Swing Discussion Boards > When Anchoring in WCS

Discussion in 'Swing Discussion Boards' started by Spitfire, Oct 14, 2004.

  1. Spitfire

    Spitfire Well-Known Member

    Ok, when the leads anchors at the end in WCS isn't he suppose to stop the follows backward momentum right at that end? And if there's a strong tug from the follower at this point is this because she is going back too far with big steps?
     
  2. jon

    jon Member

    Possibly - or maybe she's letting her body fall backwards, or jerking to a stop instead of easing out (though this is more in the lead's domain), or keeping her arm straight and not having any shock adsorber as a result, or can't maintain a constant connection for some other reason.

    Also, I'd disagree that the leader is supposed to "stop her momentum". Leading WCS is not so much about creating momentum, as about inviting and redirecting it. If you think otherwise, just try "stopping the momentum" of even a 90 lb. woman moving at a brisk walk who doesn't want to stop, or try moving her from a dead stop to a brisk walk forward without her being willing to go. Once you've done that, do it again 3 seconds later. And again, and again, and again for the duration of a dance - or until your shoulders and back give out, which may be first :)
     
  3. etchuck

    etchuck New Member

    The more advanced you get in WCS, the less the leader should "anchor in place". At that point it is supposed to be more like "decelerating her momentum" gradually. The anchor step becomes the "adjustment" step to return to the connection you want to move into your next figure.
     
  4. Spitfire

    Spitfire Well-Known Member

    What I thought I had been taught is during the final counts when the leader is anchoring and the follower is still going backwards that he is to "signal" her to stop going backwards right at the final count by keeping his arms still and not extending them very much. This is what I meant and it does work like that if the follower is not taking large steps.
     
  5. etchuck

    etchuck New Member

    True, but if the follower does take larger steps, you adjust your anchor steps to slow her down. You shouldn't feel any sharp "tugging" but rather you should be sure that the connection/leverage you get is your signal that she slows down. She has some responsiblity in establishing the connection if she goes crazy with her steps.
     
  6. Spitfire

    Spitfire Well-Known Member

    What I've been doing is moving forward on my anchor and/or extending my arm when this occurs.
     
  7. DWise1

    DWise1 Well-Known Member

    Being a lead, I don't remember exactly, but from what I do remember of what our follows are being taught, in an 8-count move where their foot is on 6 is where they are to anchor (the precise move in question is an outside whip, AKA "whip with an outside turn"). In that move, they are taught that where their foot is on 6 is where they are to turn and anchor.

    Similarly, in an underarm turn where they are on 4 is where they turn and anchor.

    So the idea that we leads are to decellerate the follows is kind of novel to me (with about 1 year experience in WCS). Mainly we try to control her anchoring distance from us by controlling where she is when she turns to start her anchor.
     
  8. jon

    jon Member

    Good response. Possibly she isn't responding correctly to your lead, or possibly she's just moving further than you expect due to long legs or such. Better to adapt then for both of you to suffer for 3:30. Also, people with different backgrounds are likely to expect different amounts of weight, for example traditionally country-trained WCS dancers were likely to expect a much heavier lead than swing-trained WCS dancers.
     
  9. jon

    jon Member

    The thing is that if the follow automatically turns on 4, or 6, or whatever count depending on the pattern they think is being led, the dance is no longer a lead-follow dance. Suppose the leader wants to put an extra spin into the outside whip, or extend the UAT down the slot for two counts, or stop in side-by-side position on 4 and groove a bit?

    So as people get fancier in the dance it's important that they lead the follower to "turn and anchor", it isn't just an automatic response by a follower.
     
  10. Spitfire

    Spitfire Well-Known Member

    There is also an issue concerning follows who have very tight arms and shoulders. This does not neccessarily make the lady difficult to dance with and it happens rarely, but when I have encountered problems with the lady feeling discomfort with a turn it has been with one who's arms are very tight, but not all the time. However, I've never had this from a follower who is very flexible.

    So where this is concerned it is easy for me to assume that either I'm doing something unwittingly at that moment with that particular lady or it's a problem with something she's doing or not doing.
     

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