Colgadas - are they for the milonga floor?

#42
There is a feeling of being off your axis, away from your partner. That's very colgada-like.
Hanging is very colgada-like. Not hanging is not very colgada-like.

Colgada is simply a Spanish descriptive term meaning suspended, hung etc. It is not some special dance word.
 

Peaches

Well-Known Member
#43
Hanging is very colgada-like. Not hanging is not very colgada-like.

Colgada is simply a Spanish descriptive term meaning suspended, hung etc. It is not some special dance word.
I never said that it was a special dance word. ??? :confused:

All I'm saying is that there is a crucial element in common. ...at least the way I have been taught colgadas, which is to say a movement in which one or both partners are taken off their axis away from one another (as opposed to volcadas, where one or both partners are taken off their axis towards each other). Given that this spin (or whatever you want to call it) requires that both partners "lean" away from each other, and there is an element of being off your axis, there is a functional similarity.

Can't say as I've ever thought of "hanging" when it comes to colgadas...
 
#45
Can't say as I've ever thought of "hanging" when it comes to colgadas...
"Works as designed", as they say in the (non-)teaching business. Just think of what might happen if instructors started explaining the real and simple meaning of the terms they use... their students might start thinking for themselves and then even dancing for themselves!! :)
 

dchester

Moderator
Staff member
#47
Colgada is simply a Spanish descriptive term meaning suspended, hung etc. It is not some special dance word.
That statement you made, is about as helpful as saying Giro is the Spanish word for turn. Most words used in tango have other meanings outside of tango.

You seem to be unaware that words can have more than one meaning (or usage). Most of the people on this forum are able to understand the correct meaning of the words used here, from the context of the conversation, but that doesn't appear to be one of your strengths.
 

opendoor

Well-Known Member
#48
Sorry, just read your last two comments (not the whole thread): There is no contradiction in that!

When I started to learn colgadas, I tried to make widly overhanging turns on a shared rotation centre. When I dance colgadas now, I try to enjoy a sublime switch in the tension between two bodies. Watching, no one would realize a colgada. Everything (exept walking perhaps ?) can be danced colgadized.
 
#49
That statement you made, is about as helpful as saying Giro is the Spanish word for turn.
Sorry to have to tell you - giro is just a Spanish word for turn.

Most words used in tango have other meanings outside of tango.
Spanish words to not change meaning as soon as one crosses the threshold of the milonga. To those for whom tango is part of life, there is no "inside" and "outside tango". No-one needs to invent a new set of meanings when there is already a wealth of words that work fine - except instructors whose objective is instead to obfuscate rather than enlighten. No-one even needs these meansing when they are free to learn through dance rather than instruction.

PS I guess many here know the joke name used for the language that has emerged in the tango dance classes of the third world through the propagated misunderstanding of Spanish words by those who have never heard them used for real - "Spango". Amusingly now I hear there are instructors who don't know it is a joke - a student told me recently of one who started a class, with "Today I am going to teach you some of the most important Spango terms" - completely seriously! :)
 

dchester

Moderator
Staff member
#50
Sorry to have to tell you - giro is just a Spanish word for turn.
I'm really hoping you were trying to be funny (and if not, the point of my post sailed over your head).

In any case, that made me laugh.

Spanish words to not change meaning as soon as one crosses the threshold of the milonga. To those for whom tango is part of life, there is no "inside" and "outside tango". No-one needs to invent a new set of meanings when there is already a wealth of words that work fine - except instructors whose objective is instead to obfuscate rather than enlighten. No-one even needs these meansing when they are free to learn through dance rather than instruction.
Whether you feel the need exists or not, words do evolve. Some words have a range of meanings, while some have more than one meaning. If you choose to ignore that fact, it will be difficult for you to really understand the essence of many conversations. Possibly that is why you spend so much more time than the rest of us either trying to "correct" our terminology, or arguing about semantics.
 

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