Pablo Veron

FTL

New Member
#21
I came across an Argentine instructional video a few years ago wherein the instructor was saying that Milonga is suppose to look less refined than tango. His analogy is that Milonga is like going out in jeans and having beer with friends while tango is like dining in an upscale restaurant in elegant outfit. I cannot remember the name but his performance was just as rough as Veron's.

In Assassination Tango, I think there is an occasional disconnect between the dance and the music. They are also dancing on what looks like a concrete pavement which probably affects execution.
 

Peaches

Well-Known Member
#23
I know of orillero style, but I can't pick anything out as a defining characteristic. Can you tell me more about it, or point me to references?
 

bastet

Active Member
#24
I know of orillero style, but I can't pick anything out as a defining characteristic. Can you tell me more about it, or point me to references?

Here is one person's take on it. I don't know that much abouyt Orillero style but the video I linked to comes from him and that is what I saw that I thought was similar...

http://www.virtuar.com/tango/articles/2007/what_is_orillero.htm

and also I found a bit on Tejastango:

http://www.tejastango.com/tango_styles.html#orillero

**extra note: based on the descriptions on Tejastango on Canyenge, and the fact that the couple in the video (not Pablo) was dancing to Los Tubatangos (I think) I'm wondering either the relation between Canyenge and Orillero or if it was Canyenge...I have no idea...they appear to have 2 slightly differnt opinions on it.
 

Peaches

Well-Known Member
#25
Thanks, bastet.

It would be really nice if i could find someone who specializes in Canyenge and/or Orillero. All I know is that they're the much older styles of tango.
 
#26
Canyengue is more a milonga style, Orillero is more a tango one. Canyengue is strictly connected to the African roots of Argentinian Tango.
Orillero refers to people who lived in the orillas (suburbs) of Rio de la Plata and then to their style of dancing. The dancing scene was not homogeneous: each zone had its own style of dancing, so you had the confiteria style, the orillero one, and so on.
 

bastet

Active Member
#27
Canyengue is more a milonga style, Orillero is more a tango one. Canyengue is strictly connected to the African roots of Argentinian Tango.
Orillero refers to people who lived in the orillas (suburbs) of Rio de la Plata and then to their style of dancing. The dancing scene was not homogeneous: each zone had its own style of dancing, so you had the confiteria style, the orillero one, and so on.
Thanks for the info. I appreciate the clarification.

Based on this, would you call the second video link I posted more of a Canyengue or was it still Orillero, like the person in the original blog link says? And how about Veron's video? Would you include that in with Orillero or Canyengue? One of the sites I listed says Canyengue is danced with bent legs, no crusada, and that Los Tubatangos play Canyengue style and all those elements were present in the second video. One of the remarks on the video was that it was actually Canyengue style.
 

bastet

Active Member
#29
Thanks for posting that! Those both sort fo fit in to what I imagine Canyengue to be. Would you happen to have any links to Orillero style videos to further clarify the differnce?
 

Peaches

Well-Known Member
#31
OK. Yeah, that fits with what I've been taught as Canyengue. Doesn't look much like the Veron video, though, IMO. Huh. *shrug*
 

bastet

Active Member
#32
The following video is canyengue:
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Note the posture and the embrace: if you see something like that, you can be sure it's canyengue. ;)


This link? http://it.youtube.com/watch?v=k53zVfkLjTQ It seems to me they are mixing styles. Mostly canyengue.
I think the first video of Veron is canyengue.
Just going back to look at it again. So my quesiton is- is the large offset in the embrace a characteristic in Canyengue? It seems all 3 videos have the strong offset (more or less) of the follower that seems to stay there, in addition to the posture and knee bending.
 

Peaches

Well-Known Member
#33
My (very limited) understanding, is that Canyengue is characterized by the very offset, very open (approaching 90 degrees) angle of the embrace; the bent knees; the simple, very rhythmic steps; and the type of music it's danced to (very old). I believe the clasped hands being held lower is also typical.
 
#34
My (very limited) understanding, is that Canyengue is characterized by the very offset, very open (approaching 90 degrees) angle of the embrace; the bent knees; the simple, very rhythmic steps; and the type of music it's danced to (very old). I believe the clasped hands being held lower is also typical.
Yes, this is what I've heard too. And been forced to try by mad Argentinians occasionally...
 

Peaches

Well-Known Member
#35
Yep. Now and again my teacher will get it in his head that I should work on Canyengue. Either that or he just wants to dance it now and again. It's a very odd feel, but fun, in a different sort of way.
 

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