salsa or cumbia

#1
There are songs that are difficult to classify as salsa or cumbia. How do you know which one to dance? For example: "Pa la fiesta voy" - Lou Perez
 

opendoor

Well-Known Member
#7
There are songs that are difficult to classify as salsa or cumbia...
Salsa and cumbia aren´t opposites. Cumbia is salsa, but salsa isn´t cumbia. Salsa initially meant caribbean pop music broadcasted in the US. Now it means all or nothing.
Pachanga as tangotime already said, and if you do not know that style, simply dance mambo cubano to it.
emsanchez said:
Cumbia, of course.
emsanchez said:
How do you know which one to dance?
Cumbia:
-has got a 2/4 feel (also when it actually was written in 4/4), and a strong off-beat;
-Maracas never missing;
-very often an accordion plays along with the band (not in the given example).
-rather simple music, but there are exceptions noteworthy.
Salsa: You should ask more precisely
 

Bailamosdance

Well-Known Member
#8
Salsa: totally different format from Cumbia (montunos etc) including inspiraciones, breaks, and a more complex rhythm section which includes congas, timbales, etc. Traditional instrumentation includes piano and horns, coro, etc.

Cumbia: electric gtr playing continually through the song, strict tempo, no horns or strings. Tends to sound vocally more Jibaro.

"Salsa" was originally used to market Latin music to the world, in the late 60s. Originally very political and young in approach, it has grown to include a larger spectrum of styles etc. Many Salsa albums included cha chas, rumbas and other Latin forms.
 

tangotime

Well-Known Member
#9
Salsa and cumbia aren´t opposites.

Cumbia is salsa, but salsa isn´t cumbia. Salsa initially meant caribbean pop music broadcasted in the US. Now it means all or nothing.


Cumbia is NOT salsa.. its an indigenous dance in its own right . Cumbia " rhythms " often are given passages in some salsa songs, thats when one SHOULD change the dance form to the appropriate music .



And.. salsa is NOT Carib. pop. Its Cuban, with a NY " twist ". Theres a very long disussion on Salsa Forums that, includes some notable musicologists , from PR and Cuba, plus some latino musicians, giving weight to the subject .

Its pretty much all Son based, the essential differences are, the styles in its played/recorded.
is there "pop " salsa ? of course, but it comes out of PR, Colombia,Venezuela and NYC.A lot of salsa romantica is often classified that way( not a fair comparison ) .

Cuba, is now into Timba and Regaton .

If anyone wants factual info, go to Salsa Forums.. you wont find anyone more knowledgable posting, anywhere .
 

tangotime

Well-Known Member
#10
Salsa: totally different format from Cumbia (montunos etc) including inspiraciones, breaks, and a more complex rhythm section which includes congas, timbales, etc. Traditional instrumentation includes piano and horns, coro, etc.

Cumbia: electric gtr playing continually through the song, strict tempo, no horns or strings. Tends to sound vocally more Jibaro.

"Salsa" was originally used to market Latin music to the world, in the late 60s. Originally very political and young in approach, it has grown to include a larger spectrum of styles etc. Many Salsa albums included cha chas, rumbas and other Latin forms.


Sorry, I missed your post before I posted .:oops:.

One more thing to add... Cumbia music ,is a syncopted bar as in.. 1and 2.. 3and4 .
 

opendoor

Well-Known Member
#17
opendoor said:
Salsa and cumbia aren´t opposites. Cumbia is salsa, but salsa isn´t cumbia.
Hey I have heard that before: "All salsa is mambo, but not all mambo is salsa" ...what does it mean?
Hi Simi, nothing to get excited about: Salsa is nothing special, it´s not a certain style, it´s only an umbrella term for all and nothing. Salsa means hot sauce, and it´s ingredients are mambo, or cumbia, or cali, or casino, or LA-style, or .... Today also bachata, merengue, zouck are among the term salsa.
 

tangotime

Well-Known Member
#19
The singer kept singing "PARA BAILAR PACHANGA". And it already says PACHANGA on the video.

Man, it doesn't get any more clear than that. :D
Often , in songs, the sonero will interject verbally, a different musical style into his performance, but, that does not necessarily mean that, what they "voice " is the song style .

To take into account; there are songs which do change ,from , for e.g. a salsa to a cumbia rhythm then back again to salsa . They also often slot in a Son passage .And.. even go from salsa to guajiras .
 

tangotime

Well-Known Member
#20
Then it is very much like Samba, istn't it?

ONLY from a musical standpoint. Cumbia is an indigenous dance form, and, the instrumentation is clearly defined. The reason I gave that comparison ,was only from a rhythmically perspective, and, the basic resembles a Whisk ( modified ) .There, all comparisons end .
 

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