Connection -independent of skill level

#42
I like it to give that a try. But such efforts will often fail if a lady is generally unhappy in tango with her partner, gender or hierarchy situation. I do not judge with this whether such a perception is well-founded and reasonable or not.
Succeeding or not is not the issue, neither are the fellow class goers' problems. In class we are learning, training, and practicing our skills. If we learned something about ourselves, about dancing and about tango as a result-- it was a successful session.
 
#46
Leading in class is very different from a milonga.
How so? Perhaps you wouldn't try unfamiliar moves in a milonga and take the risks you do in a learning environment like practica and class...but other than that how is leading in a milonga so fundamentally different than. In class/practica?
 

twnkltoz

Well-Known Member
#47
How so? Perhaps you wouldn't try unfamiliar moves in a milonga and take the risks you do in a learning environment like practica and class...but other than that how is leading in a milonga so fundamentally different than. In class/practica?
Most notably, in class the follower knows what you're working on, so they're more likely to follow a substandard lead. At the milonga, you're much less predictable and therefore your lead has to be better. You have to hold it together for three songs, whereas in class it's probably only one or two and it's common and acceptable to stop and discuss, ask questions, try again, etc. The milonga is more crowded, with people around you moving less predictably. There's more pressure, as you're choreographing on the fly.
 
#48
To add to the points twinkletoz made:

In class we are there to learn. So it is OK for me to feel uncomfortable with some partners. It is OK to stop in the middle of the song to "figure it out" if something does not work, ask for instructor's help, etc. It is all part of the process.
In a milonga we are there to have a good time. I am dancing for my own and my partner's enjoyment. The latter is very important to me, and of course the partner cares a great deal about how I feel. We do not dance with random people. We pick who we like, and it is mutual.
Also, in a milonga there is a DJed music, and besides the already mentioned tandas, the selection and structure is different from the class. There are tangos, milongas, and valses. A class is usually dedicated to one rhythm.
At a milonga, unlike class, you may pace yourself, have breaks in the dancing, socialize, drink and consume food, choose the music you dance or not dance to. That affects your dancing as well.
 
#49
It probably still not so clear for someone who has never been in a milonga, but you will see: you dance very differently with someone you like (and want to dance with) a lot, to a music that inspires you, in a specifically set environment. Very seldom dancing in class comes any close to that feeling.
 

twnkltoz

Well-Known Member
#50
It probably still not so clear for someone who has never been in a milonga, but you will see: you dance very differently with someone you like (and want to dance with) a lot, to a music that inspires you, in a specifically set environment. Very seldom dancing in class comes any close to that feeling.
Very true! I'm glad you mentioned the positive aspects. Less clinical and more passionate. Less thinking, more feeling.
 
#52
In a milonga we are there to have a good time. I am dancing for my own and my partner's enjoyment. The latter is very important to me, and of course the partner cares a great deal about how I feel. We do not dance with random people. We pick who we like, and it is mutual.
Round here in a class one dances mostly with the enlisted partner, rotation gets done usually for a short period.
And as most attendees will never dance at milongas regularly, the class is somehow "their tango". Let's gently assume, that most of them are voluntary there, dance for their enjoyment and have a good time. ;)
The stress at milongas is quite more intense, so I would turn it around: if a leader is able to dance at milongas, he likely can easily adopt figures that get taught. And then he can concentrate on what's important: to dance well. A real asset for his follower in the class. :D
 
#53
Round here in a class one dances mostly with the enlisted partner, rotation gets done usually for a short period.
And as most attendees will never dance at milongas regularly, the class is somehow "their tango". Let's gently assume, that most of them are voluntary there, dance for their enjoyment and have a good time. ;)
The stress at milongas is quite more intense, so I would turn it around: if a leader is able to dance at milongas, he likely can easily adopt figures that get taught. And then he can concentrate on what's important: to dance well. A real asset for his follower in the class. :D
In this thread we discuss connection, and how it differs from partner to partner. So, what does dancing predominantly with an enlisted partner has to do with the topic of discussion?

Will being able to dance in milongas help a leader to be more comfortable with different partners in class?
It very possibly will. The point is, the topic starter has not yet been to milongas, and we encourage him to attend. ;)
 
#54
In other words, you are talking about people (who undoubtfully exist, enjoy themselves in their own way, and good for them!) who don't wish to get out of their comfort zone.
The topic starter already has, got interesting results, and we are discussing just that.
 

dchester

Moderator
Staff member
#55
How so? Perhaps you wouldn't try unfamiliar moves in a milonga and take the risks you do in a learning environment like practica and class...but other than that how is leading in a milonga so fundamentally different than. In class/practica?
It's different, precisely for the reason you articulated. In a class, you are likely focused on making sure you understand what it is you are trying to lead, what your steps are supposed to be, and how to make it all work. That shouldn't be the focus at a milonga. At a milonga, you are (supposed to be) leading things you are (at least) competent in. This enables you to then be more aware of / focus on things like her axis, the connection, music, floorcraft, leading well, etc. Basically, if you're thinking a lot about how to execute the steps, you'll be missing out on what makes tango special, IMO.

Classes, and Practica, are where you figure stuff out.
 
#57
Will being able to dance in milongas help a leader to be more comfortable with different partners in class?
It very possibly will. The point is, the topic starter has not yet been to milongas, and we encourage him to attend. ;)
There's no need to encourage him, he already assured to attend milongas, I'm awaiting his field report. ;)

Indeed the first half year my compensation for coping with milongas was to be subchallenged in the classes. At that time I had my best dances in the classes, in the comfort zone of course, being the greatest of the tiny. :confused:
The second half year my motivation was to move the comfort zone inside the milongas.
After that year I stopped visiting classes - a workshop now and then is sufficient for my demands.
 

sixela

Well-Known Member
#58
I've found that, for myself, one of the most significant factors in meshing/connection on an emotional level is that my partner and I hear the music the same way.
I grok what you're saying, but my best dances are when my partner and I also find complementary aspects in the music that, when we leave room for each other's interpretation and even respond to the others. Two voice polyphony, if you want, rather than just simple harmony.

But yeah, it's gotta at least be compatible.
 
#59
One thought: Sometimes a lady follows perfectly, but it seems like it takes a lot of work on my part. There are a couple of ladies in my area that I swear can read my mind, and things happen effortlessly. To an outside observer both dances might look the same.
I'm having a hard time reconciling the concept of someone being "very good technically" at Tango and yet being bad at connecting to a partner.

I'm going to have to assume that you mean it is only YOU that has trouble connecting to them and other leaders rave about them.

Or are you saying you think they are very good technically because of the way they look when dancing?

Before I can actually comment productively on this thread, I would need an idea of how you determined that these followers are very good technically or even what you mean by being good technically (as separate from partnering). What's the criteria you are using for evaluation?
 

sixela

Well-Known Member
#60
when the DJ mixes Campos with Castillo in his Tanturi tanda, which you'll miss when you're focused on executing steps.
Heresy! Get the pitchforks, or next he'll be mixing el Chato with Moreno in his Rodriguez tanda!

[I'd better not post my last playlist online.]
 

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