BsAs syndrome

#83
Well I don't want to be a clone of anyone else, and I don't see any useful purpose in modelling my own dance by reference to anywhere else, BsAs included, as long as I fit in on the broad spectrum of what is considered normal/acceptable in the places where I dance.
You always need some sort of reference, even if you don't want to totally follow it. Otherwise, how can you know if the dance you have been taught is tango or some chinese dance disguised as tango?
I don't suffer from it. Plenty of people seem to take pleasure in trying to infect me, but I have been immunised. If the faux-Latinos don't all want to kiss me on both cheeks, every time we meet, then at least I don't have to share their garlic-breath. Life has its compensations.
Tango is not only a dance. It is a set of many form of art, including music, poetry, theatre, literature... but also traditions, customs, superstitions, and much more. Someone likes it all, someone is only interested to the dance. This shouldn't be an issue.

Moreover, there are a lot of traditions that are argentine but have nothing to do with tango. I like empanadas but I don't like mate. Is it a problem?
I am not telling that we shouldn't dance "Adios muchachos" (argentine never dance it: it is supposed to bring bad luck).
 

opendoor

Well-Known Member
#87
Yeta

..I am not telling that we shouldn't dance "Adios muchachos" (argentine never dance it: it is supposed to bring bad luck).
Once I was shocked that no one around in my hometown did take care of this habit:
http://www.dance-forums.com/showthread.php?t=27094 And you Zoopsia has scoldet me for leaving the people in such darkness. Do you still remember? Meanwhile the habits changed, and even in BsAs it is actually possible to dance Adios Muchachos if it is a cover version or instrumental.

..I like empanadas but I don't like mate. Is it a problem?
For males drinking mate can be dangerous if you fiddle about with the Bombilla deep in thought....

Only hope that spreading the finger while dancing isn´t connected with any kind of Yeta, too....
 

Zoopsia59

Well-Known Member
#89
Once I was shocked that no one around in my hometown did take care of this habit:
http://www.dance-forums.com/showthread.php?t=27094 And you Zoopsia has scoldet me for leaving the people in such darkness. Do you still remember?
Of course I don't remember... I barely remember yesterday!

And I can't remember something I never really picked up on, which is that apparently there are TWO of these forbidden songs that are not to be danced to. One more and we'll have an entire tanda that no one should dance to.

Oh wait.. we already do.. it's called the teacher demo!
 
#91
I think you mean Adios Nonino
I mentioned Adios Muchachos because it is perfectly danceable. If one is not interested to follow argentine superstitions, there is no reason to avoid it. Let's say it is like number 13 in North-America.

Adios Nonino is objectively difficult to dance, no matter what is was intended for.
 

bordertangoman

Well-Known Member
#92
I mentioned Adios Muchachos because it is perfectly danceable. If one is not interested to follow argentine superstitions, there is no reason to avoid it. Let's say it is like number 13 in North-America.

Adios Nonino is objectively difficult to dance, no matter what is was intended for.
"For example, one doesn't dance to the well known tango "Adios Muchachos" as it is (falsely)[citation needed] believed the last one sung by Carlos Gardel before his untimely accident leading to his death."

wiki
 

opendoor

Well-Known Member
#93
...it is (falsely)[citation needed] believed the last one sung by Carlos Gardel before his untimely accident leading to his death.

wiki
ah, Wiki lost touch with the tango afficionados. It is not danced for another reason. It was regarded a presentiment, as a farewell note in advance. The order of the last recorded pieces got no relevance. Adiós Muchachos was written in 1927, Gardel died in 1935.

Goodbye boys, fellows of my life,
Loved bar from those times.
It’s my turn, today, to commence the retreat
I have to move away from my good group of young people

Goodbye boys, i go now and i resign,
Nobody beats the destiny.
All the parties/ mockeries are over, for me,
My ill body doesn’t resist anymore.

In my mind come memories from other times,
Of the beautiful moments that i have long ago enjoyed,
Close to my mother, old saint,
And to my beloved one, whom i have so much idolatrised.

They remember that she was beautiful, prettier than a Goddess,
And what a full of verve love, did my heart gave her.
But, God, jealous of her charm,
Took her away, sinking me in cry.

God is the supreme judge, nobody resists in front of Him,
I am now accustomed, to respect His law,
Well, my life ended with His orders
Taking away my mother and my beloved one, also.

Two sincere tears cried at my depart
For the loved bar that never forgot me,
And giving to my friends, my last goodbye
I give them, my blessing, with all my heart.

Goodbye boys, fellows of my life,
Loved bar from those times.
It’s my turn, today, to commence the retreat
I have to move away from my good group of young people

Goodbye boys, i go now and i resign,
Nobody beats the destiny.
All the parties/ mockeries are over for me,
My ill body doesn’t resist anymore

If Mark Knopfler would die to morrow the same would happen to Brothers in Arms.
 

UKDancer

Well-Known Member
#94
I'm including it (Adiós Muchachos) in my next playlist. It'll be the first song in a Canaro/Maida tanda. Apart from anything else, if Roberto Maida is about to drop dead, he sounds remarkably cheerful about it.

The question is, who will be the predictable bore who ostentatiously sits it out, or even comes and tells me off? I'll offer him/her a couple of harmless Asprin, and say they are the cure for BsAs Syndrome.
 
#96
I'm including it (Adiós Muchachos) in my next playlist. It'll be the first song in a Canaro/Maida tanda. Apart from anything else, if Roberto Maida is about to drop dead, he sounds remarkably cheerful about it.

The question is, who will be the predictable bore who ostentatiously sits it out, or even comes and tells me off? I'll offer him/her a couple of harmless Asprin, and say they are the cure for BsAs Syndrome.
I grew up in a very superstitious culture. I am somewhat superstitious (not nearly as much as my grandparents' generation, though :) ). Personally, I don't believe teasing people about their superstitions is especially good taste.

However, you won't be the first to challenge that particular tango superstition:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bp1-amjSOro

Note that it was not done it in the traditional venue full of old people, quite the contrary. ;)
 

Steve Pastor

Moderator
Staff member
#97
I've never heard of this superstition.
If you get a chance, you might watch Robert Duvall's "Assasination Tango". I seem to remember that there is a scene where this superstition is the topic of discussion. As I remember it, even mentioning the song should involve a grasping of a certain part of the male anatomy to ward off the bad luck involved. (I have the dvd at home, and may review it.)

I should add, for those of you who aren't aware of it, that Duvall's wife is an Argentina, and he (Duvall) is very much into the tango, even dancing at the White House for some function or other..
 

opendoor

Well-Known Member
#99
Think a lot of forum readers already know that jantango has offered guidance in and for BsAs several times. http://jantango.wordpress.com

Recently also another friend wrote on her blog:

Are you coming to BA for the first time or for the first time in a while (the Buenos Aires tango scene can change quite rapidly)? Are you uncertain which would be the best milongas for you? How to find out where and when the good classes are? Are you wondering where you’d be most likely to get good dances? How to negotiate the codes of the formal milonga? How to break into the younger people’s informal but high-calibre scene? Nervous about cabeceo? I offer advice and help, at a flat hourly rate, so you can choose exactly how much help and assistance you may or may not need...
I’ve been living in Buenos Aires for nearly seven years and dancing there almost nightly, at a wide range of milongas. In addition to being a native speaker of English, I speak fluent Spanish, German and French. Please contact me via my Facebook account (Terpsichoral Tangoaddict) or through gmail (ttangoaddict@gmail.com).
 

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