Ballroom style

AndaBien

Well-Known Member
...There was one guy I danced with a couple of times a few years ago... I had the absolute hardest time following him AT ALL when I started. I'd gone for the usual-around-here straight-on embrace, and just nothing felt right. I mean, seriously everything felt hella off. It had me seriously doubting myself. And then one time--still not sure how, if I adjusted, or we opened-then-closed and I ended up in a different position--I ended up sort of off to his right side with a pretty significant V-opening...and suddenly everything became easy. The leads were crystal clear, movement was easy, things just flowed. Strange how that happens sometimes.
It can take a few dances to get familiar with a new partner, even when you are both used to the same embrace. Sometimes I sort of enjoy that period of wondering what's going on, trying to figure it out. Then I also enjoy the moment when you do get things adjusted and the connection jells.
 

pygmalion

Well-Known Member
Go ahead and start one, if you can't find an existing one already.


I'll look and will start one, if I can't find one. In spite of (or perhaps because of) the generally argumentative (usually in a good way) nature of this forum, I am really ... started to say intrigued, but seduced is probably a better word ... by tango. I need to find out more. :)
 

newbie

Well-Known Member
Well not around newbie, but plenty of other people are fine with discussing it.

To make it crystal clear, I heard Carlos (from Carlos & Rosa) explain in a lecture about tango styles that there is no VU style. It closes the matters, unless you have heard a higher tango authority explain the opposite. And you haven't, have you? And to be crystal-clear again, your second-rates jokes aren't valid arguments. "plenty of people" are wrong in this case, and I would suggest you just admit you were wrong too.
 

UKDancer

Well-Known Member
To make it crystal clear, I heard Carlos (from Carlos & Rosa) explain in a lecture about tango styles that there is no VU style. It closes the matters, unless you have heard a higher tango authority explain the opposite. And you haven't, have you? And to be crystal-clear again, your second-rates jokes aren't valid arguments. "plenty of people" are wrong in this case, and I would suggest you just admit you were wrong too.
I don't accept Carlos & Rosa as having any general authority in relation to anything. Tango is not that dance. My tango is mine, and yours is yours. They no doubt have their own too, and those people who live and dance in VU have their own. Just as dialects change from one side of a city to another, I'd be very suprised, indeed, if this wasn't equally true of the styles of dancing.

True, VU is a marketing label as well as a way of dancing, but I recognise it when I see it: which is odd for something that doesn't exist.
 

bordertangoman

Well-Known Member
To make it crystal clear, I heard Carlos (from Carlos & Rosa) explain in a lecture about tango styles that there is no VU style. It closes the matters, unless you have heard a higher tango authority explain the opposite. And you haven't, have you? And to be crystal-clear again, your second-rates jokes aren't valid arguments. "plenty of people" are wrong in this case, and I would suggest you just admit you were wrong too.
VU is rapidly becoming like Schroedingers Cat. it might be alive or dead or both bt you dont know until you dance it or see someone else dance it...
 
To make it crystal clear, I heard Carlos (from Carlos & Rosa) explain in a lecture about tango styles that there is no VU style. It closes the matters, unless you have heard a higher tango authority explain the opposite. And you haven't, have you?
Whether it "exists" or not, it was clearly used mainly as a marketing term to hype up teachers around 2009-2010 in the London area. And the reason I know this was mainly hype is because it's now out of fashion - no-one's advertising it any more.

Whilst I suspect there are a set of loose conventions which can be defined as VU style, I honestly couldn't be bothered to worry about it. Because it's not important.

And to be crystal-clear again, your second-rates jokes aren't valid arguments.
How about first-rate jokes? :)
 

bordertangoman

Well-Known Member
Whether it "exists" or not, it was clearly used mainly as a marketing term to hype up teachers around 2009-2010 in the London area. And the reason I know this was mainly hype is because it's now out of fashion - no-one's advertising it any more.

Whilst I suspect there are a set of loose conventions which can be defined as VU style, I honestly couldn't be bothered to worry about it. Because it's not important.


How about first-rate jokes? :)
also in Brum, goodness they needed it.

I agree, not worth worrying about it.

all your jokes are first rate..but there are always hecklers..:D
 

dchester

Moderator
Staff member
To make it crystal clear, I heard Carlos (from Carlos & Rosa) explain in a lecture about tango styles that there is no VU style. It closes the matters, unless you have heard a higher tango authority explain the opposite. And you haven't, have you? And to be crystal-clear again, your second-rates jokes aren't valid arguments. "plenty of people" are wrong in this case, and I would suggest you just admit you were wrong too.
You can pretend the name doesn't exist all you want. It doesn't change the fact that people use it often, whether you like it or not. That's how new words/terms are created. Someone coins the term and people start using it. Neither you, (nor Carlos & Rosa) can control that.

This same (and IMO silly) argument applies to other things/names as well. I've heard people say the ocho cortado was named wrong, I've heard the "change of direction" or "change of front" is named wrong (with some people now calling it alterations).

