Tango Argentino > Videos > Troilo, the LCM between the worlds

Discussion in 'Videos' started by opendoor, Apr 11, 2012.

  1. opendoor

    opendoor Well-Known Member

    dont you think this could be Nuevo, too?

    youtube.com/watch?v=MqUwK-ENAjU


    Anibal Troilo was Piazzolla´s bando teacher.
     
  2. AndaBien

    AndaBien Well-Known Member

    Maybe. My question is how would you dance to it? As for me, never. I wouldn't even try, and I don't suppose Troilo thought anyone would.
     
  3. UKDancer

    UKDancer Well-Known Member

    I'd never seen that - very interesting, and a better version, arguably, than the commercial recording from 1968. Who is the guitarist?

    One side-effect of dancing to (or attempting to dance to) alternative tango is that we are more ready to experiment, perhaps? It wouldn't trouble me to have a go - it is Troilo through and through - and I love his music-making. I usually reckon that Recuerdos De Bohemia from 1946 marked the end of his dance music, but even had he recorded nothing at all after 1941 he would still have been a giant among the greats.
     
  4. dchester

    dchester Moderator Staff Member

    Sure, but then again, what songs couldn't you dance nuevo to?


    On a side note, what are song of the songs and/or albums of Triolo that people really like. I like some of his later stuff (the more dramatic stuff) that people don't usually dance to. I also like a small number of his traditional stuff that I've heard, so I'm thinking I haven't heard most of his best stuff as of yet.
     
  5. opendoor

    opendoor Well-Known Member

    ;)
    Aníbal Arias

    While sitting. I am still with crutches. ;)
     
  6. AndaBien

    AndaBien Well-Known Member

    So, you'll dance to anything at all.
     
  7. UKDancer

    UKDancer Well-Known Member

    Arguably, nuevo was a musical development, and not a dance style, but the word has come to be used in a very loose way.

    As for Troilo, I'd say his best work was early. The two 1938 sides (Tinta Verde & Comme Il Faut) are both tremendous, but nothing else appeared until 1941. Just about everything he recorded until about 1944/45 is wonderful, and his partnership with Fiorentina is matchless. The early discs in the RCA Victor series of 26 are well worth seeking out, for the best available sound (frequently awful, unfortunately) and the best coverage. Of his later work, I like the material on the 'From Argentina to the World' series (late 1950s): the best performances of his late style. The classic album 'For Export' is a must have (for the stereo sound and some very good individual tracks), but much of his late stuff is just concert music that we have learned to dance to.

    Personally I can't get on with the Troilo-Grela quartet material - but it was never intended for dancing, surely. For my money, if I could just have Troilo, Pugliese & Di Sarli from 1940-45 you could keep the rest. What was there left to say, even though they kept on churning out stuff well after you'd have got yourself arrested for trying to dance in BsAs? I'm a musical heretic: I love the best of the Guardia Vieja, can't be bothered with D'Arienzo after 1939, and can take or leave anything from the 1950s (and generally, leave Di Sarli). Ho Hum!
     
  8. AndaBien

    AndaBien Well-Known Member

    I like his earlier recordings. I have Del Tiempo Guapo ('41-'43) and El Inmortal ('41). Both are much better than his later stuff, which I find uninspiring.
     
  9. tangobro

    tangobro Active Member

    just checked my mp3 player for the stuff I usually listen to. I have Troilo's "Cachirulo", "milongueando del 40" & "Palomita Blanca" from a cd of various artists given to all new students by my 1st tango teachers. I also have "Quejas de Bandoneon" from the album 40 Tangos Imprescindibles - Juan D'Arienzo, Osvaldo Puglese, Anibal Troilo. Another is "Te Consejo Que Me Olvides" from the album History of Tango, Anibal Troilo - Francisco Fiorentino, Recordings 1939 - 1944. There's other Troilo stuff I like, but don't remember the titles.
     
  10. dchester

    dchester Moderator Staff Member

    Those are some of the ones commonly played around these parts as well.

