Heel or ball ?

opendoor

Well-Known Member
#1
Hi again !

Watch, Detlef seems to use his toes extensivly.
But, how do you walk, stepping with the ball or rolling down the heel?

 
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Ampster

Active Member
#3
Toe first, then land the heel.

The toe is to place/position yourself. Landing the heel allows your partner to feel your weight change, making following easier for her.

in AT, the effect of landing the heel first (IMHE), is that your leg lands before your upper body is ready to initiate the lead. Thus, making the lead muddled and confusing for the follow.
 
#5
Toe first, then land the heel.

The toe is to place/position yourself. Landing the heel allows your partner to feel your weight change, making following easier for her.

in AT, the effect of landing the heel first (IMHE), is that your leg lands before your upper body is ready to initiate the lead. Thus, making the lead muddled and confusing for the follow.
Hate to differ with you but placing the toe or heel first doesn’t constitute weight change. She feels the weight change when it’s transferred onto the leading leg.

in AT, the effect of landing the heel first (IMHE), is that your leg lands before your upper body is ready to initiate the lead. Thus, making the lead muddled and confusing for the follow.

Watch a camel walk and watch a leopard. That’s the difference between a heel and toe lead.

Some leaders want to dance smooth like a cat…toe lead…others don’t.
The heel lead seems to be the most popular way that tango is taught.
That’s okay to each his own.
 

Peaches

Well-Known Member
#6
I walk heel/roll through ball. Mostly because I've always had it drilled into my head to walk naturally. And I think it looks prettier.

...and I don't know how I'd walk toe-first in heels.

I do, however, use a toe-first action now and again, but it's sporadic and deliberate.

I tend to prefer when guys mostly step with their heels. From a visual standpoint, I think it tends to look cleaner and less like shuffling. From a feel standpoint, I think the changes of weight tend to feel more distinct, and it feels less like shuffling.
 

Peaches

Well-Known Member
#7
Ok, so having watched the video after my post I'll concede that that's an example of some beautiful walking. I still think I'd prefer the look of heel first, but he does what he does so nicely. Proof positive that it can be done without shuffling...now if only more people would figure that out.
 
#9
But neither camels, nor leopards have heels! :bouncy:
You missed my point. Camel’s bounce when they walk cats are soft footed and stalk very smoothly.
Orlando Paiva the master of this elegant lead named his signature move” Salida de Gato” translation “Cat’s Exit”
In tango you either walk like a cat or take heel leads.
 
#10
Ok, so having watched the video after my post I'll concede that that's an example of some beautiful walking. I still think I'd prefer the look of heel first, but he does what he does so nicely. Proof positive that it can be done without shuffling...now if only more people would figure that out.
The same thing holds true for heel leads. Some leaders can dance pretty smooth with heel leads while most tend to jump into the step creating a bounce.

This is Pablo Rodriquez I have never seen him dance before but someone on this thread commented about his heel lead. Notice the bouncing and the flailing legs.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ClugH5aEvUM
 

Ampster

Active Member
#11
Watch a camel walk and watch a leopard. That’s the difference between a heel and toe lead.

Some leaders want to dance smooth like a cat…toe lead…others don’t.
The heel lead seems to be the most popular way that tango is taught.
That’s okay to each his own.
Originally Posted by Ampster
But neither camels, nor leopards have heels!
You missed my point. Camel’s bounce when they walk cats are soft footed and stalk very smoothly.
Orlando Paiva the master of this elegant lead named his signature move” Salida de Gato” translation “Cat’s Exit”
In tango you either walk like a cat or take heel leads.
Nope, totally got you the first time. I just put that there to be facetious knowing exactly how you'd react the way you did. :)
 
#14
Personally I don't think it matters how you land the leading foot, as it is basically a free leg (and foot) until you are ready to initiate the weight transfer.

I think a lot depends on your personal prefernces and the effect that you want to convey to your follower.

Some people feel more stable with the toe leading some with the heel leading. I think whatever hits the floor first the intention of the movement is throught the heel though.

Where you are comfortable with either method then the music may dicatate how you may land the foot.

For instanceand using the animal analogies, I think a soft toe lends itself well to a cat like walk, whereas a hard heel and then letting the foot drop may lend itself to a duck type of feel. You do what the music tells you.

I think that you must definately be on the beat if you land on your heel, I think a toe landing is slightly more forgiving if you don't land correctly with the beat.

I was wondering though how people initiated the weight transfer once the foot has landed. It has been suggested to me that you should do this with a flat foot foot moving from the hip or rolling the foot or rolling the foot using your big toe as the lever. Personally I find I am more stable using the big toe as a lever.
 

Mladenac

Well-Known Member
#15
The same thing holds true for heel leads. Some leaders can dance pretty smooth with heel leads while most tend to jump into the step creating a bounce.

This is Pablo Rodriquez I have never seen him dance before but someone on this thread commented about his heel lead. Notice the bouncing and the flailing legs.

here is pablo walking :D

giros:
http://web.archive.org/web/20080610042945/http://www.northerntangosociety.com/video-6.html

How do you perform giros (moulinettes) in close embrace ?

about pablo rodriguez:

PABLO RODRIGUEZ

Pablo is a prodigious talent in the world of professional dance. We are proud to have worked with him so early in his career, for here is truly a star of the future. At just 23 years of age he has already won the prestigious title “Buenos Aires Metropolitan Salon Champion” with his partner Noelia Hurtado.

With a fluid and laid-back approach, Pablo’s casual informality belies the rigorous technical discipline underpinning his dance. The style is true to the classical Todaro tradition, and Pablo and Noelia are influenced by the elegance and lightness of touch evident in the Salon Tango of Villa Urquiza; the area of Buenos Aires in which Pablo has spent most of his time training with the old-style milonguero Carlos Perez. Carlos is a “face” from the 1950’s, yet our society’s members who have visited Buenos Aires will be delighted to find that he still teaches a class with his partner Rosita at the famous Sunderland Club every Monday night – and in the summer time you will probably find Pablo there too.
Pablo is passionate about expressing through his dance the deep and varied cultural background of the different musical styles existing in Argentina. Pablo says that if we dance in the same way to Di Sarli as we do to Pugliese or Canaro we have missed the point and need to listen again! He shows teaching and dancing ability far beyond his years and remains one of our most popular visitors.


It's odd you have heard about him.
 
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