Our experience of our own dancing can differ from how others experience it

newbie

Well-Known Member
#3
About the first 30 seconds, would you ballroomers say that they dance well, by the usual criterias of ballroom?
 

snapdancer

Well-Known Member
#5
About the first 30 seconds, would you ballroomers say that they dance well, by the usual criterias of ballroom?
You've missed the point of the video. Lois was dancing for her own pleasure, not for that of judges or an audience. The first version was how she experienced it in her head. The second version was an actual video of her performance, and it was clear that her dance partner and the other people nearby experienced it a different way. The version at the end of the clip was how her husband experienced her dancing.

The "usual criteria" of what pleases judges and an audience do not apply to social dancing. My philosophy is that if you're having fun, your partner is also having fun, and the people around you are still having fun, then it's all good. And if the people around you don't like the way you loo, then they can d--n well look somewhere else.

Yes, floorcraft and musicality are important. Also technique. These can on average improve the experience, but not necessarily. I have some good memories of dancing with ladies new to dancing and had never had a lesson in the particular dance we were doing. Also have some not-so-good memories of dancing with ladies who might have had more training.
 

newbie

Well-Known Member
#6
You've missed the point of the video. The first version was how she experienced it in her head. The second version was an actual video of her performance.
I actually had gotten the point. And still, I was was wondering whether the first part, supposed to be perfect, being a reconstructed dream, was actually good at all or even acceptable in the eye of someone who actually knows about ballroom. It's joyful, it's not too clumsy, yet in which league would the couple be allowed to compete in?
 

snapdancer

Well-Known Member
#7
yet in which league would the couple be allowed to compete in?
There is no league that I know of in which the couple would be allowed to compete. Which is totally 100% irrelevant to the point of this thread.

If you think that the point of dancing is competing, you are wrong. More than 99% of dancing is done for reasons other than competition. Which is good because most dancing would have the judges dropping their clipboards to hold their noses and cover their eyes. Which is irrelevant because in most cases the dancers are dancing for their own pleasures. Which would also be the case for Lois.
 

Larinda McRaven

Site Moderator
Staff member
#9
About the first 30 seconds, would you ballroomers say that they dance well, by the usual criterias of ballroom?
I understand your question. I have the same question when I look at Tango dancers. I can evaluate them by the standards of my own genre but have little understanding of the values that Tango dancers hold dear.

They look like somewhat ok amateur ballroomers. If you are asking for a critique... It actually isn't bad. Their posture is ok, no pushing, pulling or yanking, respectful of space. None of that is surprising... the actress Jane Kaczmarek has a dance background. The only negative critique I would give it is that the final lift at :28 there are several issues with center of gravity and the fulcrum point, leading to a heavy look and clumsy exit... and most of that is his fault.

I usually do a quick scan of a man's dancing and judge him on it, socially, as to whether or not he looks like he would be comfortable to dance with, not how "perfect" he is. I would not mind dancing with this guy if he asked. (as long we aren't doing that hip lift lol) If I were a leader I would ask Lois #1 to dance. I would not ask Lois #2 to dance.

So to answer your question, yes, they dance ok. I see better and worse dancers at competitions. I see better and worse dancers at socials.
 
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