Deep thought...

Laura

New Member
#6
All I know is that I felt like trash as a dancer until I met my partner, who is a real treasure, and now I feel great about my dancing (most of the time) too.
 
#7
I think finding the right dance-partner is probably as difficult as finding a life-partner. So if you find one, one must do the most to keep him.
 

fascination

Site Moderator
Staff member
#9
i actually find the thought encouraging...that no one person's assessment of another has an absolute bearing on another person's potential....amzing what we can accomplish with faith in ourself and if possible, one other person's unconditional faith in us
 
#10
Throwaway Overshare said:
"We look for a partner with some experience. Which is to say, we'll end up with the person someone else gave up on"
What is that elusive quality that makes a fit? What do you treasure?
Obviously differs for each person, what was it in your case - anybody?

One lady I dance with is a more capable dancer than most yet she usually gets fewer dancers than another lady at the same table who, although a decent dancer, just isn't in the same category.
She bends my ear a lot about this.

In this case i think it could be emotional dependency, the former reeks of it and the second one doesn't.

Me, I look for someone who likes a challenge and is prepared to fight to improve. The wishy washy I try to avoid.

D-spot
 
#11
D-spot said:
What is that elusive quality that makes a fit? What do you treasure?
Obviously differs for each person, what was it in your case - anybody?
For me, it's the ease at which I get along with the person I'm dancing with. If the lead is somebody that I find I "click" with, then I'm going to enjoy dancing with him more than with somebody I don't. Figures and technique can be learned, so as long as there's a willingness on both sides to do that. The chemistry is something that can't be faked or learned though.
 
#13
D-spot said:
What is that elusive quality that makes a fit? What do you treasure?
Obviously differs for each person, what was it in your case - anybody?

One lady I dance with is a more capable dancer than most yet she usually gets fewer dancers than another lady at the same table who, although a decent dancer, just isn't in the same category.
She bends my ear a lot about this.

In this case i think it could be emotional dependency, the former reeks of it and the second one doesn't.

Me, I look for someone who likes a challenge and is prepared to fight to improve. The wishy washy I try to avoid.

D-spot
Usually the youngest and most attractive are the ones who are asked to dance the most, at socials. Dance ability is secondary.
 
#15
as i would never want to be someone's first serious relationship (at this point in in my life) i have no desire to be someone's first dance partner.
 

LXC

New Member
#16
alemana said:
as i would never want to be someone's first serious relationship (at this point in in my life) i have no desire to be someone's first dance partner.
Great point. Gosh there're so many similarities between dance and life partnerships; it' scary. I truly admire those who can manage both at the same time.
 
#17
saludas said:
Usually the youngest and most attractive are the ones who are asked to dance the most, at socials. Dance ability is secondary.
tsb will refer to some dancers as "spankies". These are those that will find a new, good-looking woman, dance with her, monopolize her time, trying to impress her with their comparitively good dance skills and take advantage of the woman's lack of knowledge of the scene. But these are a minority. I would say the primary motivation of a social scene is to have fun. The issue is not "youngest and most attractive" versus "dance ability". For the most part the issue is "will this person and I have a good time together" versus "will we not have a good time together". If you get a dance with skilled dancers then dance ability does become primary, in general.
 
#18
saludas said:
Usually the youngest and most attractive are the ones who are asked to dance the most, at socials. Dance ability is secondary.
Well those are the wrong sort of events to attend then. Good *ballroom dance* socials are much closer to being a meritocracy. Yes, some people sometimes get overlooked unfairly, and some get perhaps undeserved attention, but for the most part in the long run it's those who can do it, and those who are working on it, that end up in the middle of things.
 

mamboqueen

Well-Known Member
#19
tacad said:
tsb will refer to some dancers as "spankies". These are those that will find a new, good-looking woman, dance with her, monopolize her time, trying to impress her with their comparitively good dance skills and take advantage of the woman's lack of knowledge of the scene. But these are a minority. I would say the primary motivation of a social scene is to have fun. The issue is not "youngest and most attractive" versus "dance ability". For the most part the issue is "will this person and I have a good time together" versus "will we not have a good time together". If you get a dance with skilled dancers then dance ability does become primary, in general.

This is funny.

But, wouldn't the ones doing the spanking be the spankers, and the girls would be the spankies?
 

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