Live music - not tango

#21
So my basic view is that i want to have an understanding of the structure of the music, so i can have shared musicality with my follower, but i don't actually like knowing a song by heart, because then if i am not careful my dancing becomes somewhat abstract, and if my follower can't understand how i relate to the music they can't be in the music themselves.
This is part of what prompted the original post. Although we enjoy dancing to golden age tangos, we almost prefer live (non-tango) because of the uncertainty. Blues, jazz, reggae, etc. all have well defined structures, or perhaps I know a version of the song. But, and especially with jazz, the details when played live can be quite surprising and can create a dynamic tension between myself and my partner, which I find lacking when we dance to one of the handful of GA tangos which are played repeatedly. And this is why I do NOT enjoy DJed "alternative" events. They have the downside of not being tango and the downside of being overly predictable. One or the other, ok. But I can only dance to "Over the Rainbow", or "Red Right Hand", or whatever else is currently popular in the alt scene, so many times before I just want to scream.
 

opendoor

Well-Known Member
#22
..we almost prefer live (non-tango) because of the uncertainty...
Your notion of musicality is kind of mapping the music with motion (dynamic, voices, tempo, mood, orchestration, intensity...). But I think this does not define muzicality entirely. The dancer also has to invent something that is not set by the music.
 
#23
Are you sure you know my notion of musicality? I am also a jazz drummer, and I try to dance tango a bit the way I play, which is to improvise within the form, but not to slavishly follow the form. If you listen to jazz drummers, you'll hear that, although they do keep time, they also do far more than that.
 

opendoor

Well-Known Member
#24
Ouch, apparently got in hot water :nurse: To correct myself: I did not mean you. I was just referring to your post, and the lack of uncertainty and challenges. PEACE
 
#25
Ouch, apparently got in hot water :nurse: To correct myself: I did not mean you. I was just referring to your post, and the lack of uncertainty and challenges. PEACE
No problem. At my age, with a mind like a steel sieve, I've already forgotten whatever it was that you wrote, so it's hard to take offense.
 

ArbeeNYC

Active Member
#26
From my experience the distinction between live and recorded music lies in the fact that while recorded music has an even and predictable beat, live music depends and the musician and that moment and usually it's either too slow, too fast or it alternates in between the two.
I find that in a Milonga it's easier to dance to a recorded music.
Almost all recorded tango music is easier to dance to and more consistent than live music. Not to mention that it's almost impossible these days to find a full tango orchestra that will stick to Golden Age music. Most like to improvise - often into extended solos and jazz ornamentation.
 

ArbeeNYC

Active Member
#27
And mine is the opposite of yours.
Last Sunday we had an orchestra of two musicians. Band and unplugged guitar. So much for the energy. And even the sound volume. The worst I've been supposed to dance on in terms of live music was an outdoor milonga with an orchestra of one musician, playing the guitar (unplugged too) and singing. Well I suppose he was singing, the lips were moving. Difficult to say though in such a large place and full of passers-by
Two musicians does not constitute an orchestra, much less a tango orchestra.
 

ArbeeNYC

Active Member
#28
Still have Cacho Dante's words in my ears: only milongueros went to the confiterias, but us serious dancers danced to live orchestras (especially Pugliese was his favorite). And Osvaldo Cartery admitted that he preferred the jazz and latin sets over tango, especially bolero had been his favorite for dancing close together.
I can understand that you try to stick to a dying tradition, jantango. But the traditions and customs you found in BsAs already were an artificial construction.
Tango is inherently atavistic. I mean, if you want to dance to modern music, there's plenty to go around. As for its death, I think you're off the mark there. Tango is an international obsession.
 
#32
Right, but the word "inherently" is in there. Is tango permanently, essentially, atavistic? Or is that just the (or one of the) modern context(s) around it now?
 

tangobro

Active Member
#33
Question for the open-minded.

My wife and I love dancing to live music - golden age tango preferred, but those bands/orquestas are hard to come by...
In New York City we have a few groups that play tango, one that recently formed is:

The Aces of Rhythm

The play in the spirit of the Juan D'Arienzo Orchestra

another is the Astoria Tango Club Orchestra



Maybe you can talk to your milonga organizers about bringing them to your area. More support would probably lead to more availability of good live tango music.

Each of their websites:

http://www.acesofrhythm.com/home/

http://www.astoriatangoorchestra.com/
 

tangobro

Active Member
#34
In New York City we have a few groups that play tango, one that recently formed is:

The Aces of Rhythm

They play in the spirit of the Juan D'Arienzo Orchestra
p.s. Yes, that is the milonguero "El Flaco Dani" Daniel Garcia among the dancers. He can be seen clearly for about the 1st 40 seconds of the vid.
 
#35
I'm not picky. I don't care whether the music is recorded or live. Each has their pluses and minuses. I care more about the people at the milonga and how much they help me have a good time.
 

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