Blackpool 1962

#6
Took me few takes to figure out one of the clips was a Paso! :) Boy, has ballroom really evolved. I have to respect these old champions. Look at the way they danced before. I suppose they know how to reinvent themselves & pass that wisdom to the new generations!
 

Laura

New Member
#7
I must say, I really enjoyed watching these. The dancing seemed so much more natural and fun than what you see today. Yes, I admire the athleticism in today's dancing, but there is so much "bad over-acting" these days -- especially in the Latin -- that I often feel like I am watching bad soap operas played out on the dance floor.

One thing that really stood out to me was the difference in hold from then to now. I'm so used to today's, especially when it comes to Standard, that the older hold looks quite constricting.
 

tangotime

Well-Known Member
#9
laura

Actually , the hold, as i recall, was more comfortable, and more natural. The forward pitch of the man, fell more into line , with the way that one normally walks, it now, to my mind, has the opposite effect, by reducing a natural flow to something more artificial in the "swing " dances.Tango, is the one that has really changed, faster tempos and beginnning to look more like f/t in certain instances . Q/s, of course changed with the advent of 4/4/ time . As far as the latin goes, it tended to be very bouncy, and did not have a "true " feel about it, rhumba being an exception . On the other hand, the interpretation was matched with the music ( very pop type except for paso ) As you see walter there, his style began to change quite a lot over the yrs. he started to shape quite differently, and started to develop a more " rounder " look in his posture .He was, of course, one of the true "characters " in the biz.
 

pygmalion

Well-Known Member
#12
Oh my gosh!!! That is a paso, isn't it? :shock:

It'll be interesting to see where things evolve in another ... forty-something years. Wow. Things change. :?
 

tangotime

Well-Known Member
#13
Sal

The reason q/s changed , was the change in music . Most q/s/ were written in 2/4 time. Thus, when 4/4 ( the jazz influence ) became prominent, it ushered in the era of a term known as " Crackerjacks " q.s.danced with many syncopations . Wally Fryer, who won the British in 47, 48, and 49 was the first innovator of this "new " addition to the dance .He stood about 4feet nothing, and covered more space in the blink of an eye, than can be described.He is to q/s what scrivener is to tango . I feel fortunate to have attended his lectures, dems , and see him compete on numerous occasions .Hope that answers your q .
 
#14
Oh my gosh!!! That is a paso, isn't it? :shock:
Yup, that's why it took me a few takes as the costumes totally threw me off. I was like, what kind of standard dancing was that! Finally, I figured out it was Paso :) I think the costume evolution was most interesting. Back then they looked like ballerinas w/ tutus. Now, sexy, almost naked outfits!
 

tangotime

Well-Known Member
#15
swan

It sometimes seems its more about the " dress ? " than the dance !!. I could tell you how many of the judges , feel about that-- take a guess
 
#16
The reason q/s changed , was the change in music . Most q/s/ were written in 2/4 time. Thus, when 4/4 ( the jazz influence ) became prominent, it ushered in the era of a term known as " Crackerjacks " q.s.danced with many syncopations .
So the old quickstep would probably be the type of more march-like music that is called a quickstep, as might be performed by your town/company band... from that point two groups have taken the name forward in different directions. Today if you ask a dance person for a quickstep, they will point you at an uptempo swing, but if you ask a brass band person, what they will nominate might be closer to the original.
 

tangotime

Well-Known Member
#17
q.s

Chris-- not exactly -- If you , or any one else has access to pre 1945 Victor Sylvester recordings, it will give you more of a feel , than can be word expressed . It was still bright and punchy melodies , and was more of the type one would find played at the top end nite clubs, invariably with vocals to old standards .True, most people today, in the biz. , would identify much more of a jazz influenced arrangement , as q.s., and, in all fairness, most certainly suits the kind of material that is available at the higher levels of performance
 
#18
Someone related it to me once, ages ago, that the quickstep of today was "the foxtrot of then", and then along came the slow foxtrot... or something like that- I probably have it backwards... so I'll just "take the butcher's word for it'.
 

tangotime

Well-Known Member
#19
p.d.--qs origin

Its roots are the Q time foxtrot and the charleston, ( 46 bars p.m. ) danced as such in the 1927 " Star Champ. " danced by Frank Ford and Molly Spain. The name q.s. was adopted shortly after that . They also were the first to win in Waltz, which also had undergone major changes .p.s. forgot to add that 1 step was also influential
 

Joe

Well-Known Member
#20
Yup, that's why it took me a few takes as the costumes totally threw me off. I was like, what kind of standard dancing was that! Finally, I figured out it was Paso :)
The fact that they didn't stay in frame didn't clue you in? ;)
 

Dance Ads