VU style has a meaning. Your attempts to define terminology are no more successful than Jan's attempts to do so.
 

Zoopsia59

Well-Known Member
To make it crystal clear, I heard Carlos (from Carlos & Rosa) explain in a lecture about tango styles that there is no VU style. It closes the matters, unless you have heard a higher tango authority explain the opposite. And you haven't, have you? And to be crystal-clear again, your second-rates jokes aren't valid arguments. "plenty of people" are wrong in this case, and I would suggest you just admit you were wrong too.
Well, I'm glad that's finally cleared up... crystally..

(does that mean it's fragile, priceless, or just reflects a lot of colors when light hits it?)

You heard him folks... not only is there no VU style, all those plenty people willing to discuss it are WRONG to do so, so shut up.

No discussing of VU anymore and that's final.

(hey, it's not my fault... blame Carlos and Rosa... I don't know who they are, but clearly I'm supposed to listen to them, but I'd rather make 4th rate jokes)
 

bordertangoman

Well-Known Member
Well, I'm glad that's finally cleared up... crystally..

(does that mean it's fragile, priceless, or just reflects a lot of colors when light hits it?)

You heard him folks... not only is there no VU style, all those plenty people willing to discuss it are WRONG to do so, so shut up.

No discussing of VU anymore and that's final.

(hey, it's not my fault... blame Carlos and Rosa... I don't know who they are, but clearly I'm supposed to listen to them, but I'd rather make 4th rate jokes)
I know why - here's a quote from Horacio Godoy on
VU......
", it's about the musicality and the quality of the movement. It's about a wealth of knowledge so subtle and complex that for the ordinary eye is imperceptible. "
 

JohnEm

Well-Known Member
I know why - here's a quote from Horacio Godoy on
VU......
", it's about the musicality and the quality of the movement. It's about a wealth of knowledge so subtle and complex that for the ordinary eye is imperceptible. "
Yes - though it's a very old quote now, over 10 years ago.

And on the topic of VU and Carlos & Rosa Perez, here is an extract
of an advert for their teaching in London last year:

Class and Performance on Friday 29 October

On Friday 29 October Carlos & Rosa Perez teach the Intermediate class. They perform at 10:30pm.

Carlos & Rosa Perez are resident teachers at Sunderland club, centre of Villa Urquiza style in Buenos Aires. Known as "Maestros de Maestros" they have taught many of the current generation of professional tango dancers and teachers. Their practica at Sunderland club draws huge numbers of young pupils.

Carlos started dancing tango in 1953 at the age of 13 and began performing only two years later. On marrying Rosa he retired from professional dancing for 30 years but he and Rosa continued to dance socially. In 1994 he returned to tango professionally with Rosa and they have continued to teach and perform since then.

You can see a YouTube video of Carlos and Rosa dancing to Poema at their home base, Sunderland club. But this alternative video shows how widely appreciated they are across different generations and movements in tango. It shows them dancing at Villa Malcolm, home of the Tango Nuevo practica Tangocool: Poema.
http://www.salsafriends.com/dance-c...-rosa-perez-carablanca-friday-29-october.html

There are other references to VU and Los Perez, this is just the first I found.
In many ways I don't disagree with their claim that VU didn't exist (it's just
their dance), but marketing here and in BsAs now says otherwise and also
because of wide teaching it has been established as a recognisable style.
 

dchester

Moderator
Staff member
I know why - here's a quote from Horacio Godoy on
VU......
", it's about the musicality and the quality of the movement. It's about a wealth of knowledge so subtle and complex that for the ordinary eye is imperceptible. "
True, and that quote is from an interview done in 1999, well before the marketing hype era of a couple years ago (at least according to some of the prior posts).

Here's another quote from that same article:
Naveira himself affirms: "a single person cannot be determining in the evolution of the dance. That's been happening from the beginning of the tango, and without stop, always because of a conjunction of factors."


http://www.neymelo.com/tangostyles.htm
 

opendoor

Well-Known Member
I know why - here's a quote from Horacio Godoy on VU......
"it's about the musicality and the quality of the movement. It's about a wealth of knowledge so subtle and complex that for the ordinary eye is imperceptible."
I like Horacio´s dancing, but I am really amazed that there actually is some VU inside.. And the unworthy ordinary eye rather is something to glorify than to explain!
 

dchester

Moderator
Staff member
In many ways I don't disagree with their claim that VU didn't exist (it's just their dance), but marketing here and in BsAs now says otherwise and also because of wide teaching it has been established
as a recognisable style.
I've talked to some Argentines who say the style should have been named after Carlos and Rosa (of course they agreed that the style exists). Some also say that the style existed long before anyone gave it a name. While others say that style was named after the region, and other neighborhoods had their own styles, like Almagro style (Susana Miller called it Milonguero style), but the ease of traveling blurred things, and now many of the regional styles have been consolidated.

Who knows what the truth is, but these are some of the things I have been told.
 

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