Tango Argentino > What are you working on? v3

Discussion in 'Tango Argentino' started by AndaBien, Dec 5, 2011.

  1. Subliminal

    Subliminal Well-Known Member

    I'm kind of confused about what a quebrada is. I was showed once by
    Oscar and Georgina, but to me it looked like a very stylized front ocho with some vertical motion. Is that what it is, or is it something else?
     
  2. bordertangoman

    bordertangoman Well-Known Member

    basically its creating a shape; so its very prevalent in escenario.

    the shape usually involves stopping in midstep and sinking and twisting, possibly making the woman lean back.
     
  3. Subliminal

    Subliminal Well-Known Member

    First private lesson in a while! Fixed some things that had gotten sloppy. Worked on dancing rhythmic tangos. I really like the melodic stuff better... Unless it is milonga. Heh. But I think I have a better idea on how to make them fun now. We worked on dancing small and sharp in the staccato parts of the song, then dancing with longer slower steps over melodic breaks. It is very easy to just dance continuous over a rhythmic tango, but there are parts where the melody takes over or when a pause is appropriate. I think the key to making rhythmic tangos more fun for me are to seek out those moments.

    It's funny... I think in my very first lesson, my first teacher told me that the walk should vary based on the music. And the length and quality of the step can be musical elements. But almost three years later, I am still working on it. Am I better at it? Probably. I hope so.

    Another thing we discussed... The phrase "it's all about her". We're sometimes told that as beginner leaders. But is it really helpful? Really, the truth is it's NOT about her. It's about the leader clearly and strongly representing the music THROUGH the movement of the follower. That is lead/follow relationship broken down to the smallest part. Everything else, emotion, connection, builds on that basic concept.

    Or so I believe right now. I may change my mind tomorrow. ;)
     
  4. AndaBien

    AndaBien Well-Known Member

    For rhythmic tangos I like to just crank on the rhythm, not monotonously, but mechanically with some variation, then throw in some relief from the cranking long enough to catch ones breath, then crank again.

    I like the idea of giving her a dance. To me, that's what it's all about. Sometimes I think about it like a musician playing a violin - the leader evokes the music from his partner.
     
  5. Subliminal

    Subliminal Well-Known Member

    That sounds like a good plan!

    I don't disagree, that is the point of dancing. Sometimes it's good to think, "What did I do that inspired her to do X".
     
  6. dchester

    dchester Moderator Staff Member

    Yeah, I always reserve the right to change my mind.

    [​IMG]
     
  7. AndaBien

    AndaBien Well-Known Member

    I use to, but I changed my mind.
     
  8. AndaBien

    AndaBien Well-Known Member

  9. bordertangoman

    bordertangoman Well-Known Member

    did a workshop with leading crossing steps in the giro in both directions, getting the clarity of the lead followed by a small sacada (turning CCW) and then crossing in front L to R, while the follower crosses in front and sidestep. the last bit in double time.
     

  10. Do you know what is the difference between quebradas and cortes?
     
  11. opendoor

    opendoor Well-Known Member

    That could be a quebrada but rather an unusual one. Sounds like the 0:05 thing in the following vid


    But in general quebrada is an umbrella term for all poses or moves with a bended (forward, back or to the sides) backbone. Milongueros once used that kind of poses in order to get a glimpse into the décolleté or to get a bit closer and in direct contact to the body. In those days women used to be wrapped in dozens of layers.

    More examples

    0:21 of {oops - link on tangoevolution.com seems to have evolved so much so that we can't even find it anymore!}
    1:39 of
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 23, 2017

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