Do people confuse Country Western with Ballroom etc.?

kayak

Active Member
#61
... but don't most people start dancing wherever their friends recommend would be fun? Depending upon which part of the country you live in, that might be country because it is light hearted and fun and that is perfect.
 
#62
... but don't most people start dancing wherever their friends recommend would be fun? Depending upon which part of the country you live in, that might be country because it is light hearted and fun and that is perfect.
No. I had no idea what I was getting into. I didn't have friends in the dance world or knew anyone that even tried to dance. I mean I learned that you have to do research after I started dancing, and I should have done that first. But I went for location more than anything. Now I have to drive a bit, but it's not a big deal for me to do so. ;)
 
#63
... but don't most people start dancing wherever their friends recommend would be fun? Depending upon which part of the country you live in, that might be country because it is light hearted and fun and that is perfect.
True, however, I think it also depends what crowd you run into. I have seen some very serious/competitive dancers as well as light-hearted/care-free in ballroom, country, and even in latin.
 
#64
It seems that the names themselves, Country & Western and Ballroom, could be enough to mean they are different. :cool:
We see a few former country dancers at ballroom dances. Waltz, ChaCha, east and west coast swing are some of the dances that country shares with ballroom. Robert Royston and Loreen Baldovi won 2 country swing world championships and than won 3 or 4 regular swing world championships. The basic steps seem similiar but the styling and types of moves are a bit different. Robert has made country swing and regular swing videos.

Country waltz also seems to cover a much wider range of tempo. Some of their waltzes are as fast as Viennese Waltz.
 

kayak

Active Member
#65
Yea, I think great dancers are great dancers. Your friends switched competition venues and didn't miss a beat. The top cw dancers competing this past week could switch dance styles and still be awesome. It comes down to what motives their hearts.

I read the original thread to be some kind of confusion. As a beginner, it didn't matter which dance style I started with. As we each get better, we have an idea of what motivates us and where our dance opportunities are. You could start in ballroom and then decide country or swing looked fun or the other way around. It seems to me like there are more similiarities than differences; especially at the beginning stages.
 
#66
Yea, I think great dancers are great dancers. Your friends switched competition venues and didn't miss a beat. The top cw dancers competing this past week could switch dance styles and still be awesome. It comes down to what motives their hearts.

I read the original thread to be some kind of confusion. As a beginner, it didn't matter which dance style I started with. As we each get better, we have an idea of what motivates us and where our dance opportunities are. You could start in ballroom and then decide country or swing looked fun or the other way around. It seems to me like there are more similiarities than differences; especially at the beginning stages.
I agree with that except that there are very big differences between CW and International. So, you can't just switch like that without taking a few lessons in International. I wish that you could, because that means less money for me to spend on lessons and more money for competitions. But it just doesn't work that way it seems. ;)
 

fascination

Site Moderator
Staff member
#70
IMO international is a mixed bag...it is the hardest to do and have it feel good, but the easiest for the guy to drag you through if you are lost...granted, it will feel awful, BUT...you aren't goin' anywhere...my favorite style btw, and a bit of heaven when it is going well...swoon...other than steps and balance...not much similarity to country, but I definately ascribe --within reason-- to a good dancer being a good dancer, period....there are some fundamentals that, once focused upon, prevent one from looking bad no matter what one is dancing...just IMO...but step wise, there are all sorts of cross overs to country
 
#71
I agree with that except that there are very big differences between CW and International. So, you can't just switch like that without taking a few lessons in International. I wish that you could, because that means less money for me to spend on lessons and more money for competitions. But it just doesn't work that way it seems.
Our coach has described the similarities between ballroom and country as follows:
CW Waltz is basically the same as American Smooth Waltz

CW Cha Cha uses the same leg technique as Int. Latin

CW Night Club dances "slow" on the down beat, Ballroom NC has an up beat.

CW East Coast is faster than American Rythym, but uses the same steps. It's more like Int. Jive and you see a lot of the pros incorporate Jive steps.

CW Polka is Polka world wide.

CW Triple Two, Two Step, and West Coast have no cross over to ballroom, although I have seen some ballroom comps that have WC categories. The CW people usually win.

T57
 

tangotime

Well-Known Member
#72
Fasc.

