Colgadas - are they for the milonga floor?

Peaches

Well-Known Member
#21
Really? Seriously?

Maybe you should do the DVIDA syllabus, they're covered there... :)

Ot of interest, do you know what volcadas look like?


Yeah, those are horrible weird spinny moves. Yuk.


You what?

It's clearly a demonstration of a step at the end of a class, not a showpiece. What does it matter what they're wearing? :confused:


You seem to have an expert opinion on this considering this is the first time you've seen one...


Are you really asking this question?
C'mon, Dave. You know the answers to your questions... No, they're not real questions. It's a flimsy basis for carping on a favorite topic and bashing others.

Question for others out there--what is the difference between a colgada and a single axis turn? Is it just the difference between the same move done in open versus done in close embrace? Cuz, really, I'm thinking about this and can't nail down a difference other than that.
 
#22
Question for others out there--what is the difference between a colgada and a single axis turn? Is it just the difference between the same move done in open versus done in close embrace? Cuz, really, I'm thinking about this and can't nail down a difference other than that.
It is a colgada, when I have to hang out (colgar) my rear end (hips in case of the sideway one), away from the common axis of the couple, in order for it to work. It is a single axis turn, when I don't.
I guess a singe axis turn can be considered as a teeny tiny colgada, and vice versa :)
 
#23
Question for others out there--what is the difference between a colgada and a single axis turn?
From my wonderful glossary: :)

Hanger (Spanish term: Colgada): A move in which both dancers lean out away from each other
So a colgada doesn't have to involve a turn.

But, obviously, a colgada implies a shared single axis. Otherwise you'd fall over :)

But as Stever said, you can imagine a single axis turn when leaning in - a volcada-style thing.
 

bordertangoman

Well-Known Member
#24
From my wonderful glossary: :)


So a colgada doesn't have to involve a turn.

But, obviously, a colgada implies a shared single axis. Otherwise you'd fall over :)

But as Stever said, you can imagine a single axis turn when leaning in - a volcada-style thing.
this reminds me of the Name of The Rose;

As Inquisitor I declare the colgada has to have a turn otherwise there is no axis of which to speak of. A colgada may be done in close embrace or open but not apilado Colgadas may arise from a step over or step behind- there are examples of these in the previuous videos. All are acts of heresy ;)
 

dchester

Moderator
Staff member
#26
this reminds me of the Name of The Rose;

As Inquisitor I declare the colgada has to have a turn otherwise there is no axis of which to speak of. A colgada may be done in close embrace or open but not apilado Colgadas may arise from a step over or step behind- there are examples of these in the previuous videos. All are acts of heresy ;)
My guess, is that the original colgadas had both the spin (on a single axis) and the lean aspects. Since then, people have experimented/expanded on both of these things, and not always with the other. Now, we have two categories of movements which both are sometimes called colgadas.
 

opendoor

Well-Known Member
#27
Re: colgadas

With other words:

-a single-axis-turn is a rotated colgada with low input in a close hold. But there are a lot of others (rotated, twisted, front, side, and back colgadas, each can be done on the left or right foot of the woman, a.s.o.....). Of course, they don´t work in close hold.


But anyway:

..was so surprised, that Saint Salas did them so ugly !?

And (attention please: I´m with Jan for the first time) My belief is, that the music rules the style. Indeed, the shown dancing does not fit to the music, at all.
 

Lui

Active Member
#29
When I encountered my first colgadas, like 1999, they were taught as novelty figures, where both partners share a common axes. This means each partner would drop without the other. The colgada was seen as the inversion of the volcada. Extending the embrace the colgada gave the couple a V shape , while the volcada gives an A shape, when both took a step backward maintaining the embrace. Those figures occupied quite some space and time, as they were mainly used as a pose in shows - e.g. dragging the tilted woman along the stage. For colgadas, look at a video of Tango Passion. You will find some some super fast ones. Those moves seem to be around for quite some time and they didn't use much turning. We were explicitly warned not to use them in a milonga, as they would hinder the dance flow. During the last years some people seem to experiment with integrating of those ideas into a continuous dance flow. Applying rotation seemed to work well. Look at the videos of Homer Ladas or Oscar Casas. They came up with some movements that will work at a tango salon setting. Are those boiled down moves still colgadas or just turns? I’m not sure. Are they the best choice to honor the music? I’m not sure, neither. Could they be danced really, really beautiful. Who knows.

Some examples:

Casas
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N1JTFN6x4Pg
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GvHdD7-qsaA

Ladas
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SdBp1MbPW20
 

dchester

Moderator
Staff member
#31
Hi Lui, think the ones lead out of the womans back ocho can be danced without much space. I often use them in Milongas, even if it is full around.
Is it done directly from the back ocho, or do you have the woman take one additional step before doing the spin? Either that or do you have a link to a video of it being done that way?

(I'm learning about new possibilities!!!)

 

jantango

Active Member
#32
Is it done directly from the back ocho, or do you have the woman take one additional step before doing the spin? Either that or do you have a link to a video of it being done that way?

(I'm learning about new possibilities!!!)

You should be discovering the possibilities on your own rather than copying others or paying for them. That's the freedom of the dance.
 

dchester

Moderator
Staff member
#34
You should be discovering the possibilities on your own rather than copying others or paying for them. That's the freedom of the dance.
Actually, I do some of both. And more often than not, when I learn a new step from someone else, I will modify it to suit my style. It does drive some teachers nuts though.

BTW, I'll give DNI credit. When I was in BsAs at one of their classes, working on a turn (and of course I changed it a bit), Pablo looked at it a couple times and said, "It's not exactly what we teach, but it's a very nice turn. For you, keep it."

 
#36
You should be discovering the possibilities on your own rather than copying others or paying for them. That's the freedom of the dance.
Except at a low level you need a good grounding in technique before you can create. Paying people to coach you in good technique is a good idea... most people need that. e.g. I take a big side step but I am finding it hard to travel through my centre well - result, I'm not quite on balance when I arrive - ergo my partner could've created something wonderful for us at that point but b/c I wasn't quite grounded he couldn't.
 
#38
Except at a low level you need a good grounding in technique before you can create. Paying people to coach you in good technique is a good idea... most people need that. e.g. I take a big side step but I am finding it hard to travel through my centre well - result, I'm not quite on balance when I arrive - ergo my partner could've created something wonderful for us at that point but b/c I wasn't quite grounded he couldn't.
Light Sleeper, ....very well put. However, based on you last sentence, you seemed to be forgeting the age old adage,..."it takes two to tango".
(it should have read..."we could've created something wonderful"...)

"You've got to learn your instrument. Then, you practice, practice, practice. And then, when you finally get up there on the bandstand, forget all that and just wail.”
-Charlie Parker-
 

Peaches

Well-Known Member
#40
I don't generally think of those as colgadas either, but I can see the similarity. Both partners have to be "in opposition" to each other for those to work well, IME. There is a feeling of being off your axis, away from your partner. That's very colgada-like.
 

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