    "Te aconsejo que me olvides" is one of my favorites. I just have trouble finding many Troilos that I consider "tanda worthy" (I'm rather picky about songs I'll play when DJing). I suspect that I just haven't looked hard enough, so I've decided to work at it a bit more.
     
  11. Xenophon

    Xenophon Member

    Troilo

    Ten beautiful Troilo valses:
    Acordándome De Vos
    Flor De Lino
    Llorarás, Llorarás
    Palomita Blanca
    Romance De Barrio
    Soñar y Nada Más
    Temblando
    Tu Diagnóstico
    Un Placer
    Valsecito Amigo

    I started writing out favourite Troilo tangos, but there are just way too many good ones. Just about everyone knows La Maleva, Malena, Percal etc. I second UKDancer's recommendation for the early discs in the RCA Victor series, especially Tinta Roja and Yo Soy El Tango; they're easy to find.
     
  12. opendoor

    opendoor Well-Known Member

  13. UKDancer

    UKDancer Well-Known Member

    Don't overlook the milongas.

    From 1941 with Fiorentino:
    • Del Tiempo Guapo
    • Con Toda La Voz Que Tengo
    • Mano Brava
    And from 1942/4, also with Fiorentino:
    • Ficha de Oro
    • Papá Baltasar
    • El Desafio
    And from 1943/44 with Marino:
    • El Barrio Del Tambor
    • Milonga En Rojo
    • Con Permiso
    I only have one instrumental from that period, De Pura Cepa (1942), but it is tremendous.
     
  14. bordertangoman

    bordertangoman Well-Known Member

    how could you miss La Trampera?
     
  15. UKDancer

    UKDancer Well-Known Member

    I prefer the earlier recordings. I do have two Troilo versions of La Trampera, though. The one with the orchestra from the early 50s is good fun, but I don't have anything else of his from that period to put it with, and the sound quality is very poor for its date.

    Vol 14 of the RCA Victor series has the Troilo-Grela Quartet version from 1962, but again, there's nothing comparable to put it with. The late quartet version on Vol 23 of the RCA Victor set (from 1968/9) is probably the best of them, and I ordered the disc a few days ago, but it hasn't arrived yet. Suggestions to partner that up would be welcome.
     
  16. bordertangoman

    bordertangoman Well-Known Member

    Zorzal: Di Sarli/Rufino
    Milonga de Buenos Aires (Canaro)
     
  17. bordertangoman

    bordertangoman Well-Known Member

    You aren't going to play that many milongas over the course of evening; so why go for what are largely unfamiliar (in the uk) and second rate milongas; the idea is to get people to dance and enjoy themselves, (not to show off your music collection)

    I listened to that list. i know half, but they wouldnt get me onto the dance floor.
     
  18. UKDancer

    UKDancer Well-Known Member

    The repertoire of really well-known milongas is pretty small, and I tire of hearing the same predictable stuff again and again. But these are not second rate: although you are as entitled to your view as I am to mine.

    Troilo is an acquired taste. His music is challenging, subtle and multi-layered. If I had to choose just one orchestra to dance to, it would be his.
     
  19. bordertangoman

    bordertangoman Well-Known Member


    I agree that the repertoire of well known milongas is small,20-30??? but there is still enough good stuff in there not to dredge up second rate stuff.

    but that is beside the point; I'm not having a go at Troilo: I just think there are better tracks for dancing milonga to. if you do one milong tanda per hour dancers dont want unfamiliar stuff.

    Se Dice De Mi; Tito Moralla is great fun.
    Sacas Chipas; de Caro is melodic
    Yo Soy de San Telmo
    and I'm sure Sixela could suggest more.
    And I am always finding new things In Milonga de Mis Amores because I never play it, and it feels fresh and interesting when other people do.


    Milonga del Ayer by whassiname is far more of a challenge
     
  20. AndaBien

    AndaBien Well-Known Member

    I agree. One of my pet peeves is DJs who play poor quality dance tunes just because they're unusual. After all, as soon as it's been played a few times it becomes familiar, and then people quit playing it because it's no good to dance to. Of course, there are shades of gray.
     

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