Recommended teaching videos?

#1
I just talked to a woman from Texas who is trying to learn Argentine tango there. The studio that she is attending is using the teaching videos from a ballroom couple called Librero - Ballroom 101. I watched them a little, and saw the 8cb (which I don't much like) with a huge backstep, and the second lesson was already follower's front ochos. I don't teach front ochos to beginners because it turns too many followers into "ocho machines". The music was Color Tango, great music but not too good for beginners. They were, however, in a nice embrace.

I've never really seen a teaching video for beginners that I liked. Does anybody out there have a recommendation?
 
#2
I just talked to a woman from Texas who is trying to learn Argentine tango there. The studio that she is attending is using the teaching videos from a ballroom couple called Librero - Ballroom 101. I watched them a little, and saw the 8cb (which I don't much like) with a huge backstep, and the second lesson was already follower's front ochos. I don't teach front ochos to beginners because it turns too many followers into "ocho machines". The music was Color Tango, great music but not too good for beginners. They were, however, in a nice embrace.

I've never really seen a teaching video for beginners that I liked. Does anybody out there have a recommendation?
 
#3
My favorite for beginners is Howcast's Tango here: For more complex moves, I like Clint Rauscher's instruction here: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCjn2RkLv9YffF5WnwWpo5SA
I have some criticism of his style and don't emulate it, but his explanation of moves and the vast number of moves he has in his channel is a contribution to the art. Of course there are individual videos from a variety of instructions but most aren't organized as a collection for teaching.
 

newbie

Well-Known Member
#4
I'd say Howcast for the online videos. The footage is well done, they're in a studio and not in a kitchen's corner. Also the two dancers move in a natural way.
For DVDs, S. Brown used to have a webpage named Video resources for the tango dancer, but it's more a long long list than a "top 3" one, you'll have to scan the reviews.
 

newbie

Well-Known Member
#5
Wasn't aware of him. Just saw a video about vals and ochos. Boy the guy is so stiff and rigid! Where is the life? Where is the musicality? The beginner who sees that will drop tango and take up Salsa. Ok you'll say that the guy does not have the body of the Howcast youngsters, but consider this class by old heavyweight Balmaceda:
How lively! How inspirational!
 

Mladenac

Well-Known Member
#6
Well, I can find good series for beginners.

But the trick is if she learns properly and with that kind of community nobody will be dancing with her.
Either she won't be invited or she won't accept with poor dancers.

So maybe it is more important to have AT in a form of community she is.
And when she starts to travel that she will explore and expands her tango.

And in the end, those AT traveller need to learn to adapt to every partner. ;)
She needs to start somewhere. Luckily some people had better teachers than she has.
 
#8
There can't be teaching videos for female beginners.

Female beginners must learn musicality, good posture and the skill of following. A follower must go where her leader wants her to go.

Then they can learn walking, ochos, molinetes from videos.
 

Mladenac

Well-Known Member
#10
There can't be teaching videos for female beginners.

Female beginners must learn musicality, good posture and the skill of following. A follower must go where her leader wants her to go.

Then they can learn walking, ochos, molinetes from videos.
This is true and not true.

Beginners don't know how to lead, better dancers correct followers' mistakes
 

ArbeeNYC

Active Member
#12
I just talked to a woman from Texas who is trying to learn Argentine tango there. The studio that she is attending is using the teaching videos from a ballroom couple called Librero - Ballroom 101. I watched them a little, and saw the 8cb (which I don't much like) with a huge backstep, and the second lesson was already follower's front ochos. I don't teach front ochos to beginners because it turns too many followers into "ocho machines". The music was Color Tango, great music but not too good for beginners. They were, however, in a nice embrace.

I've never really seen a teaching video for beginners that I liked. Does anybody out there have a recommendation?
Well, I've watched a lot of teaching videos on line and can't say they were very useful. They're informative but difficult to put into practice without a plan and a partner. And even then, you have no way of knowing if you're doing it correctly. My vote would be to skip the videos except to get an idea of how others move and work on practicing the basics.
 
#14
Short clips from Mary Ann and Oscar Casas have been quite helpful for me.
There are a lot of them online, just two that I remember:



But best is to review videos of oneself trying to dance tango. :snaphappy:
 
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ArbeeNYC

Active Member
#15
Yes, I know. I've seen a bunch of those, too. Oscar is a cool guy and his wife is a great dancer, but I don't think I've ever learned anything I could use from them. Just some interesting ideas and principles. Best way to learn is to have someone show you. Even something simple can change the way you dance or what you do. The most useful videos I've seen are those for physical exercises and stretching exercises.
 

sixela

Well-Known Member
#18
I don't think I've ever learned anything I could use from them. Just some interesting ideas and principles.
I think you just inadvertently contradicted yourself: I think some interesting ideas and principles (and their illustrations) are exactly what you can (still) expect from videos, and you admitted to have learnt just that. On the other hand, you still need to feel how these map to your dance --and need feedback from someone more experience watching you dance-- and it's futile to hope a video will do that.
 

ArbeeNYC

Active Member
#19
I think you just inadvertently contradicted yourself: I think some interesting ideas and principles (and their illustrations) are exactly what you can (still) expect from videos, and you admitted to have learnt just that. On the other hand, you still need to feel how these map to your dance --and need feedback from someone more experience watching you dance-- and it's futile to hope a video will do that.
You can get interesting ideas and principles from books too, but they don't help on the dance floor. I've watched hundreds of teaching videos, but can't say I've ever learned something directly from one. As I said, the best way to learn is to have someone show you. For a video to be useful, you have to already know how to dance and then you would need to watch the video repeatedly as you practice in a studio. Watch, practice, repeat. However, physical connection with another dancer is infinitely superior and much faster. You can't see what you're doing wrong from watching someone else's video. Better to study videos of someone you really like and try to do what they do or, better yet, study with them if possible.
 

sixela

Well-Known Member
#20
You can get interesting ideas and principles from books too, but they don't help on the dance floor.
On their own, no, but they can make you explore things that you wouldn't have explored otherwise. Sometimes it is not more than combining things that you already know (and master well enough to integrate them in your dance) in an unexpected way.

As I said, that's all you can get from videos (or books): it's the start of a journey, not the end of it; if you think that you can get a movement fully sprung from nothingness into your dance just from watching a video then you have unrealistic expectations about what a video can do for you.

I do think it's easier to get ideas from videos than from books -- you'd be hard pressed to express some of the ideas that you can see in a video in words clearly.
 

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