Professional or not?

#1
So, I have experience working with dance companies (outside of an educational environment). I have not received compensation in the form of traditional dollars, but I have received compensation in the form of dinners, gifts, drawings, pictures, and transportation. Would that still be considered professional? I'm still trying to figure out the labels of everything. I did not have to pay to be in these companies and they are not affiliated with a school.
 

fascination

Site Moderator
Staff member
#2
not sure how it works with ballet...but in terms of ballroom I would think you could very safely claim to never have been a pro
 

Bailamosdance

Well-Known Member
#4
Getting paid in the am world is not prerequisite for being 'pro'. A 'pro' declares themselves a pro and competes in the pro track. It has nothing to do with your 'job'. If you wish to compete as an amateur, simply compete.
 

tangotime

Well-Known Member
#6
So, I have experience working with dance companies (outside of an educational environment). I have not received compensation in the form of traditional dollars, but I have received compensation in the form of dinners, gifts, drawings, pictures, and transportation. Would that still be considered professional? I'm still trying to figure out the labels of everything. I did not have to pay to be in these companies and they are not affiliated with a school.
Tax laws on "gifts " for services rendered , are considered income, over a certain value .I don't think yours qualify..
 

danceronice

Well-Known Member
#7
For tax purposes, you would need to show income over a certain period (depending on what tax jurisdiction you live in, US and what state.) For purposes of your sport or art, depends on the sport. In ballroom, you wouldn't be a pro. In equestrian (governed by USEF, at least) if you were given the dinners, gifts, etc. as direct payment--ie it wasn't a case of them providing food in the green room, they weren't participation gifts that everyone received--specifically as compensation for your performance, then if you are over 18 they'd consider you a professional. If you're in a sport with a governing body or a performance art with a union, you need to read the specific rules covering non-monetary compensation. Stuff that would not make me a professional in skating would make me a pro in horseback riding.
 
#8
I have no idea, but I'm just thinking of amateur hockey players. They get per diem, may get gift cards, room and board, but they are still considered amateurs, so I would think that unless you get paid in actual money, you are not considered professional.
 

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