Easier for the man etc. ?-- again, if your reference is towards standard, there is no amount of pulling ( g-- forbid or shoving ) that will ever create the desired effect ,that it demands , thru the execution of correct technique and a complete understanding of the rhythmical nuances, that are to be employed in all of the 4 dances.
Might create you some slack on the latin side, as there are more obvious comparisons , but even then ,only thru steps that have a very similar root .
Even dancers ( whom I have trained ) at pro amer,style smooth making the conversion to standard, had to re think their approach to a constant closed position .
With out overstating the obvious, good training in comparable divisions , with core foundation principles firmly in place , would be an asset in crossing over.
 

fascination

Site Moderator
Staff member
#73
no. not easier for the man at all...simply put, easier for an Am. follow to be jerked through a routine if the guy is really strong...infinately harder to do well was my point
 

kayak

Active Member
#74
The same rethinking goes when a good ballroomer takes up cw. They look kind of stiff for a while and get a little lost in all the open turns. No doubt, each type of dance takes a lot of work.
 

DancePoet

Well-Known Member
#75
A few lessons in International???

I'd say more then a few. International emphasizes technique along with a closed position. A few lessons won't be enough to make a strong transition.
 
#77
no. not easier for the man at all...simply put, easier for an Am. follow to be jerked through a routine if the guy is really strong...infinately harder to do well was my point
I agree with you about this. I can get through a dance pretty easily with my instructor. I have a lot of work to do, but if I mess up (even in frame) he will quickly find a way to correct me whereas in some other dances that I have danced to... you can't do that. I also agree about the other stuff you had said about International in your previous paragraphs. ;)
 
#78
This in in response to Samina's question about Country Western cha cha.
Cowboy Cha Cha, also known as Traveling Cha cha, is a pattern partner dance that is very specific to Country Western clubs. It is danced progressively in a promenade position. There are four different patterns, each of which is done twice. This, and other pattern partner dances such as Horse Shuffle and Schottische are pretty popular where I am. The men don't have to worry so much about leading. And the women can just do the steps and not worry so much about following.
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I do not compete in CW and I'm no expert by far, but I have been to several CW events and go to bars and clubs where the variety of country dances (although line dancing is not popular here) are danced. CW Cha-Cha is danced regularly (I believe CW is more popular by far than ballroom around here). But what you describe sounds nothing like what I've known as CW Cha-Cha. Especially the non-lead/follow... huh? I'll have to ask around about something called Travelling Cha-Cha and maybe I'll better understand what you mean.

There are some country western songs which are a Cha-Cha rhtym, but a polka will also work. So you will se both dances on the floor at once. Polka travels of course, but Polka is still lead follow. The CW Cha-Cha dancers will take the center of the floor, and the Polka dancers will dance around them.
 
#79
There are some country western songs which are a Cha-Cha rhtym, but a polka will also work. So you will se both dances on the floor at once. Polka travels of course, but Polka is still lead follow. The CW Cha-Cha dancers will take the center of the floor, and the Polka dancers will dance around them.
Hi and welcome! I forgot about this thread until you pulled it back up again lol. Most songs can be danced to different things. And you could even say that some CW songs can be done to Ballroom choreography if you want to go that way. You just have to learn the differences between the dances before you switch though, because the CW Cha Cha for instance is a bit different than Smooth and Standard Cha Cha. But the same idea can be applied if you want to learn the steps. ;)
 

Steve Pastor

Moderator
Staff member
#80
connectionjunkie: What part of the country do you dance in?
Here's a link to a description of Traveling Cha Cha http://www.arjjazedance.free-online.co.uk/Traveling%20Cha.htm
When I went to Far West Rodeo in San Antonio, I only saw one couple do Traveling Cha Cha. And it was a Saturday night. (Oh, the better dancers come in later. Oh, the better dancers come in earlier and leave by now. And I stood in line to get in when they opened the doors!)
I see that some teach the latin hip motion in "regular" CW cha cha. Ever see John Wayne move his hips like that?

Good Night Club Two step songs have a da da DA (qq S) in the percussion. It makes it easy to "find" the beat to do the slow on.

I always thought polka was polka, too, but one partner I had (who had danced in professional musicals) did a step step step hop, while I was doing a step step step, the third step being a slow. We ended up on the same foot all the time, but it took us a while to get on the same page.

CW East Coast Swing is as fast or as slow as the music, and you can pick a triple step triple step instead of the slow slow for the side steps depending on the music and your preference.
 

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