General Dance Discussion > The Electric Slide: Who Owns It?

Discussion in 'General Dance Discussion' started by DanceMentor, Mar 21, 2007.

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  1. NYCsDancer

    NYCsDancer New Member

    I answered your questions within your post - it was easier that way

    The Parkers - a sitcom - used the Electric in their 8th show where the daughters move out and have a housewarming party and the mothers crash the party and everyone is doing the Electric - the 22 step original version. that was done in 1998
    Also - the movie The Super with Joe Peschi has a scene where the apartment tenants have a party and they invite The Super to the party and they do the 22 steps. It wasn't until 2000 that movies started coming out with the 18 step variation - and the only difference is the repeat of steps 13-16.
     
  2. NYCsDancer

    NYCsDancer New Member

    Tripod was bought out in 2006 and if you notice - the 1st listing has an asterisk meaning that it was updated on that date.
     
  3. fascination

    fascination Site Moderator Staff Member

    any claim of copyright, patent or trademark...is only as good as the attorney who wrote it up...any claim without such has virtually no enforceability...if you have very well documented evidence and some claim that is able to transcend obviousness, get a good attorney and give it a whirl...otherwise you are just baying at the moon
     
  4. fascination

    fascination Site Moderator Staff Member

    again, we are all wasting our breath here...person with claim will have their day in court if they choose...beyond that, they are SOL
     
  5. NYCsDancer

    NYCsDancer New Member

    Not at all - the dance that most people are doing is my choreography with steps 17-20 omitted. The rocking step - forward and backward are repeated.
    I created the dance with 3-3s, 2-2s a 1 and a hop what they are doing is 3-3s, 1-2, a 1 and a turn (or a turn and a scuff)
     
  6. NYCsDancer

    NYCsDancer New Member


    You are incorrect - in 1976 that law were different that they are today. The 1909 act is the law that was used until 1978 when the 1976 law took effect.
    At the time I created the dance (1976) the law in effect was that all you had to do was have it printed with the words copyright, the (c), The date, and your name printed on the work. I have this. The 1976 law - which did not take effect until 1978, changed that so that all copyright material had to be submitted to The Library of Congress and receive a REGISTRATION NUMBER.
    Those who held copyrights prior to 1978 were given 25 years to file for a number...... unfortunately, being broke most of my life, I was unable to file what was told to me was a $300. fee for filing. When I noticed that the 25 years were running out - I finally got around to filing and unfortunately for me have had to refile the paperwork 6 times so far. The last was just submitted by my lawyer only last week.
     
  7. fascination

    fascination Site Moderator Staff Member

    whether or not I am correct will be determined by your outcome...not by your ability to make and file the claim....
     
  8. fascination

    fascination Site Moderator Staff Member

    I wish you luck...and good attorneys...
     
  9. Genesius Redux

    Genesius Redux New Member

    We ppl?

    Do me a favor--save the testimony for direct, okay? What I said I stand by; we're not talking about a ballet here. I've worked in the theatrical world for well over 30 years, and I'm also well aware of current trends in intellectual property. You think you can convince a judge that a copyright applies to any individual steps, however creatively you may want to name them, more power to you. But you might want to bear in mind what happened to Parker Brothers when they thought they had a monopoly on Monopoly.

    But the essence of what I really want to say is this--I'm unaware of anything in my previous post that made reference to the actual case--which leaves me wondering why I get the honor of being quoted in a comment about how "[we] ppl" are eager to "tear [you] apart" when we "don't even know the true facts" (as distinguished, presumably, from the false ones).

    I'm perfectly capable of tearing someone apart in print. I have not, as yet, done so. I'm not sure it's worth my professional time.

    Good luck in court.
     
  10. fascination

    fascination Site Moderator Staff Member

    a copyright costs virtually nothing...a patent or trademark is a different issue...so starving or not, that really isn't much of a factor...nonetheless...if you have intellectual property that is very unique and provable and you can demonstrate loss of income due to unfair use, and you have good lawyers you will be fine...and what any of us thinks is irrelevant...
     
  11. tanya_the_dancer

    tanya_the_dancer Well-Known Member

    Then you probably should contact every line dancing teacher out there to make sure they are aware of that. Also, don't forget aerobics instructors in all the gyms out there - they are known to incorporate dance moves in their routines. :) Like ppl said in another thread on this (there was one under dance articles), it just might kill the thing.
     
  12. Vince A

    Vince A Active Member

    I did a very simplified version of it in the 60s . . .
     
  13. LindyKeya

    LindyKeya Member

    Amen! Any self-respecting teacher would just teach a different line dance, rather than actually pay to use the electric slide. There's better out there; right now "your" "choreography" just happens to be convenient. Charge and it will disappear completely.
     
  14. kayak

    kayak Active Member

    Who would have ever imagined ... the line dance site claims to have 36506 dances, 8662 choreographers, 19910 songs. It is hard to imagine there are even 36,000 different ways to move our feet back and forth? I wonder how often choreographers accidentally duplicate part of someone else's dance? How many actually get danced outside line dance night? I'm not sure I can come up with more than 6-8 in my area?
     
  15. NYCsDancer

    NYCsDancer New Member

    I was told it was $300. back in the day - and when I started filing in 2001 - I paid a lawyer in Seattle $950. to file - and it wasn't until the paperwork was returned three times from the inspector who finally called me personally to say that my lawyer didn't know what he was doing and would I let him fill out the paperwork so that he could approve it that I found out that I could have done it myself for $30.00 - I was ripped off.....
    I then hired another lawyer in Dallas who charged me $800. just to look at the case and then she did nothing at all for the money and I ended up firing her and finding a third lawyer - who sent me a contract stating that he wanted 33 1/3% of all receipts but would not go to court with me.
    I now have a GOOD LAWYER who is taking the case for free but is asking 50% of the receipts. I say - better 50% of something than 100% of nothing....Ric
     
  16. NYCsDancer

    NYCsDancer New Member

    the only difference between my choreography and what the rest are doing is the repeated forward - backward step (13-16) It's supposed to be repeated - and they leave out the repeat. THAT'S IT!
     
  17. NYCsDancer

    NYCsDancer New Member

    I would rather have it not taught than have it taught incorrectly.
     
  18. NYCsDancer

    NYCsDancer New Member

    Many of the dances being taught have used my choreography as a base line and added "improvements" to my basic step or deleted from the basic step
    that's why many of these line dance ppl are up in arms over this - because half of their dances would fall under my copyright and that would kill linedancing completely. I know of at least 18 dances right now that would fall under this catagory.
     
  19. NYCsDancer

    NYCsDancer New Member

    I would love to see the step chart for that....... I'm 60 - and to my knowledge there was no such dance until I created it in '76.....
     
  20. fascination

    fascination Site Moderator Staff Member

    as long as he is taking it on contingency...and 50 percent of something is more than you have right now...but I think you have a tough case...i would love to know the case law on this...but, I would advise you not to share much else on a public forum as it could be used against you...truly you might want to cool it on here...
     
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