Luca and Loraine Baricchi

samina

Well-Known Member
#2
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TB7bQWgH-bI

OMG!

And if you want to see the whole lecture that this demo is part of, you can link to it through Adwiz's nifty site:

http://dsblog.dancesportmusic.com/index.php?itemid=9&catid=4#more

Never know what you'll find on DF when you can't sleep and you're browsing around at 4 in the morning!
Oh, yum! Here's another one of the pair:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m5CfbkC5Sj0

Say, waltzgirl... is this what's come to be called "The Italian Style" as far as Waltz goes? It does look like how my instructor & his partner waltz, and they've been coached by Giampiero for the last year.

I'm not sure if I'm perceiving the nuances of this style correctly, but what I sense are these strong movements into a very lush, soft pause while the two stretch away from each other quite ecstatically. I've seen Giampiero coax his students into this beautiful holding type of energy (he often taught during my practice time -- normally I am extremely focused during practice, but dancing next to him for a couple hours stretched my focus-ability LOL).

My instructor did this type of movement with me for the first time the other night during Tango practice and the only point of reference I had for it was watching Giampiero or my instructor's comp videos.

Your video clip so gorgeously demonstrates that technique. My god, it is gorgeous!
 

samina

Well-Known Member
#3
omg... I've started watching the whole lecture from the 1st part and I'm absolutely engrossed. Did you watch everything, waltzgirl?

I so vibe with what this guy is saying -- I just want to drink him in! :D
And he sounds so much like my instructor, I would be he's in the "lineage" of the instruction he has received/is receiving. I'll have to ask him...

Anyway, back to the lecture...!
Samina
 

waltzgirl

Active Member
#4
Isn't it? I've actually never seen anything quite like it. It's part of a lecture Luca was doing and the whole lecture is very interesting--lots of stimulating ideas about form vs. function of technique, individual/couple balance, using all of your joints, and thinking of your body as a series of spheres (rather than the usual "blocks lined up" image). Fascinating stuff. In one part of the lecture, they dance tango and foxtrot to rumba music, showing that it's how they use their bodies that makes the dances work. I'm so inspired!
 

samina

Well-Known Member
#6
Oooo yeah... one of us has to buy the other a Coke, I think. LOL Not sure how to determine the winner, tho!

Not that I drink Coke. Make it Virtual Coke! :D

I called my instructor and told him I'd emailed the link to him, and I asked him if he knew of Luca Barucchi. Most definitely, it turns out. Cool.

Do ya wanna dance like that or what, Waltzie? :)

Sami
 

samina

Well-Known Member
#8
Here is a site with a fuller version of the waltz I posted above, plus the tango, foxtrot, & vw from the same competition.

Also, there is an earlier set of videos of the pair (from 1994).

A bonus: some nice vids of Slavik & Karina dancing by themselves in the studio!

http://www.danceuniverse.co.kr/

Samina
 

samina

Well-Known Member
#9
And he sounds so much like my instructor, I would bet he's in the "lineage" of the instruction he has received/is receiving.
Seems I was on the right track in perceiving a thread of connection from Baricchi (found out that's the correct spelling) through Giampiero to my instructor: On the baricchi.com website, Giampiero is the NY contact for Baricchi's dance company.

I think that's pretty cool, that one can see technique being passed down through a "family" of dancers.

And let me say, wild dogs and a rabid snow beast couldn't dislodge me from this instructional loop I happened to step into.

Reminds me of Laura when she said she got to start out with Jonathan Wilkins -- what an auspicious start! :D

Those "lecture" videos just blow me away. Certainly Waltzie & I can't be the only ones???

Samina
 
#11
Their dancing blows me away too, my favorite clip is this foxtrot: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1gQEik74U7k
That was great! I really like the understated music, too. It gave the impression that the music was accompanying the dancers, the way it accompanies a singer.

But the thing that blows me away about the lecture demos is the fluid, passionate way they use their upper bodies. They don't do that nearly as much in the comp videos.

Now I wish I'd given the thread a more intriguing title, so more people would look at it!
 
