Tango Argentino > What Shoes?

Discussion in 'Tango Argentino' started by aimerrouge, Feb 27, 2008.

  1. Light Sleeper

    Light Sleeper New Member

    I've only tango-ed in ballroom type sandals which are very soft and flexibe, maybe that's what I don't like - maybe the more sturdy tango shoe but with a suede sole added on isn't so bad? Either that or maybe CIF are trying to tap into the ballroom market :confused:
     
  2. Light Sleeper

    Light Sleeper New Member

    Just got an email from Kathleen at Diva Boutique - it was a mistake - they ARE leather soles - phew!! :)
    Apols! for creating a mini shoe drama!!!
     
  3. bastet

    bastet Active Member

    they'd need to add a lot more padding and lower the heel height!
    Glad to hear it was an entry error!
     
  4. spectator

    spectator Member

    I wore ballet flats for two years before I felt confident enough to wear heels and either way is fine. The upside of darcos/comme il faut/neo tago is that you can wear them anywhere as normal dressy shoes. They are well made and very individual so I wear them any time need nice shoes, weddings, parties, milongas etc. I've even worn them on grass and the soles were still fine for dancing.
     
  5. Peaches

    Peaches Well-Known Member

    Yup. Grass, puddles...it's all good. Just let them dry and then scuff them on rough concrete and you're good to go.
     
  6. bordertangoman

    bordertangoman Well-Known Member

  7. spectator

    spectator Member

    Hooray! They make comme il faut look cheap! I can justify myself now next time my bank manager says "£115 [$230] on shoes?!!!"
     
  8. Joe

    Joe Well-Known Member

    Not just for the ladies. ;)
     
  9. bordertangoman

    bordertangoman Well-Known Member

    what are you implying? ;)
     
  10. jennyisdancing

    jennyisdancing Active Member

    I hear you, but luckily I am a good bargain shopper so I can treat my feet - and admirer's eyes - for a lot less than that overpriced pair. :tongue:

    Finding fashion shoes is not hard, but finding good dance shoes is. Everyone keeps saying leather-sole shoes are best for AT, but my lone pair of CIF's are too high-heeled for constant use, and I can't afford another, lower-heeled pair, so I decided to try my suede-sole latin ballroom shoes. They work great, and they are far more affordable. I actually like the soft, flexible soles, even though the harder soles are the norm for tango. I'm used to softer soles from doing salsa and ballroom, and my feet are strong from earlier ballet training as well, so the solution works for me. Might not be as suited to someone who has not developed their foot strength.
     
  11. bordertangoman

    bordertangoman Well-Known Member

    Some ladies might be suade by this ;)
     
  12. Peaches

    Peaches Well-Known Member

    That was horrible, btm. You should be drug into the street and shot for that. :)
     
  13. Joe

    Joe Well-Known Member

    Drugged into the street?

    What, you don't like women in heels?
     
  14. Peaches

    Peaches Well-Known Member

    That too.
     
  15. bastet

    bastet Active Member

    I've tried on some of the newer line of shoes from Tango Brujo, and they are using a super flexible sole with full suede for their pratice line, very comfortable...and probably on the premise that any place a person goes to practice will have suitable flooring for it, whereas not all places where tango is danced socially may have a floor where suede works well, but leather does. Tradition, I suppose you call it.

    An inflexible sole and very high heel is hard on the feet in general. I have used latin shoes in the past for practicing and found them very comfortable because of that flexiblility and actually find it harder on the feet to work with an inflexible sole, trying to get better foot articulation, so I'd be tempted to say the opposite would be true when it comes to foot strength as foot articulation in latin shoes is very easy to do but not so easy in hard soles so soft soled shoes would make for good training shoes.

    I think the ballroom people also have the foot cushioning thing nailed down tight, whereas the kind of stiff and dumpy padding in many tango shoes seems to still be from the Dark Ages. I liked the new ones from Tango Brujo I tried. The padding was much more modern, so maybe things will start to change in that area for other brands too.
     
  16. bordertangoman

    bordertangoman Well-Known Member

    I've never tried it;)
     
  17. bordertangoman

    bordertangoman Well-Known Member

    sho' nuff, but I couldn't resist such an easy pun
    its like shooting fish in a barrel;
    but why would you have fish in a barrel?
    Oh they're just waiting for their bicycles.
     
  18. Joe

    Joe Well-Known Member

    Have you tried supplemental cushioning? Something like Pump Pals, maybe?
     
  19. Peaches

    Peaches Well-Known Member

    Do you have a good link for those shoes? (I can find the web page, but the link for shoes doesn't seem to want to work.)

    I'm just surprised you've found padding in AT shoes, period. (Although I haven't really noticed many AT shoes other than CIF, Darcos, and NeoTango.)

    Although I will say, that if having padding in my shoes like ballroom shoes also means they end up as horribly uncomfortable as either of my pairs of ballroom shoes, then I'll happily go without the padding. No amount of padding can make up for how my foot feels after an hour in ballroom shoes.
     
  20. bastet

    bastet Active Member

    I usually buy my Comme Il Fauts a little big and add a metatarsel pad. It just irks me that I have to figure that in to every single pair of shoes I ever consider buying. ANother reason I don't like to buy before I try. You never know which brands need extra "help" and which don't.
     

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