heels for tango dancing

Zoopsia59

Well-Known Member
#21
That man clearly isn't to be danced with (not only does he lack a shirt, he also misses the obligatory Tango Look of Existential Ernst).

Despite her smile, that poor hapless follower doesn't know what's good for her.
hahaha! Yes any follower who doesn't know that smiling leaders are to be avoided should go back to basics class! ;)
 

dchester

Moderator
Staff member
#23
Exactly. In British English, a (long-sleeved) shirt always has a collar (the jury's stil out on Nehru collars), sleeves with cuffs and a vertical opening with buttons; in the US, it's sometimes called a "dress shirt".

Anything less "simply won't do". Women who like "men in shirts" obviously also object to the short-sleeved shirt.
Here (in the US), we have (in order of dressiness):
  • Shirt (anything called a shirt, a T-shirt would qualify)
  • Collared shirt (a golf shirt would qualify)
  • Dress shirt (a shirt that would be appropriate to wear with a tie (not that one has to wear a tie, though)).
Golf shirts are what I typically wear to milongas, and polo shirts are what I typically wear to practicas. In the summer at some milongas, you might even see someone wearing a T-shirt with shorts.
 

Zoopsia59

Well-Known Member
#24
Golf shirts are what I typically wear to milongas, and polo shirts are what I typically wear to practicas. In the summer at some milongas, you might even see someone wearing a T-shirt with shorts.
I'm a little fuzzy on the difference between a polo shirt and a golf shirt. I don't want to dance with the wrong guys. Golf shirts are vented in the back and polo shirts have little horses on them, right?
 

sixela

Well-Known Member
#25
"I don't want to dance with the wrong guys."

I'm definitely one of those, but an ocean of separation protects you (most of the time).
 

sixela

Well-Known Member
#27
I shall have to give you my Biagi look (yup, most definitely wrong, even though Sin Palabras is more angry and rebellious than it is tragic):



[(c) Jean Pierre Van Loocke]
 
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#28
Hi
Im 5'9 weigh 130 looking for advise on tango foot ware. Currently dance in 1.5 inch heels. Do I need to learn to dance in tango heels (the skinny kind over 2 inches) I'm tall as you know.
My partner dances in 2 or 2 1/2" Capezio Ballroom heels. She loves them because they are very flexible and conform to her foot rather than compelling her foot to conform to them. She is also an excellent dancer, and I have NEVER seen or heard of anyone not wanting to dance with her because she isn't wearing the latest 4" Comme Il Faut, or whatever, heels.
 
#29
One of the main factors while choosing tango shoes is comfort. Heels doesn't matter if your not comfortable with your shoes. And In case if you have good height, then definitely heels doesn't required
 
#31
I agree with many who said here - comfort is the most important aspect of the dance shoes. And comfort means different things to different people. I personally find dancing in flats or low heels very challenging. The higher the heel the easier it is on the foot, even if that sounds counter-intuitive. However, I know plenty of ladies that find high heels challenging.
However, there are other factors defining the comfort as well - I tried Comme Il Faut, Mr. Tango, Madame Pivot, Buein shoes. None felt quite right, and it was not the heel height which I tried several as well. Then I found Regina tango shoes and immediately I knew - this is my tango shoe brand. They fit me like they were custom made for me - 10 cm heels feel like bedroom slippers. So there are many factors that decide for each specific person - what is the right shoe that make your feet happy :)
 

Zoopsia59

Well-Known Member
#32
I agree with many who said here - comfort is the most important aspect of the dance shoes. And comfort means different things to different people. I personally find dancing in flats or low heels very challenging. The higher the heel the easier it is on the foot, even if that sounds counter-intuitive. However, I know plenty of ladies that find high heels challenging.
However, there are other factors defining the comfort as well - I tried Comme Il Faut, Mr. Tango, Madame Pivot, Buein shoes. None felt quite right, and it was not the heel height which I tried several as well. Then I found Regina tango shoes and immediately I knew - this is my tango shoe brand. They fit me like they were custom made for me - 10 cm heels feel like bedroom slippers. So there are many factors that decide for each specific person - what is the right shoe that make your feet happy :)
I also discovered (the hard and expensive way) that heel height isn't the only structural consideration for how the shoe feels to dance in. I have a pair of Artesenals with 3.75" heels that feel far more stable to me than some of my 3" heels. Just how the footbed angles and arches plays a part. Consistent slope? Increased slope towards the metatarsal? Flatter at the heel or still angled? etc. Typically, anything over 3" starts to be a challenge for me, but this one pair of higher heels feels pretty good.

Another factor that people rarely discuss is the curvature of the "last". I posted a link about this on another thread, but I've no idea which one now or where I got the link. From heel to toe, shoes have a certain amount of curve. Some lasts are fairly straight and others are noticeably curved. (meaning, if you put a tape at the center of the back of the footbed and ran it towards the toes parallel to the outside of the shoe, it will finish somewhere between the center of the toe area (straight last) & towards the pinky toe (curved last). I find that I dance better in a straight-lasted shoe than a curved last. My Artesenals and Madraselvas are fairly straight compared to my Nueva Epocas. CIF is somewhere in between.
 
#33
For me there surely a difference between Tango trainers and my social tango shoes and then the shoes I have for performances.
But firstly, I love shoes so I buy them!haha
Secondly after a lot of work of I dance with whatever type of shoe on. But really high heels require extra work. So it is better to build your way up if stiletos and/or high heels are the type of shoes that you like. I have seen many ladies just buy the shoes because they look nice, or because their teachers told them to and then they don't feel comfortable wearing them..!
Lastly, I think it really has to do with what you want. I mean if at some point you want to compeet for example you need to start working with different types of shoes. But if for example you are interested in the social aspect of the dance then you just do what pleases you!
Sometimes places, might require a more formal dress code, so if the shoes you are referring to are trainers then I would suggest you get a pair of low heel Tango shoes.
Hope this helps!
 

Angel HI

Well-Known Member
#34
Do I need to learn to dance in tango heels.
Firstly, Welcome to the DF. Secondly, Zoops and Mlad have given you great advice re heels. I am a wee surprised that no one mentioned that the simplicity of it is... so many ladies do not even walk well in heels. If you walk well (proper foot usage, and graceful straightening of the legs, etc), in your current heels, then dance in them. If you do not move and balance well in higher heel, don't change for the sake of the dance... there is no need.
 
#35
I absolutely agree with Angel Hl - if you don't wear heels often and not comfortable walking in them in your every day life, it will be a steeper learning curve - to add heels training to your dance learning. And probably not worth the effort. Sure, tango shoes can look spectacular sitting in those display cases. But if you are not used to wearing them they will not look good on your feet. Pretty feet - well placed and balanced - make any shoes, heels or no heels - look good, not vice versa.
 

Mladenac

Well-Known Member
#36
I must admit that tango spoiled me. And a lot of women leart walking in high heels only because of tango.

So if I notice bad walking in high heels, I lose my perception of feminity in a woman.
 

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