not saying everyone) its hard for non latinos(sometimes too feel the same way about salsa etc than non latinos" but that being said salsa music and other types of latin music with the various dances sure has produced some wonderfull dancers from everywhere in the world and they fuse there own ethnic, shall we say style to the table.
     
  2. quixotedlm

    quixotedlm New Member

    interesting..

    i thought that the modern pizza is like modern salsa.. born elsewhere, but taken over by america and changed up to be something very different (and yet the same)...
     
  3. Andresito

    Andresito Member

    BTW this is perfect example of what I was saying...

    • Pizza is from Italy,
    • Italian in NY made another kind of Pizza that is not like in Italy, come to Italy and you'll taste the difference.
    • Other non Italians copied the NY style Pizza and maybe take it to Seattle where they know that as a Pizza, and this Seattle Pizza is not the same as in NY.
    The same you can apply to salsa...

    BTW this is just a way to explain the phenomenom.

    It is perfectly right for a guy in Seattle to eat and enjoy the NY style Pizza and never in his life taste a real Italian one....

    But if a real Italian goes to Seattle and eats that Pizza he simply will say... Hey this is not a Pizza !!

    And maybe if the Seattle guy eats someday a real Italian Pizza, he could maybe find it different as the Pizza he loves and will say .. Hey, this Pizza has no taste. and they not have the 30 different toppings he have at home...

    The same happens with Salsa..
     
  4. tj

    tj New Member

    I love the analogy! :notworth:
     
  5. dancin/dj

    dancin/dj Member

    hey good example andersito and very true,i just returned from italy 3 weeks ago,many americans who have never been would be surprised at the 300+ ways all over italy pizza is made.by the way salsa dancing in italy is very cool in milian and rome, i have dancer friends in rome and milan rome is more into cubano style.
     
  6. dance234

    dance234 New Member

    Another step - pizza became omnipresent in Italy only after its importation and popularization by Americans returning home after WW2.
     
  7. samina

    samina Well-Known Member

    so, so true. some of my worst dancing experiences have been with leaders (ballroom, too) trying to be too complex in their figures & patterns... thereby destroying the sense of connection. and definitely taking me outa my happy place! :D
     
  8. samina

    samina Well-Known Member

    yes... salsa is nyc, is it not? mambo is cuba...
     
  9. tj

    tj New Member

    And NY pizza is nothing like Chicago pizza!
     
  10. samina

    samina Well-Known Member

    thank god... lol :rolleyes:
     
  11. tj

    tj New Member

    And again, what I was complaining about before is that we have the case where a New Yorker is in Chicago complaining about Chicago style pizza, or a Chicagoan (?) is in NYC complaining about NY style pizza not being "real pizza". :wink:
     
  12. kayak

    kayak Active Member

    Yep, I agree with you. The original post was dead on. If a Latino likes going with the flow in basically a freestyle dance called Salsa, all the better. Americans and Europeans are great at precision and reverse engineering. So it seems natural that we would learn differently. We geek out over how much better the same commercials look in HDTV. There is no reason to think we wouldn't geek out on the proper way to turn a lady :wink:
     
  13. salsamale

    salsamale New Member

    While all pizza is nourishing to some degree, it's been a long while since I had a slice that had any real flavour. That's not to say that I can't enjoy the slice that's in front of me. So many fancy toppings, looks pretty, smells good, but the sauce is from a can, and the cheese comes pre-shredded. Still, who can say no to pizza?
     
  14. quixotedlm

    quixotedlm New Member

    Conclusion - Pizza is good. So eat one everyday :uplaugh:
     
  15. Andresito

    Andresito Member

    Go to Italy and eat a Margarita... no toppings at all , just a thin crusty dough made with extra-vergine olive oil, a tomato sauce made with fresh San-Marsano Tomatoes, Mozarella di buffalla and some basil sprout from your garden...

    Delicious !
     
  16. dancedude314

    dancedude314 New Member

    You know, someone from the south would never get away with claiming that the latin community just doesn't "feel" rock and roll. Just something to think about.
     
  17. dancin/dj

    dancin/dj Member

    haaaa true no?who cares where. what"s really important is it really good salsa i mean pizzia lol
     
  18. Don Silver

    Don Silver Member

    FWIW - I have to guess this is because most Europeans tend to respond to the arts in higher numbers compared to the US.

    I believe part of it is we have so much available, and it fragments almost all activities.

    Most promoters can make more money in Europe because they tend to draw bigger crowds and/or people willing to pay more.

    For example, world-class jazz musicians in LA will play in a club and 50-100 people will show up on a great night. The same group can travel to Europe or Japan and there will be 3-8 THOUSAND people showing up to see them.

    Americans tend to have a mild case of ADD. I can listen to baseball from Alaska on the internet this week (my son is actually broadcasting play-by-play there tonight!), watch any of a few hundred channels on my DirecTV box, or do 20 other things this evening.

    We can easily go dancing 6 nights per week in LA, and almost everynight I'll find someone from beginner to very advanced, and have a great time. Nobody worries about missing any specific event or night because there is always next week.

    BTW - I think one of the real catalysts for the current rages are the partner dance TV shows. Off the top of my head I can think of "Dancing with the Stars", "So You Think You Can Dance", and Albert Torres getting his ESPN World Salsa Championships ramped up over the last couple years. I think there was something else, but I can't recall the name.

    Millions of people are watching those shows regularly and a percent of them are saying "that looks like fun... maybe I should try it...". While many will drop out, the new people learning at studios and clubs around LA are higher than they have been in many years. I'm amazed at the numbers that are in the classes these days.

    I may have it all wrong, but Americans tend to be spoiled with too many options.
     
  19. sweavo

    sweavo New Member

    That is soo true. A while back I went to a "retro indie" club here in York, playing (mostly brit) indie and some mod music. I remember starting out thinking how it was so much worse music to dance to. After everyone in the place had had a few drinks you ended up with everyone hugging each other and singing every song word perfect. The dancing was restricted to basic jigging up and down but the arms were raised to the ceiling at all the right moments... I remember thinking at the time "this is the British equivalent of sabor! you can't get this anywhere else!"
     
  20. Andresito

    Andresito Member

    Salsa, and dancing... that is gathering together to have a party, has been allways in Latin countries a cellebration of Life, a moment of Joy in the middle of a not so pleasant existence.

    Think about the slaves... they were suffering, but when they had free time by themselves, they played music and danced, to share the Joy, even if they had little of it.

    Think about poor latin or african countries. People there don't have all the money, comfort and things you have in richer countires... but they have themselves and their joy of living.. and this is what is shared on a party... by dancing.
     
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