Fun Facts and Trivia Thread !!!

bordertangoman

Well-Known Member
more on the giraffe ; its circulatory system; he giraffe has the largest heart of any land animal
The circulatory system of the giraffe has several adaptations for its great height. A giraffe's heart, which can weigh up to 10 kg (22 lb) and measure about 60 centimeters (2.0 ft) long, must generate approximately double the blood pressure required for an average large mammal to maintain blood flow to the brain. In the upper neck, a complex pressure-regulation system called the rete mirabile prevents excess blood flow to the brain when the giraffe lowers its head to drink. The jugular veins also contain several (most commonly seven) valves to prevent blood flowing back into the head from the inferior vena cava and right atrium while the head is lowered. Conversely, the blood vessels in the lower legs are under great pressure (because of the weight of fluid pressing down on them). In other animals such pressure would force the blood out through the capillary walls; giraffes, however, have a very tight sheath of thick skin over their lower limbs, which maintains high extravascular pressure in the same way as a pilot's g-suit.
 
more on the giraffe ; its circulatory system; he giraffe has the largest heart of any land animal
The circulatory system of the giraffe has several adaptations for its great height. A giraffe's heart, which can weigh up to 10 kg (22 lb) and measure about 60 centimeters (2.0 ft) long, must generate approximately double the blood pressure required for an average large mammal to maintain blood flow to the brain. In the upper neck, a complex pressure-regulation system called the rete mirabile prevents excess blood flow to the brain when the giraffe lowers its head to drink. The jugular veins also contain several (most commonly seven) valves to prevent blood flowing back into the head from the inferior vena cava and right atrium while the head is lowered. Conversely, the blood vessels in the lower legs are under great pressure (because of the weight of fluid pressing down on them). In other animals such pressure would force the blood out through the capillary walls; giraffes, however, have a very tight sheath of thick skin over their lower limbs, which maintains high extravascular pressure in the same way as a pilot's g-suit.
Nice, very nice, BTM! :cheers: and :notworth:
 
Question: By what name do we identify those certain kinds of weasels whose coats change color in the winter?

.
.
.
.
.
.
.

Answer: Ermine...


From triviacafe dot com...
 
Question: Which well-known capital city in Europe has the distinction of being the only one not located on a river?

.
.
.
.
.

Answer: Madrid


From triviacafe to com... :spam:
 
Question: Someone, in June of 1988, earned $22 million for 91 seconds of work. What's his name, and how did he earn this money?

.
.
.
.
.

Mike Tyson, by knocking out Michael Spinks...


From triviacafe dot com...
 
Question: What physical trait did all these people have in common: King Henry VIII, William Shakespeare, Winston Churchill, and Lucille Ball?

.
.
.
.
.

Answer: All redheads! Without Lucy in the list, it would have been even tougher... :)


From triviacafe dot com...
 
Question: Who was the movie voice of E.T?

.
.
.
.
.

Answer: Debra Winger -- Richard Gere's co-star in An Officer and a Gentleman...


From triviacafe dot com...
 
For which two movies did Hilary Swank win the Best Actress Oscar?
For which two movies did Tom Hanks win the Best Actor Oscar?

.
.
.
.
.

For Hilary Swank:
Million Dollar Baby (2004)
Boys Don't Cry (1999)

For Tom Hanks:
Forrest Gump (1995)
Philadelphia (1994)
 
Australia Fun Facts!

Apparently the first European settlers in Australia drank more alcohol per person than any other community in the history of mankind.

Australian mines (one of our most important industries, which accounts for 15% of Australia's GDP) cover 0.02% of Australia's land mass. More land is occupied by pubs.

In 1954 Bob Hawke made it into the Guinness Record Book: he sculled 2.5 pints of beer in 11 seconds. Bob Hawke went on to become the Prime Minister of Australia.

Australia has the world's largest population of wild camels with one hump.

The Tasmanian Devil does exist, and it has the jaw strength of a crocodile.

There are more than 150 million sheep in Australia, and only some 20 million people.

No part of Australia is more than 1000 km from the ocean and a beach. (The point in the world that's the furthest from any ocean would be in China.)

Australia has the world's largest cattle station (ranch). At 30,028 km2 it is almost the same size as Belgium.

Population density in Australia is usually calculated in km2 per person, not people per km2.

Australians have 380,000 m2 per person available. Yet well over 90% are cramming into the coastal cities (rather than the Outback).

They call Australian's from Queensland "banana benders", and people from Western Australia "sandgropers".

Tasmania has the cleanest air in the world.

The Great Barrier Reef has a mailbox. You can ferry out there and send a postcard, stamped with the only Great Barrier Reef stamp.

The Australian Alps, or Snowy Mountains as they are also known, receive more snow than Switzerland.

Melbourne has the second largest Greek population in the world, after Athens.
 
Coca-Cola was originally green.

A Saudi Arabian woman can get a divorce if her husband doesn't give her coffee.

About 10% of the world's population is left-handed.

The longest recorded flight of a chicken is thirteen seconds.

Montpelier, Vermont is the only U.S. state capital without a McDonald's.
 

bordertangoman

Well-Known Member
Question: What physical trait did all these people have in common: King Henry VIII, William Shakespeare, Winston Churchill, and Lucille Ball?

.
.
.
.
.

Answer: All redheads! Without Lucy in the list, it would have been even tougher... :)


From triviacafe dot com...
how on earth do you know Shakespeare was a redhead.. people are still arguing about who he was?
 

bordertangoman

Well-Known Member
A researcher has come up with some simple math that sucks the life out of the vampire myth, proving that these highly popular creatures can't exist.

University of Central Florida physics professor Costas Efthimiou's work debunks pseudoscientific ideas, such as vampires and zombies, in an attempt to enhance public literacy. Not only does the public believe in such topics, but the percentages are at dangerously high level, Efthimiou told LiveScience.

Legend has it that vampires feed on human blood and once bitten a person turns into a vampire and starts feasting on the blood of others.

Efthimiou's debunking logic: On Jan 1, 1600, the human population was 536,870,911. If the first vampire came into existence that day and bit one person a month, there would have been two vampires by Feb. 1, 1600. A month later there would have been four, and so on. In just two-and-a-half years the original human population would all have become vampires with nobody left to feed on.
 

Dance Ads