American Ballroom Shadow Position

#1
I was hoping to hear from a couple of people about how you think of frame and connection while in shadow position. I assume there are multiple ways that you can take hold or position, so wondering how you go about connecting normally.

Also, I wonder how you made Dance shadow socially versus competitively. I recall being in a group class once where I need to place my right hand on the ladies right rib cage which is somewhat blind, and as we changed partners I was dealing with ladies of different heights. Fortunately I was successful in always placing my hand in a good position so maybe it is not such a big deal but seems like it might be a little less suitable to teach the average person to take hold this way for social dancing.
 
#2
Oh, and one more thing…
If you were to construct a syllabus composed only of shadow figures, what might be the first five or so figures that you would put on that syllabus? (Ex waltz/foxtrot)
 

dlliba10

Well-Known Member
#3
Oh, and one more thing…
If you were to construct a syllabus composed only of shadow figures, what might be the first five or so figures that you would put on that syllabus? (Ex waltz/foxtrot)
1. Open right
2. Open right
3. Open right
4. Open right
5. Open right
 

Dr Dance

Well-Known Member
#5
1. Has anyone mentioned the open right box yet? (All smooth dances and open quickstep "!!")
2. Progressive open twinkles (spirals). My syllabus figure would have three plus an exit.
3. Progressive change step forward or backward that dances very similar to a closed twinkle.
4. Open left box.
5. Open twinkle to ripple chasse (waltz and quickstep).
 
#6
1. Has anyone mentioned the open right box yet? (All smooth dances and open quickstep "!!")
2. Progressive open twinkles (spirals). My syllabus figure would have three plus an exit.
3. Progressive change step forward or backward that dances very similar to a closed twinkle.
4. Open left box.
5. Open twinkle to ripple chasse (waltz and quickstep).
What is a ripple chasse?
 

JudeMorrigan

Well-Known Member
#7
I generally try to avoid shadow position when dancing socially. I was spoiled dancing with a tall instructor for years, and I found the odds of misplacing my right hand on the transition into shadow during one-off dances with shorter partners was unacceptably high. While I like to think that I'm well-enough known in the community that people would correctly parse such things as accidents, I'd prefer simpler dances to coming off as Creepy McCreeperson.
 

cornutt

Well-Known Member
#8
I don't do a lot of shadow socially either. Not because I worry particularly about hand placement (I'll put my right hand on her right shoulder if I have doubts), but because I find it hard to floorcraft on a crowded floor when in shadow. Plus it freaks out less experienced follows to be in shadow.

However, in showcase routines, we do a lot of shadow. I actually think of the primary connection point as being at our hips. She should be a little forward of me so that the front edge of my right hip is on the back edge of her left hip. The second point of connection is my right hand on her right side rib cage. Our left hands are together, but that's tertiary, and I really only use it for leading her back to closed at the end of the figure. Other that that, the left hand hold is really only for looks, because it looks weird if you don't have them together.
 

Dr Dance

Well-Known Member
#9
What is a ripple chasse?
A ripple chasse is a chasse with shape... first a strong right shape on the second step, then moving to a left shape on the fourth step. The illusion is that the top half and middle are "rippling" while the bottom half remains steady. For the waltz, the chasse can hook behind on the third step, but doesn't have to do so. The quickstep version closes feet like the "normal" chasse.

During the following video, a lady instructor attempts to teach the waltz ripple chasse (from a promenade position, not shadow!).


In the next video, instructor Egils Smagris and his partner demonstrate a waltz sequence that includes the ripple chasse (with hook).

 
Last edited:
#10
A ripple chasse is a chasse with shape... first a strong right shape on the second step, then moving to a left shape on the fourth step. The illusion is that the top half and middle are "rippling" while the bottom half remains steady. For the waltz, the chasse can hook behind on the third step, but doesn't have to do so. The quickstep version closes feet like the "normal" chasse.

During the following video, a lady instructor attempts to teach the waltz ripple chasse (from a promenade position, not shadow!).


In the next video, instructor Egils Smagris and his partner demonstrate a waltz sequence that includes the ripple chasse (with hook).

Ok, I
Actually did something like that is my class tonight but I call it a grape vine (in shadow). Instead of closing the feet, cross behind and face DWaLOD.
 

Dance Ads

Top