Holland America seems to be deleting Ballroom Dancing

danceronice

Well-Known Member
#21
most that I have been on also include soda, lemonade and iced tea, at least the ones that are out on lido or in public dining machines...
Cunard's rule was non-alc, free, alcoholic extra (except for champagne at departure--a split in your cabin, flutes available at the captain's reception on the fantail.) I think at the Princess and Queens' Grill suite levels more was included, but those are several orders of magnitude pricier to start with. Most people would at least do things like buy wine with dinner (I even managed to coast a bit there as a couple nights, other people at our table bought a bottle for the table) and buy drinks in the loungers, and the Veuve Cliquot champagne bar was extra as well including the food served there. At the dance nights, IIRC there was a bar available, but I was always dancing too much. It was seriously better than most ballroom studio socials I've been to as far as not sitting out unless I wanted to!
 

Loki

Well-Known Member
#25
And imagine 2-3 of those monsters docking at the same time at one smallish port. 6,000 people descending on the local attractions at once. Madness.
 

danceronice

Well-Known Member
#26
Heh. When I took the train to Halifax, there were a LOT of the big-box cruise ships in port at the terminal. They could fit three or four along the dock. It was a zoo of people, especially in the terminal shops. On my cruise, when Queen Mary 2 was docked, there wasn't ROOM for any other ship on the main terminal dock. She's an ocean liner, not a cruise ship, and built to be HUGE. Though passenger-wise, there weren't many more people than on one of the boxes-on-barges carries. The design changes required to be a trans-Atlantic ship during spring and winter mean they trade off a lot of height.
 

Loki

Well-Known Member
#27
Maybe that's why cruise lines put the discos on the uppermost decks - the floor pitching and rolling "enhances" St. Virus-like freestyle dancing.
 

danceronice

Well-Known Member
#30
On a ship the size of QM2 (admittedly in fair seas) the only thing I really noticed was my sense of distance was just a hair off--I doubt a non-dancer would even notice, but sometimes the distances between my foot and the floor when moving it, so when I'd set my foot down it would be quicker or farther to the floor than my brain thought it should be.
 

newbie

Well-Known Member
#31
Did some company try with a non-travelling ship? Would have much lower costs, and reading your posts it looks like the passengers are mainly here for the food and beverages and dancefloors and casinos.
 

davedove

Well-Known Member
#32
On a ship the size of QM2 (admittedly in fair seas) the only thing I really noticed was my sense of distance was just a hair off--I doubt a non-dancer would even notice, but sometimes the distances between my foot and the floor when moving it, so when I'd set my foot down it would be quicker or farther to the floor than my brain thought it should be.
That's what I noticed as well. It tends to throw you a little bit when the floor isn't where you're expecting it to be.:confused:
 

fascination

Site Moderator
Staff member
#33
Did some company try with a non-travelling ship? Would have much lower costs, and reading your posts it looks like the passengers are mainly here for the food and beverages and dancefloors and casinos.
personally, I have never set foot in the casino when I cruise....I prefer the gym and the spa....and the excursions, I also really don't go for the food and drink though I am happy to enjoy it
 

cornutt

Well-Known Member
#36
Since cruising in general seems to be being discussed, I'll throw in that we just did a river cruise. I think I much prefer river cruising. The boat is big enough so that there are people around but not so big that it feels crowded. All food was included. Alcohol was included at dinner only; other times it was extra, although you get a 150E credit to spend on the boat, so you'd have to drink a lot to go through that. Dancing... well, no. The dance floor was tiny and they didn't have music suitable for dancing every night. But we weren't really going for that, so it didn't bother us. We had a great time.
 
#38
I did a strictly come dancing cruise with p and o and loved it. They had lots of oppuntunities to dance and good instruction. I am going on p and o brittania in a few weeks and will see how their ballroom is
 

dancelvr

Well-Known Member
#39
I took a USA Dance cruise on HAL a few years ago. The only drinks included were coffee, tea, juice and water. The dance floors were sticky, and very small. The lessons provided were good, but the social dancing was MEH. That's all I'll say about that. However, I did have a great time (after ditching the dancing) at the sports bar at night, and during a couple of the excursions. I met some fantastic people, and I think I may have consumed my weight in vodka martinis.

On the very downside, I arrived on board completely healthy, and left with the most horrible cold I've had in years. Flying home with congested head and ears was a nightmare. Ugh.
 
#40
My travel agent was recently on HAL Eurodam after it was refurbished, he reports the same situation. He's not a dancer but does dance cruises so he knows what we want. Unless you're with a group, HAL was always pretty pathetic anyway, everything shut down after the old geezers waddled off to bed at 9PM.
Cunard, I've been hearing good reports about their music recently, but my own experience over several years was mediocre to abysmal. P&O is hard to book from North America, although the Oriana had reasonable dancing. Their new ships I'm told are 3,000 passenger with little dancing.
I now recommend only Costa. Large dance floors, music from 18.30 til 01.30, musicians really try to please the passengers.
 

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