Exercise

suburbaknght

Well-Known Member
#1
So I've been looking to vary my exercise routine lately and was wondering what suggestions people had for workouts that will specifically help your dancing or at least improve your body for dancing.
 

mamboqueen

Well-Known Member
#3
So many different kinds of exercise helps. Pilates is great for your core. Weights for your legs and arms give you strength. Cardio = endurance. I'd say just mix it up. Oh, and I had a personal training session where I was told to use a nylon ladder (laid out on the floor) to run through, lifting my legs as high as possible. I will say that it is probably similar to using a jump rope, but you have to use a bit more coordination to get each foot into each square -- so I think it helps with agility. He also had me take a 6 lb. medicine ball, and standing perpendicular to a wall, turn at the waist and throw it against the wall and catch it...repeatedly. Good for the waist...and perhaps turns? Don't know yet...but it's all working.
 
#4
Cardio = endurance. .
There are at least two kinds of endurance involved in dancing. Cardiovascular and muscular. They don't always go hand in hand beacuse cardiovascular endurande seems to be a systemic quality while muscular endurance can be localized. At least in my experience this seems to be the case
 

danceronice

Well-Known Member
#5
Anyone have any suggestions for some LOW-IMPACT cardio? I've just relearned why I stopped use the jump rope (it hurts my knee and ankle. A lot.) I do the stationary bike thing, but I'm looking for something a little more full-body but that doesn't require running or jumping (which pound too much on the knee--I broke my right knee when I was fourteen and it's never been quite the same. Lucky I'm one of the 30% or so of skaters who's a "leftie".) Swimming's not really an option as there's no pool around here, it's winter, and I can't afford to join a health club.
 

danceronice

Well-Known Member
#9
My poor skis are rotting in their bag. It's not easy to find trails in the Boston 'burbs! (If anyone knows a park that's good in the winter, please, let me know.)
 

fascination

Site Moderator
Staff member
#10
Anyone have any suggestions for some LOW-IMPACT cardio? I've just relearned why I stopped use the jump rope (it hurts my knee and ankle. A lot.) I do the stationary bike thing, but I'm looking for something a little more full-body but that doesn't require running or jumping (which pound too much on the knee--I broke my right knee when I was fourteen and it's never been quite the same. Lucky I'm one of the 30% or so of skaters who's a "leftie".) Swimming's not really an option as there's no pool around here, it's winter, and I can't afford to join a health club.
kickboxing, high-low, and floorworks, also spinning
 

mamboqueen

Well-Known Member
#11
Kickboxing killed my knee (I was probably not doing it correctly). Have you ever seen a "treadclimber", DOI? Low impact, but a good workout. Combo between the obvious...stair climber and treadmill.
 

Ithink

Active Member
#13
The elliptical is a great low impact cardio machine. I use it all the time and, barring not setting it too high enough resistance or going fast enough, it'll make you sweat!!!
 

fascination

Site Moderator
Staff member
#14
Kickboxing killed my knee (I was probably not doing it correctly). Have you ever seen a "treadclimber", DOI? Low impact, but a good workout. Combo between the obvious...stair climber and treadmill.
kick will tear your knee up laterally if you have shoes with too much grip and don't turn your knee when you turn your body...true
 

meow

New Member
#16
True, dancing as much as possible is better than gym work IMO. My kitten was told all through school how 'unfit' he was by the PE teachers due to his not wanting to participate in certain sports.
His not wanting to participate was to avoid any injury that would impact on his dancing - the teachers couldn't understand that. Did you know that in a comp (latin) that each dance is the equivalent of an 800 metre sprint? Do 5 dances in a row ( so 5 x 800 metre sprints), perhaps a few rounds a day til finals at night, never mind all your lessons and practice each week and then get told you must be 'unfit.'
I am sure that my kitten had a better cardiovascular system and muscle tone than any of those teachers.
 

meow

New Member
#18
Even the Rumba? How exactly do you measure equivalence?
It isn't always the case of speed. Actually, the rumba is very difficult to do correctly at a very high level, so the strength required, changes in musicality, tricks, spins with dead stops etc., all play a part. It is the cardiovascular rate and muscle use which has been used to calibrate.:)
 

danceronice

Well-Known Member
#19
well...rollerskates have 4 wheels so they are easier than in-lines. ;)
LOL, that's "quads". Four wheels, one on each corner. In-lines weird me out as they're like but unlike figure skates. (Wish I could do *that* more often, as it was great exercise, but right now I'm trying to stick to ice time where THEY'RE paying ME.) I need to get a nice cheap pair, though--no fancy boots. Of course the bootmaker who does most of the roller is Riedell and I can't wear them anyway--their stock boots are wicked narrow. Maybe if my old Jacksons don't sell for someone's pond skates I can have wheels put on--at least I'd know they were comfortable and broken in!

I have a friend who swears by an elipitcal (though as gym memberships and equipment purchases are out, it wouldn't be an option) but then again last week Former Pro asked the group class to excuse him if he went easy on himself during the lesson as he'd hurt his hip on...an eliptical trainer.
 
#20
It isn't always the case of speed. Actually, the rumba is very difficult to do correctly at a very high level, so the strength required, changes in musicality, tricks, spins with dead stops etc., all play a part. It is the cardiovascular rate and muscle use which has been used to calibrate.:)

Sounds interesting. Please provide a reference. Who conducted the studies?
 

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