Paso Doble played until the 3rd Clash

#1
Interesting my spell checker wanted to transform Paso Doble into Paso Robles. Ha. But I assume this means that we are talking about reaching the third Clash in the song España Cani (others too?). How much time to the third Clash? How do the bars of music map out?
 

dlliba10

Well-Known Member
#5
At 60MPM, my pasos' 3rd crash reaches about 2:06 (2nd crash at about 1:18). But I tend to play 2 crashes for everything except champ finals, unless otherwise instructed by my chair (and I usually call across the dais "2 or 3?" every time to make sure).
 

FancyFeet

Well-Known Member
#6
I seem to recall learning that the amount of time between the crashes is different... which means when it unexpectedly goes long, you can see some funny stuff if people have never choreographed/practiced/listened up to the 3rd highlight.

Thanks to my old notes from paso (which I distinctly remember writing down because I'm terrible about actually counting dances, and was finding the count changes odd when using my usual method), I found it goes:

16 measures (usually counted 8 8 8 8), 2 measures (4)

24 measures (8 8 8 8 8 8), 2 measures (4) ending in 1st highlight

8 measures (8 8), 1 measure (2 - sometimes combined with the previous 8 and counted as a 10) 4 measures (8), 3 measures (6), 16 measures (8 8 8 8), 3 measures (6) ending in 2nd highlight

16 measures (8 8 8 8), 16 measures (8 8 8 8), 8 measures (8 8), 2 1/2 measures (5) into 3rd highlight​

I'm reasonably sure this musical structure holds for all pasos in 2/4 time (at least, that's what my notes say), which is great since we rarely hear anything but Espana Cani in North America, meaning routines will still work.

Note: There are pasos in 6/8 and 3/4 time, but I don't think I've ever heard them played in competition, even in Europe... I have no idea how they are structured.
 

dlliba10

Well-Known Member
#7
16 measures (usually counted 8 8 8 8), 2 measures (4)

24 measures (8 8 8 8 8 8), 2 measures (4) ending in 1st highlight

8 measures (8 8), 1 measure (2 - sometimes combined with the previous 8 and counted as a 10) 4 measures (8), 3 measures (6), 16 measures (8 8 8 8), 3 measures (6) ending in 2nd highlight

16 measures (8 8 8 8), 16 measures (8 8 8 8), 8 measures (8 8), 2 1/2 measures (5) into 3rd highlight​
My notes from when I danced syllabus paso differ slightly in the delineation of those weird measure groupings (also, I found it much easier to count in 8s and individual beats rather than half-note measures):

88884
8888
88
1-2-3-4

882
86
8888
1-2-3-4-5-6

8888
88
8888
1-2-3-4-5
 

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