HELP no can do at close embrace

Steve Pastor

Moderator
Staff member
Another aspect to this, which I found interesting is that one of the authors of one of the above books reported that a musicologist who had worked with African master drummers came to the conclusion that, where "western" musicians think in terms of 1/4 notes, the African drummers thought more in terms of 1/8 notes, and were able to play very subtle variations in timing.
One author wrote that very complicated polyrhythms of African music had pretty much disappeared by the swing era, when written arrangements were the prevailing form for big bands. That rhythmic sophistication returned with bebop.
I've been reading too much to give you page #s for this!
And, as always, there are exceptions.
 

dchester

Moderator
Staff member
Another aspect to this, which I found interesting is that one of the authors of one of the above books reported that a musicologist who had worked with African master drummers came to the conclusion that, where "western" musicians think in terms of 1/4 notes, the African drummers thought more in terms of 1/8 notes, and were able to play very subtle variations in timing.
One author wrote that very complicated polyrhythms of African music had pretty much disappeared by the swing era, when written arrangements were the prevailing form for big bands. That rhythmic sophistication returned with bebop.
I've been reading too much to give you page #s for this!
And, as always, there are exceptions.
If you think in terms of eighth notes (in the example I gave earlier), then the odd numbered eighth notes would be the strong beats, and the even numbered ones would be the weak beats.
 
Here 2 years of group classes and 3 privates. I can't do close embrace well. :confused:The privates teacher would not do it with me because in her opinion you have to become proficient in open first. Also she said our height difference precluded it.

I do strongly suggest you find an Argentine teacher. If you are ever in London try Pablo Alonso
 

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