Reggaeton

youngsta

Active Member
#21
I definitely dance it more Reggae dancehall style than hip-hop. Actually I probably blend a little of all those elements (dancehall, hip-hop, afro-cuban body movements) when I dance to it.
 
#23
:) I don't like raggaeton, nor do I accept to dance it with strangers...

It's ok with close friends, and super with my BF... but this is it! I may dance it with girls, but usually I dance the raggaeton only if I am pretty drunk and in a sleazy mood...

@ timbafreak... I've seen top salseros in LA dance to "Dale"... it was interesting to say the least... :shock: :shock: :shock:
 

MacMoto

Active Member
#25
luh said:
stupid question, but is reggaeton related to reggae?
luh
Yes...

History

The first Reggae recordings in Latin America were made in Panama in the mid-1970s. A large number of Jamaican immigrants, brought in to build the Panama Canal, brought Reggae music with them and introduced it to the local population. Nando Boom is considered one of the first raggamuffin deejays from Panama. Without Panamanian ragga deejays like El General, reggaeton would never have caught on. Some even argue that reggaeton itself started in Panama, and that Puerto Rican artists merely added influences from house music and hip hop. Those, however, are defining elements of the reggaeton sound.

In 1985, rapper Vico C from Puerto Rico produced one of the first Spanish-language hip hop records in Puerto Rico. Thus the two main influences of the genre were in place, as well as the two main producing countries.

Reggae production took off seriously in Panama in the early nineties, about the same time Jamaican ragga imports were becoming popular in Puerto Rico. It was common practice to translate an original Jamaican reggae song (the same melody and rhythm, but with translated lyrics). Towards the middle of the decade, Puerto Ricans were producing their own "riddims" with clear influences from hip hop and other styles. These are considered the first proper reggaeton tracks, initially called "under", a short form of "Underground".

The reggaeton scene widened when Puerto Rican and Cuban styles perfused the Panamanian-style reggae. Today, the music flourishes throughout Latin America.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reggaeton
So reggaeton has its roots in reggae, although it's barely recognisable when you listen to today's reggaeton, which is essentially latin hip-hop I think.
 
#26
SalseraLaura said:
[threadjack]hey sabor hows things? im missing everyone in cairo. there was definitely some booty shakin goin on in egypt. do they play any reggaeton over there at the clubs now?[/threadjack]
hey darling.. u are definitely missed too.. come back sometime in the not so distant future.. i barely got to dance with u relatively speaking, but its your fault cause evreybody was standing in line.. poor me :p

as for reggaeton,, not they dont really play it normally.. i have to specially nagg on Rami or Suzie to play me one or two.. still not popular here being small scene and all..
 

luh

Active Member
#27
MacMoto said:
History

The first Reggae recordings in Latin America were made in Panama in the mid-1970s. A large number of Jamaican immigrants, brought in to build the Panama Canal, brought Reggae music with them and introduced it to the local population. Nando Boom is considered one of the first raggamuffin deejays from Panama. Without Panamanian ragga deejays like El General, reggaeton would never have caught on. Some even argue that reggaeton itself started in Panama, and that Puerto Rican artists merely added influences from house music and hip hop. Those, however, are defining elements of the reggaeton sound.

In 1985, rapper Vico C from Puerto Rico produced one of the first Spanish-language hip hop records in Puerto Rico. Thus the two main influences of the genre were in place, as well as the two main producing countries.

Reggae production took off seriously in Panama in the early nineties, about the same time Jamaican ragga imports were becoming popular in Puerto Rico. It was common practice to translate an original Jamaican reggae song (the same melody and rhythm, but with translated lyrics). Towards the middle of the decade, Puerto Ricans were producing their own "riddims" with clear influences from hip hop and other styles. These are considered the first proper reggaeton tracks, initially called "under", a short form of "Underground".

The reggaeton scene widened when Puerto Rican and Cuban styles perfused the Panamanian-style reggae. Today, the music flourishes throughout Latin America.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reggaeton
So reggaeton has its roots in reggae, although it's barely recognisable when you listen to today's reggaeton, which is essentially latin hip-hop I think.[/quote]

thanks. you probably know that reggae itself is also a root to the "normal" hiphop (the dance funnily has roots in lindy hop)

i was just confused about the reggaeton. i actually do a ska-reggae show,(since 5 years now) but had never heard of reggaeton.
btw, ska can make you dance very very nice too. though it's not a partner dance ;)
anyone questions to ska - ask me :D
luh
 
#28
MacMoto said:
So reggaeton has its roots in reggae, although it's barely recognisable when you listen to today's reggaeton, which is essentially latin hip-hop I think.
Most reggaeton sounds very closely related to dancehall reggae/ragga, which is what a lot under-30s mean when they refer to "reggae." (I am not guessing your age or anything. I'm about to turn 40 myself, and I remember being very ambivalent about dancehall when I started hearing in on the roots-oriented reggae show I listened to in high school.) The rapping in reggaeton sometimes seems closer to hip-hop style rapping than to dancehall style rapping. But the basic beat in reggaeton is pretty closely related to dancehall reggae.

(I've been checking a bunch of the "better" albums out lately, and I don't think I can be bothered sifting through this mess just to find the occasional song I like. Also I'm getting tired of hearing people yell LUNY! NORIEGA! *gunshot-sounds: pow-pow-pow-pow*.)
 
#32
Reggaton dance wise is a mix of dance hall, hip-hop, and latin. Not so much a conscious thing as various elements that all the dances have in their roots
(west african) that have come back together.

The song the couple was dancing to was actually a remix of Beyonce's Naughty Girl, not Brittany.

As to the couple dancing... the guy is a ballroom salsa dancer yes? His arms mess up his Reggaton. Way too much, too big, too often, with way too much affectation.
 
#33
I stand corrected... obviously it's been a while since I've been in what we call "an American club"... and pairing songs and artists has never been my forte
 

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