Do tango dancers like tango music itself?

#21
I definitely started my tango journey liking alternative music more. But the more I explored the movements of the dance the more I came to realize how tango music was built to go with those movements. Now dancing tango to tango music fires up all the little pleasure centers of my brain, something alternative just can't do as much any more.
So I think for most people, understanding the movements of tango is a prerequisite for understanding why tango music is so good to dance to. That's why there seems to be a correlation between how good a dancer is and how much they like traditional tango music. (Note: only a correlation. There are definitely great dancers who prefer dancing tango to blues, or beginner dancers who love tango music.)
I LOVE THIS! (There's only a like button?) I feel exactly the same way, except I didn't start with alternative, and have a little trouble playing alternative when I DJ, especially the alternative I hear around here. There are some blues songs that are exceptions. I find it disturbing that women often tell me they like alternative - but they don't have to lead to music that doesn't fit.
 

Angel HI

Well-Known Member
#22
The music was an aquired taste for me. I loved the movement before the music. I rarely listen to it when I'm not dancing except on the way to a dance to get in the mood.
Exactly the same for me. I find that persons wither like tango music or they hate it; there is no in-between or sometimes.
 

Angel HI

Well-Known Member
#23
I think for most people, understanding the movements of tango is a prerequisite for understanding why tango music is so good to dance to. That's why there seems to be a correlation between how good a dancer is and how much they like traditional tango music. (Note: only a correlation. There are definitely great dancers who prefer dancing tango to blues, or beginner dancers who love tango music.)
Just thought that this deserved reposting.
 
#24
I like the music but it did take some time to get to know it, then get used to it and then actually like it..!
Now I think music works exactly like the dance itself. In the beginning we probably saw a show or people dancing and we were so amazed of how it looked on the outside, that we were like: "I want to learn this dance!". When we start taking classes though we quickly realize that things are not the way the look... We then have two options either to give up - thinking this dance is not for us - or do give it some time, embrace the suck, get to really know Tango and then reach the point where we are passionate about how it feels on the inside and not anymore about how it looks on the outside..!
So I think this is how it goes with music too...In the beginning we like the music that sounds more energetic, with more beat, more up-to-date speaks to us more...but if we spend the time getting to know the traditional music, we end up being passionate about how it feels on the inside - when we are dancing or not.
 
C

C&c2

Guest
#25
In the beginning we like the music that sounds more energetic, with more beat, more up-to-date speaks to us more...but if we spend the time getting to know the traditional music, we end up being passionate about how it feels on the inside - when we are dancing or not.
I appreciate the sentiment of most of your post. I really do. I, disagree, however with the idea that, given time, one will necessarily come to love traditional music. Sometimes, you just like what you like regardless of exposure. Such is the nature of subjectivity and aesthetics. I cringe when I read posts on here that assert that when your tango and musical sensitivities have been properly refined, you'll start to like REAL (read: Golden Age) tango music. It just reeks of special snowflake BS. Like what you like and keep it moving. Literally. :)
 
#28
I came to tango having danced Lindy Hop & Balboa for years (& years). I knew that dancing Lindy to swing era music, music that actually swings, feels MUCH better than dancing to neo-swing, which is basically rock & roll with horns - very square and choppy. Classic swing music flows and has a smoothness that feeds the dance in a way that rock / neo-swing does not. I assumed that tango would work the same way, and so spent a bit of time listening to golden age music prior to investing a big chunk of my life in learning tango. The fact that I liked golden age music is what ultimately persuaded me to take up the dance.

Although I do dance "tango" to all sorts of non-tango music, I like dancing to golden age music the best, and, with no disrespect to C&C, find that the rhythms, not just the obvious beat, but the more subtile structures within the music, feed my dance. This despite the fact that my preferred style is _not_ "milonguero".
 

opendoor

Well-Known Member
#30
...I'm wondering.. is it just a means to dance in the appropriate ambiance?
Hi Pietro, I find it problematic to speak of tango music at all. Is there a common concept for tango music around?

I like dancing to Guerrico/Salamanca as well as to Bustos/d'Arienzo But honestly, these pieces actually haven't got much in common. The differences within the tango family very often are greater than differences compared to other styles or genres.

So, I like this or that tango, but also hate others.

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By the way, hallo again, my DF friends.
Andreas from Hamburg, Germany
 

dchester

Moderator
Staff member
#31
Hi Pietro, I find it problematic to speak of tango music at all. Is there a common concept for tango music around?

I like dancing to Guerrico/Salamanca as well as to Bustos/d'Arienzo But honestly, these pieces actually haven't got much in common. The differences within the tango family very often are greater than differences compared to other styles or genres.

So, I like this or that tango, but also hate others.

-----------

By the way, hallo again, my DF friends.
Andreas from Hamburg, Germany
Same here. A coincidence, I played a Salamanca tanda this past weekend.

FWIW, there are some pretty big differences in Rock music too.

BTW, Nice to see you're back!!!
 
#32
I appreciate the sentiment of most of your post. I really do. I, disagree, however with the idea that, given time, one will necessarily come to love traditional music. Sometimes, you just like what you like regardless of exposure. Such is the nature of subjectivity and aesthetics. I cringe when I read posts on here that assert that when your tango and musical sensitivities have been properly refined, you'll start to like REAL (read: Golden Age) tango music. It just reeks of special snowflake BS. Like what you like and keep it moving. Literally. :)
It is true... it is possible that in the end someone might not like the traditional Tango music...haha...Does that mean they should stop dancing? Does it mean they are not meant for Tango? NOOO of course not!
And you are right, it is a pity when people get discouraged because of that..!
So I think, what I was trying to say is, that it is possible and maybe common, that after an extensive research someone can find one style of traditional music that he/she likes or prefers, so they shouldn't give it up right away or get discouraged without getting to know it first. There are so many different orchestras, different styles, different eras in Tango that something might be a really good fit...And then, this is a win-win situation, you get to know more music in general, you might find something you really like, and even if you don't, you will know the history of the dance through the music..! :)
 

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