#12
Yeah, that's what caught my eye too, especially since over the summer I was just introduced to the concept of using the upper body in standard. I think you can see that develop in their videos across the years. For example on youtube there are the 1998 Blackpool finals, and they seem to be using their upper bodies much more in that foxtrot show from 2002.

By the way, I think they had both been quite succesful in amateur Latin, so I suppose their latin training contributed to some of how they dance standard?
 
#14
Wow!

(I wish the announcer hadn't broken the spell quite so quickly at the end!)

Maybe we should just keep bumping this thread every day until some other folks take a look at it.

I don't dance standard and haven't paid a huge amount of attention to it, so maybe they are old news to other people here.

But if so, why don't we see more people dancing like that (or trying to)?
 
#15
I LOVE Luca and Lorraine! I've been watching these videos for while and they are my favorite standard couple- to me they present an entire package- grace, artistry, athleticism, etc. Plus the lectures are enlightening and their shows are incredible- they really feel complete, seem to tell a story, and they have that great intangible quality to reach an audience's emotions. Not enough couples do that in their show routines today.
 
#16
Also they are one of the very, very few couples I watch as a couple, rather than focusing on either the man or the lady. They match each other so perfectly...

I also like that their shows have no gimmicks. A lot of shows seem to really on props and theatrical introductions rather than purely excellent dancing.
 

samina

Well-Known Member
#17
Wow!

I don't dance standard and haven't paid a huge amount of attention to it, so maybe they are old news to other people here.

But if so, why don't we see more people dancing like that (or trying to)?
I'm no expert on the subject, but I'm thinking that probably knowledge of the technique of using such fluid upper-body movement in standard isn't so widespread, and therefore hasn't trickled down through instructors into students.

Samina
 

samina

Well-Known Member
#18
I LOVE Luca and Lorraine! I've been watching these videos for while and they are my favorite standard couple- to me they present an entire package- grace, artistry, athleticism, etc. Plus the lectures are enlightening and their shows are incredible- they really feel complete, seem to tell a story, and they have that great intangible quality to reach an audience's emotions. Not enough couples do that in their show routines today.
I agree on every level!!! They B.L.O.W.M.E.A.W.A.Y. 8D

Samina
 
#19
I'm no expert on the subject, but I'm thinking that probably knowledge of the technique of using such fluid upper-body movement in standard isn't so widespread, and therefore hasn't trickled down through instructors into students.
Part of the issue is the challenging of hitting the precise balance between fluidity and body alignment. There was some discussion here a while back about the "wriggly puppy" effect in students, and that is a quite real risk the minute fluidity is contemplated. On the other hand, alignment can easily become impeding stiffness. In Luca's lecture when he warns about form, his demonstration of why it is a problem is danced unrealistically rigid, well beyond what someone trying to teacher the concept of form would want.

In the strictess sense though, it's not about amount of fludity vs stiffness, but about the precise location - this part of the torso must remain aligned, this part should stretch to accomodate the partner, etc. Instead of playing with words like more or less, it's really worth talking (or feeling) specifics with a teacher prepared to be specific.
 

samina

Well-Known Member
#20
I thought you would have a good comment on this subject, Chris! :)

There was some discussion here a while back about the "wriggly puppy" effect in students, and that is a quite real risk the minute fluidity is contemplated...
Yes, from beginning to work with my own body to train it so that it has both the flexibility & the control to move like that, I can definitely see what you mean.

In the strictess sense though, it's not about amount of fludity vs stiffness, but about the precise location - this part of the torso must remain aligned, this part should stretch to accomodate the partner, etc. Instead of playing with words like more or less, it's really worth talking (or feeling) specifics with a teacher prepared to be specific.
I gathered from listening to Luca that an understanding of how to achieve the beauty of that fluidity lies in understanding the nuances of how to subtley articulate the spheres of movement around each joint. Not something I understand. But I look forward to getting to the point where I can start to absorb that information.

Have you studied this kind of movement much, Chris?

Samina
 

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